10 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Amy Baehr (Hofstra University)
  1. Amy R. Baehr (2014). On Zona Vallance's “Women as Moral Beings”. Ethics 125 (1):200-203,.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Amy R. Baehr (2013). Liberal Feminism. In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Amy R. Baehr (2010). Toward a Humanist Justice. Social Theory and Practice 36 (3):525-533.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Amy R. Baehr (2009). Conservatism, Feminism, and Elizabeth Fox-Genovese. Hypatia 24 (2):101 - 124.
    This paper is a philosophical reconstruction of Elizabeth Fox-Genovese's thinking about women and feminism, and an inquiry into whether there is a conservative form of feminism. The paper argues that Fox-Genovese's endorsement of conventional social forms (like traditional marriage, motherhood, and sexual morality) contrasts strongly with feminism's criticism of these forms, and feminism's claim that they should be transformed. The paper concludes, however, that one need not call Fox-Genovese's thought "feminist" to recognize it as serious advocacy on behalf of women (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Amy R. Baehr (2008). Perfectionism, Feminism and Public Reason. Law and Philosophy 27 (2):193 - 222.
  6. Amy R. Baehr (2004). Feminist Politics and Feminist Pluralism: Can We Do Feminist Political Theory Without Theories of Gender? Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (4):411–436.
  7. Amy R. Baehr (2003). A Feminist Liberal Approach to Hate Crime Legislation. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):134–152.
  8. Amy R. Baehr (2002). Book Review: Alison Jeffries. Women's Voices, Women's Rights: Oxford Amnesty Lectures 1996. Boulder: Westview Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (1):197-200.
  9. Amy R. Baehr (2000). Partisan or Neutral? Teaching Philosophy 23 (3):290-295.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Amy R. Baehr (1996). Toward a New Feminist Liberalism: Okin, Rawls, and Habermas. Hypatia 11 (1):49 - 66.
    While Okin's feminist appropriation of Rawls's theory of justice requires that principles of justice be applied directly to the family, Rawls seems to require only that the family be minimally just. Rawls's recent proposal dulls the critical edge of liberalism by capitulating too much to those holding sexist doctrines. Okin's proposal, however, is insufficiently flexible. An alternative account of the relation of the political and the nonpolitical is offered by Jürgen Habermas.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation