Search results for 'Analogical Argument' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    William R. Brown (1995). The Domain Constraint on Analogy and Analogical Argument. Informal Logic 17 (1).
    Domain constraint, the requirement that analogues be selected from "the same category," inheres in the popular saying "you can't compare apples and oranges" and the textbook principle "the greater the number of shared properties, the stronger the argument from analogy." I identify roles of domains in biological, linguistic, and legal analogy, supporting the account of law with a computer word search of judicial decisions. I argue that the category treatments within these disciplines cannot be exported to general informal logic, (...)
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  2.  43
    Roy W. Perrett (1997). The Analogical Argument for Animal Pain. Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (1):49-58.
    Philosophical defenders of animal liberation believe that we have direct duties to animals. Typically a presumption of that belief is that animals have the capacity to experience pain and suffering. Notoriously, however, a strand of Western scientific and philosophical thought has held animals to be incapable of experiencing pain, and even today one frequently encounters in discussions of animal liberation expressions of scepticism about whether animals really experience pain. -/- The Analogical Argument for Animal Pain responds to this (...)
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  3.  1
    Andre Juthe (2015). Analogical Argument Schemes and Complex Argument Structure. Informal Logic 35 (3):378-445.
    This paper addresses several issues in argumentation theory. The over-arching goal is to discuss how a theory of analogical argument schemes fits the pragma-dialectical theory of argument schemes and argument structures, and how one should properly reconstruct both single and complex argumentation by analogy. I also propose a unified model that explains how formal valid deductive argumentation relates to argument schemes in general and to analogical argument schemes in particular. The model suggests “scheme-specific-validity” (...)
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  4. Marcello Guarini, The Triple Contract: A Case Study of a Source Blending Analogical Argument.
    One form of analogical argument proceeds by comparing a disputed case with an agreed upon case to try to resolve the dispute. There is a variation on preceding form of argument not yet identified in the theoretical literature. This variation involves multiple sources, and it requires that the sources be combined or blended for the argument to work. Arguments supporting the Triple Contract are shown to possess this structure.
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  5. Don A. Merrell, Hume’s Analogical Argument Against Post-Mortem Survival and Kant’s Transcendental Apperception.
    Hume’s essay “Of the Immortality of the Soul” is a scathing attack on the idea of an afterlife. Though he attends to three types of argument for the immortality of the soul – metaphysical, moral, and physical – I am only interested here in Hume’s attack on metaphysical arguments. Hume’s analogy, I submit, is too weak to sustain his conclusion.
     
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  6.  15
    C. Kenneth Waters (1986). Taking Analogical Inference Seriously: Darwin's Argument From Artificial Selection. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:502 - 513.
    Although historians have carefully examined exactly what role the analogy between artificial and natural selection might have played in Charles Darwin's discovery of natural selection, philosophers have not devoted much attention to the way Darwin employed the analogy to justify his theory. I suggest that philosophers tend to belittle the role that analogies play in the justification of scientific theories because they don't understand the special nature of analogical inference. I present a novel account of analogical argument (...)
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  7.  19
    Catherine S. Frazer (1970). Hume's Criticism and Defense of Analogical Argument. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (2):173-179.
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  8.  10
    Thomas M. Olshewsky (1974). The Analogical Argument for Knowledge of Other Minds Reconsidered. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (January):63-69.
  9. R. O. Anderson (1969). Conclusive Analogical Argument. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 23 (1):44-57.
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  10. Marcello Guarini, On the Limits of the Woods-Hudak Reconstruction of Analogical Argument.
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  11.  13
    Woosuk Park (2008). Isn't the Indispensability Argument Necessarily Analogical? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 41:13-18.
    Both the defenders and the challengers of the indispensability argument seem to ignore the obvious fact that it is meant to be an analogical inference. In this note, I shall draw attention to this fact so as to avoid unnecessary confusions in any future discussion of the indispensability argument. For this purpose, I shall criticize Maddy’s version of the indispensability argument. After having noted that Quinean holism does not have to be one of the necessary premises, (...)
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  12.  14
    Henrike Jansen (2007). Refuting a Standpoint by Appealing to Its Outcomes: Reductio Ad Absurdum Vs. Argument From Consequences. Informal Logic 27 (3):249-266.
    Used informally, the Reductio ad Absurdum (RAA) consists in reasoning appealing to the logically implied, absurd consequences of a hypothetical proposition, in order to refute it. This kind of reasoning resembles the Argument from Consequences, which appeals to causally induced consequences. These types of argument are sometimes confused, since it is not worked out how these different kinds of consequences should be distinguished. In this article it is argued that the logical consequences in RAA-argumentation can take different appearances (...)
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  13.  7
    J. E. Adler (2007). Asymmetrical Analogical Arguments. Argumentation 21 (1):83-92.
    Analogies must be symmetric. If a is like b, then b is like a. So if a has property R, and if R is within the scope of the analogy, then b (probably) has R. However, analogical arguments generally single out, or depend upon, only one of a or b to serve as the basis for the inference. In this respect, analogical arguments are directed by an asymmetry. I defend the importance of this neglected – even when explicitly (...)
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  14.  40
    Gilbert Plumer (2015). On Novels as Arguments. Informal Logic 35 (4):488-507.
    If novels can be arguments, that fact should shape logic or argumentation studies as well as literary studies. Two senses the term ‘narrative argument’ might have are (a) a story that offers an argument, or (b) a distinctive argument form. I consider whether there is a principled way of extracting a novel’s argument in sense (a). Regarding the possibility of (b), Hunt’s view is evaluated that many fables and much fabulist literature inherently, and as wholes, have (...)
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  15. Stephen Prior & Henrik Rosenmeier (1979). Other Minds and the Argument From. Philosophical Investigations 2:12-33.
     
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  16.  5
    Marcello Guarini (2004). A Defense of Non-Deductive Reconstructions of Analogical Arguments (AILACT Essay Competition Winner). Informal Logic 24 (2):153-168.
    Bruce Waller has defended a deductive reconstruction of the kinds of analogical arguments found in ethics, law, and metaphysics. This paper demonstrates the limits of such a reconstruction and argues for an alternative. non-deductive reconstruction. It will be shown that some analogical arguments do not fit Waller's deductive schema, and that such a schema does not allow for an adequate account of the strengths and weaknesses of an analogical argument. The similarities and differences between the account (...)
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  17.  11
    Lilian Bermejo-Luque (2012). A Unitary Schema for Arguments by Analogy. Informal Logic 32 (1):1-24.
    Following a Toulmian account of argument analysis and evaluation, I offer a general unitary schema for, so called, deductive and inductive types of analogical arguments. This schema is able to explain why certain analogical arguments can be said to be deductive, and yet, also defeasible.
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  18.  20
    John Woods (2000). Slippery Slopes and Collapsing Taboos. Argumentation 14 (2):107-134.
    A slippery slope argument is an argument to this twofold effect. First, that if a policy or practice P is permitted, then we lack the dialectical resources to demonstrate that a similar policy or practice P* is not permissible. Since P* is indeed not permissible, we should not endorse policy or practice P. At the heart of such arguments is the idea of dialectical impotence, the inability to stop the acceptance of apparently small deviations from a heretofore secure (...)
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  19.  11
    Fábio Perin Shecaira (2013). Analogical Arguments in Ethics and Law: A Defence of Deductivism. Informal Logic 33 (3):406-437.
    The paper provides a qualified defence of Bruce Waller’s deductivist schema for a priori analogical arguments in ethics and law. One crucial qualification is that the schema represents analogical arguments as complexes composed of one deductive inference but also of one non-deductive subargument. Another important qualification is that the schema is informed by normative assumptions regarding the conditions that an analogical argument must satisfy in order for it to count as an optimal instance of its kind. (...)
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  20. Kenneth Olson & Gilbert Plumer (2002). What Constitutes a Formal Analogy? In Hans V. Hansen, Christopher W. Tindale, J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson & Robert C. Pinto (eds.), Argumentation and its Applications [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation 1-8.
    There is ample justification for having analogical material in standardized tests for graduate school admission, perhaps especially for law school. We think that formal-analogy questions should compare different scenarios whose structure is the same in terms of the number of objects and the formal properties of their relations. The paper deals with this narrower question of how legitimately to have formal analogy test items, and the broader question of what constitutes a formal analogy in general.
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  21.  16
    Steven Gamboa (2008). In Defense of Analogical Reasoning. Informal Logic 28 (3):229-241.
    I offer a defense of ana-logical accounts of scientific models by meeting certain logical objections to the legitimacy of analogical reasoning. I examine an argument by Joseph Agassi that purports to show that all putative cases of analogical inference succumb to the following dilemma: either (1) the reasoning remains hopelessly vague and thus establishes no conclusion, or (2) can be analyzed into a logically preferable non-analogical form. In rebuttal, I offer a class of scientific models for (...)
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  22.  6
    Zbigniew Tworak (2006). Analogy and Diagonal Argument. Logic and Logical Philosophy 15 (1):39-66.
    In this paper, I try to accomplish two goals. The first is to provide a general characterization of a method of proofs called — in mathematics — the diagonal argument. The second is to establish that analogical thinking plays an important role also in mathematical creativity. Namely, mathematical research make use of analogies regarding general strategies of proof. Some of mathematicians, for example George Polya, argued that deductions is impotent without analogy. What I want to show is that (...)
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  23.  20
    Gilbert Edward Plumer (1983). Now. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    The dissertation is a study primarily in analytic metaphysics. The emphasis is on time, and the focus, on the whole, is on the notion of Now. In the first chapter I consider Now as it figures in singular demonstrative reference by giving an exposition and partially Kantian refutation of Hegel's argument that such reference is impossible. The ability to so-refer is the ability to mean and express 'this', i.e., what is here and now to me. Hegel's central mistake was (...)
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  24. W. W. Mellor (1956). Three Problems About Other Minds. Mind 65 (April):200-217.
  25. Stuart N. Hampshire (1952). The Analogy of Feeling. Mind 61 (January):1-12.
    In this article the author is concerned with the justification of the knowledge of other minds by virtue of statements of other people's feelings based upon inductive arguments of any ordinary pattern as being inferences from the observed to the unobserved of a familiar and accepted form. The author argues that they are not logically peculiar or invalid, When considered as inductive arguments. The author also proposes that solipsism is a linguistically absurd thesis, While at the same time stopping to (...)
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  26.  50
    Alvin Plantinga (1966). Induction and Other Minds. Review of Metaphysics 19 (March):441-61.
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  27.  52
    Jerome I. Gellman (1974). Inductive Evidence for Other Minds. Philosophical Studies 25 (July):323-336.
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  28.  27
    Thomas Young (1993). Analogical Reasoning and Easy Rescue Cases. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:327-339.
    The purpose of this article is to determine whether analogical reasoning can supply a basis for believing that we have a moral obligation to rescue strangers. The paper will focus on donating cadaver organs. I construct a moral analogical argument involving an easy rescue case and organ donation. Various alleged relevant differences between the cases are examined and rejected. Finally, what I cal l “the ownership dilemma” is introduced and I conclude that this dilemma is inescapable. Thus, (...)
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  29.  37
    Bruce Aune (1963). On Thought and Feeling. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (January):1-12.
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  30.  17
    Stephen Prior & Henrik Rosenmeier (1979). Other Minds and the Arment From Analogy. Philosophical Investigations 2 (4):12-33.
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  31.  23
    Ray H. Dotterer (1940). Our Certainty of Other Minds. Philosophy of Science 7 (October):442-450.
  32.  3
    Mary Hesse (1995). Habermas and the Force of Dialectical Argument. History of European Ideas 21 (3):367-378.
    In his theory of rational discourse, Habermas has made essential use of the concept of 'force of the better argument'. He does not explicitly discuss the theories of meaning and of inference that must underpin this concept, but usually construes it in terms of univocal meaning and propositional inference. These assumptions are challenged by means of examples from the use of metaphor and analogical argument in science, and it is suggested that a generalisation of such arguments applies (...)
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  33.  13
    Mark Wynn (1996). A Priori Judgments and the Argument From Design. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 39 (3):169 - 185.
    At the outset of this discussion, I undertook to present an argument from design which would follow Swinburne's example in making use of a priori judgments, while avoiding some of the objections which have been posed in response to his treatment of these issues. So we need to ask: how does this approach to the question of design compare with Swinburne's?Swinburne argues that a chaotic world is a priori more likely than an ordered world: this consideration provides one central (...)
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  34. Scott Brewer (1997). Valuing Reasons: Analogy and Epistemic Deference in Legal Argument. Dissertation, Harvard University
    This thesis addresses two enduring issues in legal theory-- rationality and its association with rule of law values--by offering detailed models of two patterns of legal reasoning. One is reasoning by analogy. The other is the inference process that legal reasoners use when they defer epistemically to scientific experts in the course of reaching legal decisions. Discussions in both chapters reveal that the inference pattern known as "abduction" is a deeply important element of many legal inferences, including analogy and epistemic (...)
     
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  35. Margaret Chatterjee (1963). Our Knowledge Of Other Selves. Asia Publishing.
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  36. Marcello Guarini, A Defence of Non-Deductive Reconstructions of Analogical Arguments.
    Bruce Waller has defended a deductive reconstruction of the kinds of analogical arguments found in ethics, law, and metaphysics. This paper demonstrates the limits of such a reconstruction and argues for an alternative, nondeductive reconstruction. It will be shown that some analogical arguments do not fit Waller's deductive schema, and that such a schema does not allow for an adequate account of the strengths and weaknesses of an analogical argument. The similarities and differences between the account (...)
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  37.  16
    Matthew Baddorf (forthcoming). An Argument From Divine Beauty Against Divine Simplicity. Topoi:1-8.
    Some versions of the doctrine of divine simplicity imply that God lacks really differentiated parts. I present a new argument against these views based on divine beauty. The argument proceeds as follows: God is beautiful. If God is beautiful, then this beauty arises from some structure. If God’s beauty arises from a structure, then God possesses really differentiated parts. If these premises are true, then divine simplicity is false. I argue for each of the argument’s premises and (...)
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  38. Jon Wetlesen (1999). The Moral Status of Beings Who Are Not Persons: A Casuistic Argument. Environmental Values 8 (3):287 - 323.
    This paper addresses the question: Who or what can have a moral status in the sense that we have direct moral duties to them? It argues for a biocentric answer which ascribes inherent moral status value to all individual living organisms. This position must be defended against an anthropocentric position. The argument from marginal cases propounded by Tom Regan and Peter Singer for this purpose is criticised as defective, and a different argument is proposed. The biocentric position developed (...)
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  39. Imran Aijaz & Markus Weidler (2007). Some Critical Reflections on the Hiddenness Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (1):1 - 23.
    J.L. Schellenberg’s Argument from Divine Hiddenness maintains that if a perfectly loving God exists, then there is no non-resistant non-belief. Given that such nonbelief exists, however, it follows that there is no perfectly loving God. To support the conditional claim, Schellenberg presents conceptual and analogical considerations, which we subject to critical scrutiny. We also evaluate Schellenberg’s claim that the belief that God exists is logically necessary for entering into a relationship with the Divine. Finally, we turn to possible (...)
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  40.  47
    Fabrizio Macagno & Douglas Walton (2009). Argument From Analogy in Law, the Classical Tradition, and Recent Theories. Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (2):154-182.
    Argument from analogy is a common and formidable form of reasoning in law and in everyday conversation. Although there is substantial literature on the subject, according to a recent survey ( Juthe 2005) there is little fundamental agreement on what form the argument should take, or on how it should be evaluated. Th e lack of conformity, no doubt, stems from the complexity and multiplicity of forms taken by arguments that fall under the umbrella of analogical reasoning (...)
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  41.  82
    Daniel Steel & S. Kedzie Hall (2010). A New Approach to Argument by Analogy: Extrapolation and Chain Graphs. Philosophy of Science 77 (5):1058-1069.
    In order to make scientific results relevant to practical decision making, it is often necessary to transfer a result obtained in one set of circumstances—an animal model, a computer simulation, an economic experiment—to another that may differ in relevant respects—for example, to humans, the global climate, or an auction. Such inferences, which we can call extrapolations, are a type of argument by analogy. This essay sketches a new approach to analogical inference that utilizes chain graphs, which resemble directed (...)
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  42.  50
    Klaas J. Kraay (2003). Philo's Argument for Divine Amorality Reconsidered. Hume Studies 29 (2):283-304.
    A central tactic in Philo’s criticism of the design argument is the introduction of several alternative hypotheses, each of which is alleged to explain apparent design at least as well as Cleanthes’ analogical inference to an intelligent designer. In Part VI, Philo proposes that the world “…is an animal, and the Deity is the soul of the world, actuating it, and actuated by it” (DNR 6.3; 171); in Part VII, he suggests that “…it is a palpable and egregious (...)
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  43.  11
    Ronald Loui, An Argument Game.
    This game3 was designed to investigate protocols and strategies for resourcebounded disputation. The rules presented here correspond very closely to the problem of controlling search in an actual program. The computer program on which the game is based is LMNOP. It is a LISP system designed to produce arguments and counterarguments from a set of statutory rules and a corpus of precedents, and applied to legal and quasi-legal reasoning. LMNOP was co-designed by a researcher in AI knowledge representation and by (...)
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  44.  15
    Joseph P. Li Vecchi (2010). Analogical Deduction Via a Calculus of Predicables. Philo 13 (1):53-66.
    This article identifies and formalizes the logical features of analogous terms that justify their use in deduction. After a survey of doctrines in Aristotle, Aquinas, and Cajetan, the criteria of “analogy of proper proportionality” are symbolized in first-order predicate logic. A common genus justifies use of a common term, but does not provide the inferential link required for deduction. Rather, the respective differentiae foster this link through their identical proportion. A natural-language argument by analogy is formalized so as to (...)
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  45.  21
    Kevin D. Ashley (2002). An AI Model of Case-Based Legal Argument From a Jurisprudential Viewpoint. Artificial Intelligence and Law 10 (1-3):163-218.
    This article describes recent jurisprudential accountsof analogical legal reasoning andcompares them in detail to the computational modelof case-based legal argument inCATO. The jurisprudential models provide a theoryof relevance based on low-levellegal principles generated in a process ofcase-comparing reflective adjustment. Thejurisprudential critique focuses on the problemsof assigning weights to competingprinciples and dealing with erroneously decidedprecedents. CATO, a computerizedinstructional environment, employs ArtificialIntelligence techniques to teach lawstudents how to make basic legal argumentswith cases. The computational modelhelps students test legal hypotheses againsta (...)
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  46.  22
    Hermann Deuser & Dennis Beach (1995). Hume's Pragmaticist Argument for the Reality of God. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 9 (1):1 - 13.
    The author examines Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion to discover a variant of the usual teleological argument that abandons reliance on analogical reasoning. This second version, never refuted in the Dialogues, is termed "pragmaticist" in Peirce's sense. It relies on an abductive hypothesis that claims not logical proof but the power of instinctual conviction. The Dialogues' espousal of sound common sense may then be viewed as an imperfectly articulated precursor of Peirce's pragmaticist argument for the reality rather (...)
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  47.  2
    Maurice A. Finocchiaro, Meta-Argumentation in Hume’s Critique of the Design Argument.
    Although Hume’s critique of the design argument is a powerful non-inductive meta-argument, the main line of critical reasoning is not analogical but rather a complex meta-argument. It consists of two parts, one interpretive, the other evaluative. The critical meta-argument advances twelve criticisms: that the design argument is weak because two of its three premises are justified by inadequate subarguments; because its main inference embodies four flaws; and because the conclusion is in itself problematic for (...)
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  48. Alexander Pruss, Programs, Bugs, DNA and a Design Argument Alexander R. Pruss May 27, 2004.
    I argue that an examination of the analogy between the notion of a bug and that of a genetic defect supports an analogy not just between a computer program and DNA, but between a computer program designed by a programmer and DNA. This provides an analogical teleological argument for the existence of a highly intelligent designer.
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  49.  6
    Paul Bouissac (2008). The Evolution of Priming in Cognitive Competencies: To What Extent is Analogical Reasoning Adaptive? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):380-381.
    This commentary questions the general assumptions concerning the cognitive value of analogical reasoning on which the argument developed by Leech et al. appears to rest. In order to better assess the findings of their meta-analysis, it shifts the perspective from development to evolution, and frames their concern within a broader issue.
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  50.  2
    Scott Matthews (1999). Arguments, Texts, and Contexts: Anselm's Argument and the Friars. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 8 (1):83-104.
    The contrast between the reception of Anselms argument in the prior acceptance of univocal or analogical accounts of being. 1 P. A. Daniels argued that the prerequisites for Bonaventureontologicals argument among the first scholastics of the thirteenth century depended upon their allegiance to Augustinian or Aristotelian traditions. 3 Anton Pegis did the same when he insisted that recovery of the Anselmian argument in its original form involved stripping away the Aristotelian framework in terms of which the (...)
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