Search results for 'Anatman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  44
    Stephen Harris (2011). Does Anātman Rationally Entail Altruism? On Bodhicaryāvatāra 8: 101-103. Journal of Buddhist Ethics 18.
    In the eighth chapter of the Bodhicaryāvatāra, the Buddhist philosopher Śāntideva has often been interpreted as offering an argument that accepting the ultimate nonexistence of the self (anātman) rationally entails a commitment to altruism, the view that one should care equally for self and others. In this essay, I consider reconstructions of Śāntideva’s argument by contemporary scholars Paul Williams, Mark Siderits and John Pettit. I argue that all of these various reconfigurations of the argument fail to be convincing. This suggests (...)
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  2. Srinivasa Rao (1976). Anātman Anirvacanīyakhyāti and Advaita: A Reexamination. Philosophy East and West 26 (1):71-74.
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  3.  57
    Bina Gupta, Ātman_ (Self) and _Anātman (No-Self): A Possible Reconciliation.
    In most common expositions of Indian philosophy the two traditions: self and no-self - are taken to be mutually incompatible. The former, having its origin in the Upaniṣads, finds expression in all āstikadarśanas , though its clearest and most important exposition is found in Advaita Vedānta. The latter having its origin in the teachings of the Buddha finds varied expressions in different schools of Buddhism. The Advaita Vedānta accepts ātman and rejects anattā ; the Buddhists argue for anattā and reject (...)
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  4.  10
    Masako Odagawa (1975). Die "anātman"-Theorie des Buddhismus. Perspektiven der Philosophie 1:245-265.
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  5.  10
    Robert A. Holland (1995). Toward a Resolution of Śankara's Ātmavidya and the Buddhist Doctrine of Anātman. International Philosophical Quarterly 35 (3):301-318.
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  6.  10
    Kenneth K. Inada (1971). Whitehead's 'Actual Entity' and the Buddha's Anātman. Philosophy East and West 21 (3):303-316.
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  7.  16
    Irina Kuznetsova, Jonardon Ganeri & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (eds.) (2012). Hindu and Buddhist Ideas in Dialogue: Self and No-Self. Ashgate.
    The debates between various Buddhist and Hindu philosophical systems about the existence, definition and nature of self, occupy a central place in the history of Indian philosophy and religion.
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  8. T. A. P. Aryaratne (1974). The Philosophy of Anatta: A Reconstruction of the Real Teaching of Gotama. Sri Lanka Rationalist Association.
     
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  9.  31
    Lynn A. De Silva (1975). The Problem of the Self in Buddhism and Christianity. Study Centre for Religion and Society.
  10. Matthew MacKenzie (2010). Enacting the Self: Buddhist and Enactivist Approaches to the Emergence of the Self. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):75-99.
    In this paper, I take up the problem of the self through bringing together the insights, while correcting some of the shortcomings, of Indo–Tibetan Buddhist and enactivist accounts of the self. I begin with an examination of the Buddhist theory of non-self ( anātman ) and the rigorously reductionist interpretation of this doctrine developed by the Abhidharma school of Buddhism. After discussing some of the fundamental problems for Buddhist reductionism, I turn to the enactive approach to philosophy of mind and (...)
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  11.  31
    Mario D'Amato (2013). Buddhist Fictionalism. Sophia 52 (3):409-424.
    Questions regarding what exists are central to various forms of Buddhist philosophy, as they are to many traditions of philosophy. Interestingly, there is perhaps a clearer consensus in Buddhist thought regarding what does not exist than there may be regarding precisely what does exist, at least insofar as the doctrine of anātman (no self, absence of self) is taken to be a fundamental Buddhist doctrine. It may be noted that many forms of Mahāyāna Buddhist philosophy in particular are considered to (...)
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  12.  2
    Ann A. Pang-White (2016). Non-Self, Agency, and Women: Buddhism’s Modern Transformation. In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender (London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic). 331-356.
    In “Non-self, Agency, and Women: Buddhism’s Modern Transformation,” Ann A. Pang-White argues that “non-self (anātman 無我)” and “emptiness (śūnyatā 空)” necessarily entail nonduality. Buddha nature is neither male nor female. Nonetheless, conflicting teachings are found in various Theravada and Mahayana texts. The more conservative texts have historically resulted in long-standing patriarchal practices: Buddhist nuns receive much less respect and financial support than monks, often facing the possibility of extinction. In Taiwan, however, in a complete reversal, Buddhist nuns outnumber male monks (...)
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  13.  27
    Anke Haarmann (2008). Hybrid Identities. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 18:49-57.
    Looking at contemporary Japanese images of the self and how Japanese scholars have conceptualised the notion of the subjectivity three remarkable concepts of “the self” can be identified and distinguished from another: the Inner Self, the Political Self, the Social Self. In my paper I will discuss these concepts by high lightening their hybridity, plurality and their emphasis on the identity as an effect of self-realization. I shall argue that the investigation in the Japaneseunderstanding of the self is particularly fruitful (...)
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  14.  15
    Jeffrey Morgan (2013). Buddhism and Autonomy‐Facilitating Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):509-523.
    This article argues that Buddhists can consistently support autonomy as an educational ideal. The article defines autonomy as a matter of thinking and acting according to principles that one has oneself endorsed, showing the relationship between this ideal and the possession of an enduring self. Three central Buddhist doctrines of conditioned arising, impermanence and anatman are examined, showing a prima facie conflict between autonomy and Buddhist philosophy. Drawing on the ‘two truths’ theory of Nagarjuna, it is then shown that (...)
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  15.  30
    Jennifer Mcmahon Railey (1997). Dependent Origination and the Dual-Nature of the Japanese Aesthetic. Asian Philosophy 7 (2):123 – 132.
    As most commentators on Japanese aesthetics agree, the Japanese aesthetic is pervaded by a profound affirmation of things in their suchness or original uniqueness, and at the same time is tinged with an element of sadness or melancholy. While the responses of affirmation and melancholy seem rather subjective and may—at first glance—appear inconsistent with Buddhist notions like anatman, or non-self and the Buddhist demand for non-attachment, I shall argue that a more careful reading of certain Buddhist doctrines, specifically the (...)
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  16.  13
    Denis Noble, The 3rd World Conference on Buddhism and Science (WCBS).
    Systems Biology is the study of the interactions between the elements (genes, proteins and other molecules) of living systems. Genes do not act in isolation either from each other or from the environment, and so I replace the metaphor of the selfish gene with metaphors that emphasise the processes involved rather than the molecular biological components. This may seem a simple shift of viewpoint. In fact it is revolutionary. Nothing remains the same. There is no 'book of life', nor are (...)
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  17.  11
    John W. M. Krummel (2005). Praxis of the Middle. International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (4):517-535.
    This paper considers the controversy surrounding the Buddhist doctrine of “no-self” (anattā, anātman), and especially the question of whether the Buddha himself meant by it unequivocally the ontological denial of the self. The emergence of this doctrine is connected with the Buddha’s attempt to forge a “middle way” that avoids the extreme views of “eternalism” in regards to the soul and “annihilationism” of the soul at bodily death. By looking at the earliest works of the Pāli canon, three of the (...)
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  18. Richard King (1989). ??Nyat? And Aj?Ti: Absolutism and the Philosophies of N?G?Rjuna and Gau $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{D}$$ Ap?Da. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 17 (4):385-405.
    Gau $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{d}$$ apāda, whilst accepting much of the argumentation and style of Nāgārjuna's philosophy, aligns himself firmly with the ātman/ svabhāvatā tradition of Vedānta; his view of ātman is inspired by an absorption of Nāgārjuna's dialectical method. For both Nāgārjuna and Gau $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{d}$$ apāda, the basis of both the Madhyamaka and Advaitic perspectives is the impossibility of change (na anyathabhāva). For Nāgārjuna this entails ni $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{h}$$ svabhāvatā, for Gau $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{d}$$ apāda it means absolute svabhāvatā. Both accept that the belief in (...)
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  19. Yvanka B. Raynova & Susanne Moser (eds.) (2005). Das integrale und das gebrochene Ganze: Zum 100. Geburtstag von Leo Gabriel. Peter Lang.
    Dieser Band präsentiert, gemeinsam mit anderen Beiträgen, die anlässlich der Gedenkfeier zum 100. Geburtstag von Leo Gabriel gehaltenen Vorträge am Institut für Philosophie der Universität Wien. Lange vor den gegenwärtigen Bestrebungen zu einer europäischen Integration hat Gabriel die Entwicklung der geistigen Gestalten Europas und das Verhältnis von Einheit und Vielheit integrativ zu erfassen versucht. Die Autorinnen und Autoren erörtern die Quellen sowie die Aktualität des integralen Denkens und vergleichen es mit phänomenologisch-existentialistischen, hermeneutischen, strukturalistischen und postmodernen Theorien. Überdies beinhaltet der Band (...)
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