Search results for 'Anatomy history' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Alan G. Soble (2003). The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science. Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text is examined in detail in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  10
    Charles T. Wolfe & Benjamin Goldberg (2012). Luuc Kooijmans.Death Defied: The Anatomy Lessons of Frederik Ruysch, Trans. Diane Webb. Leiden: Brill, 2011. History of Science and Medicine Library, Vol. 18. Pp. Xvi+472, Index. $169.00. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):177-182.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  82
    M. A. Crowther (1989). Reviews : W. F. Bynum, Roy Porter, and Michael Shepherd (Eds), The Anatomy of Madness: Essays in the History of Psychiatry, Volume III, The Asylum and its Psychiatry, London: Routledge, 1988, £35.00, Ix + 353 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 2 (3):392-394.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  1
    Mario A. Di Gregorio (1993). Jacob W. Gruber and John C. Thackray Richard Owen Commemoration: Three Studies. London: Natural History Museum Publications, 1992. Pp. Ix + 181. ISBN 0-565-01109-X. £29.95.Richard Owen The Hunterian Lectures in Comparative Anatomy, May and June 1837, Edited with Introduction and Commentary by P. R. Sloan. London: Natural History Publications, 1992. Pp. Xvi + 340. ISBN 0-565-01106, £37.50 , 0-565-011448, £15.95. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 26 (3):365.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Jerry Stannard (1966). The Anatomy of Plants: With an Idea of a Philosophical History of Plants and Several Other Lectures Read Before the Royal Society by Nehemiah Grew. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 57:505-506.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Steve Sturdy (2011). A.W. Bates, The Anatomy of Robert Knox: Murder, Mad Science and Medical Regulation in Nineteenth-Century Edinburgh. Brighton: Sussex Academic Press, 2010. Pp. Ix+228. ISBN 978-1-84519-38-2. £39.95 .Lisa Rosner, The Anatomy Murders: Being the True and Spectacular History of Edinburgh's Notorious Burke and Hare and of the Man of Science Who Abetted Them in the Commission of Their Most Heinous Crimes. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2010. Pp. Vi+328. ISBN 978-0-8122-4191-4. £19.50. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 44 (1):133-134.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Pek Van Andel (1994). Anatomy of the Unsought Finding. Serendipity: Origin, History, Domains, Traditions, Appearances, Patterns and Programmability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):631-648.
    I define serendipity as the art of making an unsought finding. And I propose an overview of my collection of serendipities, the largest yet assembled, chiefly in science and technology, but also in art, by giving a list of ‘serendipity patterns’. Although my list of ‘patterns’ is just a list and not a classification, it serves to introduce a new and possibly stimulating perspective on the old subject of serendipity. Knowledge of these ‘serendipity patterns’ might help in expecting also the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  8.  27
    Pek Van Andel (1994). Anatomy of the Unsought Finding. Serendipity: Origin, History, Domains, Traditions, Appearances, Patterns and Programmability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):631 - 648.
    I define serendipity as the art of making an unsought finding. And I propose an overview of my collection of serendipities, the largest yet assembled, chiefly in science and technology, but also in art, by giving a list of 'serendipity patterns'. Although my list of 'patterns' is just a list and not a classification, it serves to introduce a new and possibly stimulating perspective on the old subject of serendipity. Knowledge of these 'serendipity patterns' might help in expecting also the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  1
    Ian Tattersall, Kent R. Weeks & Bent Otte Grandjean (1971). The Physiological Basis of the Fine Arts: A TheoryArt and Anatomy of Archaic Egypt: The Shen Principle Explained, with FormulasA Concise History of the Stereometry and the Body Measures, According to the Contemporary Sources, From Archaic Egypt to the Viking Age. Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (2):294.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. S. T. Loseby (1998). Bernard S. Bachrach, The Anatomy of a Little War: A Diplomatic and Military History of the Gundovald Affair (568–586). (History and Warfare.) Boulder, Colo.; San Francisco; and Oxford: Westview Press, 1994. Pp. Xxiii, 283; Genealogical Tables, Maps, and Figures. $49.85. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (2):462-463.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  4
    Pek Andevanl (1994). Anatomy of the Unsought Finding. Serendipity: Orgin, History, Domains, Traditions, Appearances, Patterns and Programmability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):631-648.
    I define serendipity as the art of making an unsought finding. And I propose an overview of my collection of serendipities, the largest yet assembled, chiefly in science and technology, but also in art, by giving a list of ‘serendipity patterns’. Although my list of ‘patterns’ is just a list and not a classification, it serves to introduce a new and possibly stimulating perspective on the old subject of serendipity. Knowledge of these ‘serendipity patterns’ might help in expecting also the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  2
    Ralph White (1986). The Anatomy of a Victorian Debate: An Essay in the History of Liberal Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 34 (1):38 - 65.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. F. J. Cole & Herbert Friedmann (1948). History of Comparative Anatomy. From Aristotle to the Eighteenth CenturyFrancis J. Cole. Isis 38 (3/4):264-266.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Gerald N. Grob (1986). The Anatomy of Madness: Essays in the History of PsychiatryW. F. Bynum Roy Porter Michael Shepherd. Isis 77 (2):363-364.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Sherman M. Kuhn (1968). The Middle English Translation of Guy de Chauliac's Anatomy, with Guy's Essay on the History of Medicine. Björn Wallner. Speculum 43 (3):552-556.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. S. T. Loseby (1998). The Anatomy of a Little War: A Diplomatic and Military History of the Gundovald Affair .Bernard S. Bachrach. Speculum 73 (2):462-463.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. John Skandalakis (1998). A History of Anatomy: The Post-Vesalian Era By T.V.N. Persaud. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (1):146-149.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Jerry Stannard (1966). The Anatomy of Plants: With an Idea of a Philosophical History of Plants and Several Other Lectures Read Before the Royal SocietyNehemiah Grew. Isis 57 (4):505-506.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. George Vid Tomashevich & Sherwood A. Wakeman (1981). History, the Anatomy of Time: The Final Phase of Sunlight. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (1):137-139.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Míċeál F. Vaughan (2003). Anita Obermeier, The History and Anatomy of Auctorial Self-Criticism in the European Middle Ages. Amsterdam and Atlanta, Ga.: Rodopi, 1999. Paper. Pp. 314; Black-and-White Figures. $55.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (1):236-239.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Míċeál F. Vaughan (2003). The History and Anatomy of Auctorial Self-Criticism in the European Middle AgesAnita Obermeier. Speculum 78 (1):236-239.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Ralph White (1986). The Anatomy of a Victorian Debate: An Essay in the History of Liberal Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 34 (1):38-65.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  20
    Dirk Stemerding (1993). How to Make Oneself Nature's Spokesman? A Latourian Account of Classification in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century Natural History. Biology and Philosophy 8 (2):193-223.
    Classification in eighteenth-century natural history was marked by a battle of systems. The Linnaean approach to classification was severely criticized by those naturalists who aspired to a truly natural system. But how to make oneself nature''s spokesman? In this article I seek to answer that question using the approach of the French anthropologist of science Bruno Latour in a discussion of the work of the French naturalists Buffon and Cuvier in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century. These naturalists followed (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  3
    Jeff Loveland (2006). Another Daubenton, Another Histoire naturelle. Journal of the History of Biology 39 (3):457 - 491.
    Already in his lifetime, the naturalist Louis-Jean-Marie Daubenton was dramatically contrasted with his patron and collaborator on the Histoire naturelle (Natural History), Buffon figuring as stylish and prone to hypothesizing, Daubenton as narrow and unwilling to generalize. This caricatural image of Daubenton as an anti-Buffon persists even now. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the development of Daubenton's reputation and then to moderate it by showing that he was not so averse to theorizing or generalization as (...) has made him. Evidence for this argument comes from the Histoire naturelle and from unpublished manuscripts proving that he originally planned to contribute two synthetic treatises on animal anatomy to the Histoire naturelle. Reconstituting the series as he envisaged it allows a more balanced portrait of one of the founders of comparative anatomy and a look behind the scenes of one of the eighteenth century's most important scientific publications. (shrink)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  1
    H. LeGuyader (1999). [The concept of an organizational plan: some aspects of its history]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (3-4):339-379.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Frank Slaby, Susan K. Mccune & Robert W. Summers (1994). Gross Anatomy in the Practice of Medicine.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  8
    Evelleen Richards (1989). The "Moral Anatomy" of Robert Knox: The Interplay Between Biological and Social Thought in Victorian Scientific Naturalism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 22 (3):373 - 436.
    Historians are now generally agreed that the Darwinian recognition and institutionalization of the polygenist position was more than merely nominal.194 Wallace, Vogt, and Huxley had led the way, and we may add Galton (1869) to the list of those leading Darwinians who incorporated a good deal of polygenist thinking into their interpretions of human history and racial differences.195 Eventually “Mr. Darwin himself,” as Hunt had suggested he might, consolidated the Darwinian endorsement of many features of polygenism. Darwin's Descent of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  28.  2
    Christiane Sinding (1989). The History of Resistant Rickets: A Model for Understanding the Growth of Biomedical Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 22 (3):461 - 495.
    Two essential periods may be identified in the early stages of the history of vitamin D-resistant rickets. The first was the period during which a very well known deficiency disease, rickets, acquired a scientific status: this required the development of unifying principles to confer upon the newly developing science of pathology a doctrine without which it would have been condemned to remain a collection of unrelated facts with very little practical application. One first such unifying principle was provided by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  4
    Patricia Anne Baker, Han Nijdam & Karine van 'T. Land (eds.) (2011). Medicine and Space: Body, Surroundings, and Borders in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Brill.
    The papers in this volume question how perceptions of space influenced understandings of the body and its functions, illness and treatment, and the surrounding natural and built environments in relation to health in the classical and ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Peter Goodrich (1995). Oedipus Lex: Psychoanalysis, History, Law. University of California Press.
    _Oedipus Lex_ offers an original and evocative reading of legal history and institutional practice in the light of psychoanalysis and aesthetics. It explores the unconscious of law through a wealth of historical and contemporary examples. Peter Goodrich provides an anatomy of law's melancholy and boredom, of addiction to law, of legal repressions, and the aesthetics of jurisprudence. He retraces the genealogy of law and invokes the failures and exclusions—the poets, women, and outsiders—that legal science has left in its (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  31.  10
    Ian Glynn (1999). An Anatomy of Thought the Origin and Machinery of Mind. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Amazon.com Love, fear, hope, calculus, and game shows-how do all these spring from a few delicate pounds of meat? Neurophysiologist Ian Glynn lays the foundation for answering this question in his expansive An Anatomy of Thought, but stops short of committing to one particular theory. The book is a pleasant challenge, presenting the reader with the latest research and thinking about neuroscience and how it relates to various models of consciousness. Combining the aim of a textbook with the style (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  32.  5
    James S. Terry (1985). The Humanities and Gross Anatomy: Forgotten Alternatives. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 6 (2):90-98.
    Researchers in medical education have extensively studied negative reactions to gross anatomy, sometimes grouped under the term “the cadaver experience.” Although there has been disagreement about the extent and importance of such phenomena, several attempts at curricular reform have been designed to “humanize” the student-cadaver encounter. However, some obvious sources linking gross anatomy and the humanities have been consistently overlooked. Such sources—from the history of art, the history of anatomy, and autobiographical and imaginative literature—not only (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  1
    Mary G. Winkler (1989). Tragic Figures: Thoughts on the Visual Arts and Anatomy. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (1):5-12.
    The illustrated anatomical works of Andreas Vesalius, now icons of medical history, exemplified Renaissance humanists' attitudes toward the human condition. Methods of teaching medical students gross anatomy have evolved from the attitudes and methods of Renaissance scientist-scholars. The work of Vesalius is crucial to understanding the revolution in early modern medicine, for not only is it devoted to minute observation and exploration of the human body, but also to translating new knowledge by means of art. In the process (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  4
    Olivier Lagueux (2003). Geoffroy's Giraffe: The Hagiography of a Charismatic Mammal. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):225 - 247.
    In 1826, the Pasha of Egypt offered to the King Charles X an unusual present: a living giraffe. While offering remarkable animals was a common practice among monarchs, the choice of a giraffe was somewhat extraordinary since it was the first representative of its kind to set foot in France. The Royal Menagerie of the Paris Muséum national d'histoire naturelle was asked to oversee the transportation of this precious mammal and Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, one of its professors, was sent to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  2
    Allister Neher (2011). Robert Knox and the Anatomy of Beauty. Medical Humanities 37 (1):46-50.
    Robert Knox (1791–1862) is typically remembered as the Edinburgh anatomist to whom the murderers Burke and Hare sold the bodies of their victims. This association brought Knox infamy and damaged his life and career. Before the Burke and Hare scandal, Knox was one of the most famous, original and influential anatomists in Britain. He was also something of a dandy with a sophisticated appreciation of the visual arts. His most significant writings on artistic subjects were his books A Manual of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Jacalyn Duffin (1995). Infiltrating the Curriculum: An Integrative Approach to History for Medical Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 16 (3):155-174.
    I believe that the purpose of history in a medical school can be related to two simple goals: first, to make students a bit skeptical about everything else they are to be taught in the other lectures—skepticism fosters humility and life-long learning; second, to make them aware that medical history is a research discipline as compelling as any of the basic and clinical sciences they are traditionally taught. In the fall of 1988, I was given an opportunity to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Janet Gyatso (2015). Being Human in a Buddhist World: An Intellectual History of Medicine in Early Modern Tibet. Cup.
    Critically exploring medical thought in a cultural milieu with no discernible influence from the European Enlightenment, _Being Human_ reveals an otherwise unnoticed intersection of early modern sensibilities and religious values in traditional Tibetan medicine. It further studies the adaptation of Buddhist concepts and values to medical concerns and suggests important dimensions of Buddhism's role in the development of Asian and global civilization. Through its unique focus and sophisticated reading of source materials,_ Being Human_ adds a crucial chapter in the larger (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. William Whewell (2011). History of the Inductive Sciences: Volume 3: From the Earliest to the Present Times. Cambridge University Press.
    A central figure in Victorian science, William Whewell held professorships in Mineralogy and Moral Philosophy at Trinity College, Cambridge, before becoming Master of the college in 1841. His mathematical textbooks, such as A Treatise on Dynamics, were instrumental in bringing French analytical methods into British science. This three-volume history, first published in 1837, is one of Whewell's most famous works. Taking the 'acute, but fruitless, essays of Greek philosophy' as a starting point, it provides a history of the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Christopher E. Cosans (1997). Galen's Critique of Rationalist and Empiricist Anatomy. Journal of the History of Biology 30 (1):35 - 54.
    This article explores Galen's analysis of and response to the Rationalist and Empiricist medical sects. It argues that his interest in their debate concerning the epistemology of medicine and anatomy was key to his advancement of an experimental methodology.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  2
    M. Mandelbaum (1979). The Anatomy of Historical Knowledge. Philosophical Review 88 (4):663-668.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  41.  27
    A. Cunningham (2002). The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - I: Old Physiology-the Pen. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (4):631-665.
    It is argued that the disciplinary identity of anatomy and physiology before 1800 are unknown to us due to the subsequent creation, success and historiographical dominance of a different discipline-experimental physiology. The first of these two papers deals with the identity of physiology from its revival in the 1530s, and demonstrates that it was a theoretical, not an experimental, discipline, achieved with the mind and the pen, not the hand and the knife. The physiological work of Jean Fernel, Albrecht (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  42. Michael T. Ghiselin & Stephen Jay Gould (2002). An Autobiographical Anatomy. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):285 - 291.
    An 'anatomy' is a literary work that treats a particul.1r topic at great length and in minute detail. Viewed as a contribution to that genre, this massive and prolix tome may be read with patience and also with sympathy for its author. Gould diccl around the time that it was published, and the book is a fitting monument to his life's work. Because he goes into so much detail, providing an immense amount..
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  17
    A. Cunningham (2003). The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - II: Old Anatomy-the Sword. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):51-76.
    Following the exploration of the disciplinary identity of physiology before 1800 in the previous paper of this pair, the present paper seeks to recover the complementary identity of the discipline of anatomy before 1800. The manual, artisanal character of anatomy is explored via some of its practitioners, with special attention being given to William Harvey and Albrecht von Haller. Attention is particularly drawn to the important role of experiment in anatomical research and practice-which has been misread by historians (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  26
    F. S. McNeilly (1968). The Anatomy of Leviathan. New York, St. Martin's P..
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45.  8
    Helen MacDonald (2008). Anatomy In The Antipodes. Metascience 17 (3):449-452.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  7
    Maria Paula Diogo, Ana Carneiro & Ana Simões (2001). The Portuguese Naturalist Correia da Serra (1751-1823) and His Impact on Early Nineteenth-Century Botany. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (2):353 - 393.
    This paper focuses on the contributions to natural history, particularly in methods of plant classification of the Portuguese botanist, man of letters, diplomat, and Freemason Abbé José Correia da Serra (1751-1823), placing them in their national and international political and social contexts. Correia da Serra adopted the natural method of classification championed by the Frenchman Antoine-Laurent de Jussieu, and introduced refinements of his own that owe much to parallel developments in zoology. He endorsed the view that the classification of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  7
    Elfed Huw Price (2012). Do Brains Think? Comparative Anatomy and the End of the Great Chain of Being in 19th-Century Britain. History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):32-50.
    The nature of the relationship between mind and body is one of the greatest remaining mysteries. As such, the historical origin of the current dominant belief that mind is a function of the brain takes on especial significance. In this article I aim to explore and explain how and why this belief emerged in early 19th-century Britain. Between 1815 and 1819 two brain-based physiologies of mind were the subject of controversy and debate in Britain: the system of phrenology devised by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  6
    Jonathan Simon (2003). Michael Sappol, A Traffic of Dead Bodies: Anatomy and Embodied Social Identity in Nineteenth-Century America. [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):117-120.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Gary Steiner (2010). The Cultural Significance of Rembrandt's “Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaas Tulp”. History of European Ideas 36 (3):273-279.
    The past several generations of scholarship on Rembrandt's “Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaas Tulp” have suffered from the anxiety of influence exercised by the influential interpretations of William Heckscher and William Schupbach. Schupbach's interpretation in particular has guided interpretation of the painting in the past generation and has given rise to a fundamental misunderstanding of the painting and its cultural significance. Schupbach and those whom he has influenced have failed to recognize that, from the standpoint of Baroque consciousness, there (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Martin S. Bergmann (1987). The Anatomy of Loving: The Story of Man's Quest to Know What Love Is. Columbia University Press.
1 — 50 / 1000