Search results for 'Anatomy history' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alan G. Soble (2003). The History of Sexual Anatomy and Self-Referential Philosophy of Science. Metaphilosophy 34 (3):229-249.score: 138.0
    This essay is a case study of the self-destruction that occurs in the work of a social-constructionist historian of science who embraces a radical philosophy of science. It focuses on Thomas Laqueur's Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud in arguing that a history of science committed to the social construction of science and to the central theses of Kuhnian, Duhemian, and Quinean philosophy of science is incoherent through self-reference. Laqueur's text is examined in detail in (...)
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  2. Charles T. Wolfe & Benjamin Goldberg (2012). Luuc Kooijmans . Death Defied: The Anatomy Lessons of Frederik Ruysch , Trans. Diane Webb. Leiden: Brill, 2011. History of Science and Medicine Library, Vol. 18. Pp. Xvi+472, Index. $169.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (1):177-182.score: 126.0
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  3. M. A. Crowther (1989). Reviews : W. F. Bynum, Roy Porter, and Michael Shepherd (Eds), The Anatomy of Madness: Essays in the History of Psychiatry, Volume III, The Asylum and its Psychiatry, London: Routledge, 1988, £35.00, Ix + 353 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 2 (3):392-394.score: 126.0
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  4. Pek Van Andel (1994). Anatomy of the Unsought Finding. Serendipity: Origin, History, Domains, Traditions, Appearances, Patterns and Programmability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):631-648.score: 120.0
    I define serendipity as the art of making an unsought finding. And I propose an overview of my collection of serendipities, the largest yet assembled, chiefly in science and technology, but also in art, by giving a list of ‘serendipity patterns’. Although my list of ‘patterns’ is just a list and not a classification, it serves to introduce a new and possibly stimulating perspective on the old subject of serendipity. Knowledge of these ‘serendipity patterns’ might help in expecting also the (...)
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  5. Pek Van Andel (1994). Anatomy of the Unsought Finding. Serendipity: Origin, History, Domains, Traditions, Appearances, Patterns and Programmability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):631 - 648.score: 120.0
    I define serendipity as the art of making an unsought finding. And I propose an overview of my collection of serendipities, the largest yet assembled, chiefly in science and technology, but also in art, by giving a list of 'serendipity patterns'. Although my list of 'patterns' is just a list and not a classification, it serves to introduce a new and possibly stimulating perspective on the old subject of serendipity. Knowledge of these 'serendipity patterns' might help in expecting also the (...)
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  6. Pek Andevanl (1994). Anatomy of the Unsought Finding. Serendipity: Orgin, History, Domains, Traditions, Appearances, Patterns and Programmability. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (2):631-648.score: 120.0
    I define serendipity as the art of making an unsought finding. And I propose an overview of my collection of serendipities, the largest yet assembled, chiefly in science and technology, but also in art, by giving a list of ‘serendipity patterns’. Although my list of ‘patterns’ is just a list and not a classification, it serves to introduce a new and possibly stimulating perspective on the old subject of serendipity. Knowledge of these ‘serendipity patterns’ might help in expecting also the (...)
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  7. S. T. Loseby (1998). Bernard S. Bachrach, The Anatomy of a Little War: A Diplomatic and Military History of the Gundovald Affair (568–586). (History and Warfare.) Boulder, Colo.; San Francisco; and Oxford: Westview Press, 1994. Pp. Xxiii, 283; Genealogical Tables, Maps, and Figures. $49.85. [REVIEW] Speculum 73 (2):462-463.score: 120.0
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  8. Míċeál F. Vaughan (2003). Anita Obermeier, The History and Anatomy of Auctorial Self-Criticism in the European Middle Ages. (Internationale Forschungen Zur Allgemeinen Und Vergleichenden Literaturwissenschaft, 32.) Amsterdam and Atlanta, Ga.: Rodopi, 1999. Paper. Pp. 314; Black-and-White Figures. $55.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 78 (1):236-239.score: 120.0
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  9. Dirk Stemerding (1993). How to Make Oneself Nature's Spokesman? A Latourian Account of Classification in Eighteenth- and Early Nineteenth-Century Natural History. Biology and Philosophy 8 (2):193-223.score: 84.0
    Classification in eighteenth-century natural history was marked by a battle of systems. The Linnaean approach to classification was severely criticized by those naturalists who aspired to a truly natural system. But how to make oneself nature''s spokesman? In this article I seek to answer that question using the approach of the French anthropologist of science Bruno Latour in a discussion of the work of the French naturalists Buffon and Cuvier in the eighteenth and early nineteenth century. These naturalists followed (...)
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  10. Jeff Loveland (2006). Another Daubenton, Another Histoire naturelle. Journal of the History of Biology 39 (3):457 - 491.score: 78.0
    Already in his lifetime, the naturalist Louis-Jean-Marie Daubenton was dramatically contrasted with his patron and collaborator on the Histoire naturelle (Natural History), Buffon figuring as stylish and prone to hypothesizing, Daubenton as narrow and unwilling to generalize. This caricatural image of Daubenton as an anti-Buffon persists even now. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the development of Daubenton's reputation and then to moderate it by showing that he was not so averse to theorizing or generalization as (...) has made him. Evidence for this argument comes from the Histoire naturelle and from unpublished manuscripts proving that he originally planned to contribute two synthetic treatises on animal anatomy to the Histoire naturelle. Reconstituting the series as he envisaged it allows a more balanced portrait of one of the founders of comparative anatomy and a look behind the scenes of one of the eighteenth century's most important scientific publications. (shrink)
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  11. H. LeGuyader (1999). [The concept of an organizational plan: some aspects of its history]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (3-4):339-379.score: 78.0
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  12. Evelleen Richards (1989). The "Moral Anatomy" of Robert Knox: The Interplay Between Biological and Social Thought in Victorian Scientific Naturalism. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 22 (3):373 - 436.score: 60.0
    Historians are now generally agreed that the Darwinian recognition and institutionalization of the polygenist position was more than merely nominal.194 Wallace, Vogt, and Huxley had led the way, and we may add Galton (1869) to the list of those leading Darwinians who incorporated a good deal of polygenist thinking into their interpretions of human history and racial differences.195 Eventually “Mr. Darwin himself,” as Hunt had suggested he might, consolidated the Darwinian endorsement of many features of polygenism. Darwin's Descent of (...)
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  13. Patricia Anne Baker, Han Nijdam & Karine van 'T. Land (eds.) (2011). Medicine and Space: Body, Surroundings, and Borders in Antiquity and the Middle Ages. Brill.score: 60.0
    The papers in this volume question how perceptions of space influenced understandings of the body and its functions, illness and treatment, and the surrounding natural and built environments in relation to health in the classical and ...
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  14. Christiane Sinding (1989). The History of Resistant Rickets: A Model for Understanding the Growth of Biomedical Knowledge. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 22 (3):461 - 495.score: 60.0
    Two essential periods may be identified in the early stages of the history of vitamin D-resistant rickets. The first was the period during which a very well known deficiency disease, rickets, acquired a scientific status: this required the development of unifying principles to confer upon the newly developing science of pathology a doctrine without which it would have been condemned to remain a collection of unrelated facts with very little practical application. One first such unifying principle was provided by (...)
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  15. James S. Terry (1985). The Humanities and Gross Anatomy: Forgotten Alternatives. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 6 (2):90-98.score: 54.0
    Researchers in medical education have extensively studied negative reactions to gross anatomy, sometimes grouped under the term “the cadaver experience.” Although there has been disagreement about the extent and importance of such phenomena, several attempts at curricular reform have been designed to “humanize” the student-cadaver encounter. However, some obvious sources linking gross anatomy and the humanities have been consistently overlooked. Such sources—from the history of art, the history of anatomy, and autobiographical and imaginative literature—not only (...)
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  16. Ian Glynn (forthcoming). An Anatomy of Thought: The Origin and Machinery of Mind. Indian Philosophical Quarterly.score: 54.0
    Amazon.com Love, fear, hope, calculus, and game shows-how do all these spring from a few delicate pounds of meat? Neurophysiologist Ian Glynn lays the foundation for answering this question in his expansive An Anatomy of Thought, but stops short of committing to one particular theory. The book is a pleasant challenge, presenting the reader with the latest research and thinking about neuroscience and how it relates to various models of consciousness. Combining the aim of a textbook with the style (...)
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  17. Olivier Lagueux (2003). Geoffroy's Giraffe: The Hagiography of a Charismatic Mammal. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 36 (2):225 - 247.score: 54.0
    In 1826, the Pasha of Egypt offered to the King Charles X an unusual present: a living giraffe. While offering remarkable animals was a common practice among monarchs, the choice of a giraffe was somewhat extraordinary since it was the first representative of its kind to set foot in France. The Royal Menagerie of the Paris Muséum national d'histoire naturelle was asked to oversee the transportation of this precious mammal and Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, one of its professors, was sent to (...)
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  18. Allister Neher (2011). Robert Knox and the Anatomy of Beauty. Medical Humanities 37 (1):46-50.score: 54.0
    Robert Knox (1791–1862) is typically remembered as the Edinburgh anatomist to whom the murderers Burke and Hare sold the bodies of their victims. This association brought Knox infamy and damaged his life and career. Before the Burke and Hare scandal, Knox was one of the most famous, original and influential anatomists in Britain. He was also something of a dandy with a sophisticated appreciation of the visual arts. His most significant writings on artistic subjects were his books A Manual of (...)
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  19. Jacalyn Duffin (1995). Infiltrating the Curriculum: An Integrative Approach to History for Medical Students. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 16 (3):155-174.score: 54.0
    I believe that the purpose of history in a medical school can be related to two simple goals: first, to make students a bit skeptical about everything else they are to be taught in the other lectures—skepticism fosters humility and life-long learning; second, to make them aware that medical history is a research discipline as compelling as any of the basic and clinical sciences they are traditionally taught. In the fall of 1988, I was given an opportunity to (...)
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  20. Mary G. Winkler (1989). Tragic Figures: Thoughts on the Visual Arts and Anatomy. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 10 (1):5-12.score: 54.0
    The illustrated anatomical works of Andreas Vesalius, now icons of medical history, exemplified Renaissance humanists' attitudes toward the human condition. Methods of teaching medical students gross anatomy have evolved from the attitudes and methods of Renaissance scientist-scholars. The work of Vesalius is crucial to understanding the revolution in early modern medicine, for not only is it devoted to minute observation and exploration of the human body, but also to translating new knowledge by means of art. In the process (...)
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  21. Christopher E. Cosans (1997). Galen's Critique of Rationalist and Empiricist Anatomy. Journal of the History of Biology 30 (1):35 - 54.score: 42.0
    This article explores Galen's analysis of and response to the Rationalist and Empiricist medical sects. It argues that his interest in their debate concerning the epistemology of medicine and anatomy was key to his advancement of an experimental methodology.
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  22. A. Cunningham (2002). The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - I: Old Physiology-the Pen. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (4):631-665.score: 42.0
    It is argued that the disciplinary identity of anatomy and physiology before 1800 are unknown to us due to the subsequent creation, success and historiographical dominance of a different discipline-experimental physiology. The first of these two papers deals with the identity of physiology from its revival in the 1530s, and demonstrates that it was a theoretical, not an experimental, discipline, achieved with the mind and the pen, not the hand and the knife. The physiological work of Jean Fernel, Albrecht (...)
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  23. Piotr Hoffman (1982). The Anatomy of Idealism: Passivity and Activity in Kant, Hegel, and Marx. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.score: 42.0
    In its attempt to come to grips with the nature of the human mind idealism employs such terms as "pure self," "transcendental apperception," "pure con sciousness" and so on.
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  24. F. S. McNeilly (1968). The Anatomy of Leviathan. New York, St. Martin's P..score: 42.0
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  25. Elfed Huw Price (2012). Do Brains Think? Comparative Anatomy and the End of the Great Chain of Being in 19th-Century Britain. History of the Human Sciences 25 (3):32-50.score: 42.0
    The nature of the relationship between mind and body is one of the greatest remaining mysteries. As such, the historical origin of the current dominant belief that mind is a function of the brain takes on especial significance. In this article I aim to explore and explain how and why this belief emerged in early 19th-century Britain. Between 1815 and 1819 two brain-based physiologies of mind were the subject of controversy and debate in Britain: the system of phrenology devised by (...)
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  26. Michael T. Ghiselin & Stephen Jay Gould (2002). An Autobiographical Anatomy. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):285 - 291.score: 42.0
    An 'anatomy' is a literary work that treats a particul.1r topic at great length and in minute detail. Viewed as a contribution to that genre, this massive and prolix tome may be read with patience and also with sympathy for its author. Gould diccl around the time that it was published, and the book is a fitting monument to his life's work. Because he goes into so much detail, providing an immense amount..
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  27. A. Cunningham (2003). The Pen and the Sword: Recovering the Disciplinary Identity of Physiology and Anatomy Before 1800 - II: Old Anatomy-the Sword. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):51-76.score: 42.0
    Following the exploration of the disciplinary identity of physiology before 1800 in the previous paper of this pair, the present paper seeks to recover the complementary identity of the discipline of anatomy before 1800. The manual, artisanal character of anatomy is explored via some of its practitioners, with special attention being given to William Harvey and Albrecht von Haller. Attention is particularly drawn to the important role of experiment in anatomical research and practice-which has been misread by historians (...)
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  28. Martin S. Bergmann (1987). The Anatomy of Loving: The Story of Man's Quest to Know What Love Is. Columbia University Press.score: 42.0
  29. Maria Paula Diogo, Ana Carneiro & Ana Simões (2001). The Portuguese Naturalist Correia da Serra (1751-1823) and His Impact on Early Nineteenth-Century Botany. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (2):353 - 393.score: 42.0
    This paper focuses on the contributions to natural history, particularly in methods of plant classification of the Portuguese botanist, man of letters, diplomat, and Freemason Abbé José Correia da Serra (1751-1823), placing them in their national and international political and social contexts. Correia da Serra adopted the natural method of classification championed by the Frenchman Antoine-Laurent de Jussieu, and introduced refinements of his own that owe much to parallel developments in zoology. He endorsed the view that the classification of (...)
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  30. Kimberly Brewer & Andrew Chignell (2014). Kant's Anatomy of Evil. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):393-397.score: 36.0
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  31. Tom Rockmore (1985). Review: Hoffman, The Anatomy of Idealism: Passivity and Activity in Kant, Hegel and Marx. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (1):118-119.score: 36.0
  32. Daniel T. Rodgers (2007). Anatomy of a Cliché. Journal of the History of Ideas 68 (3):389-393.score: 36.0
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  33. Michael Boylan & Charles Johnson (2010). Ahbel-Rappe, Sara. Socrates: A Guide for the Perplexed. London-New York: Continuum, 2009. Pp. Viii+ 187. Paper, $19.95. Alves, Andre A., and Jose M. Moreira. The Salamanca School. Major Conservative and Libertarian Think-Ers 9. London-New York: Continuum, 2010. Pp. Xii+ 153. Cloth, $130.00. Anderson-Gold, Sharon, and Pablo Muchnik. Kant's Anatomy of Evil. Cambridge-London: Cambridge. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):409-412.score: 36.0
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  34. P. J. Johnson (1970). The Anatomy of Leviathan. Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (4).score: 36.0
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  35. John Bird (2008). Book Review: Elisabeth Young-Bruehl: Recent Works Elisabeth Young-Bruehl, Where Do We Fall When We Fall in Love. New York: Other Press, 2003. ISBN 1-59051-068-2. £32.94/$50, 339 Pp. Cherishment: A Psychology of the Heart. New York: Free Press, 2000. ISBN 0-684-85966-1. £9.95/$18.95, 253 Pp. The Anatomy of Prejudices. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998. ISBN 0-674-03191-1. £12.95/$18.95, 640 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 21 (2):133-139.score: 36.0
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  36. George J. Stack (1971). The Anatomy of Disillusion: Martin Heidegger's Notion of Truth. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (2):268-270.score: 36.0
  37. Oliver Feltham (2013). Anatomy of Failure: Philosophy and Political Action. Bloomsbury Academic.score: 36.0
    Thrasymachus versus Socrates on philosophy and political action -- 1647: the history of the leveller-agitators and the new model army -- Hobbes' and Locke's metaphysics: substances no longer act, institutions act -- Hobbes and Locke on religious conflict: when institutions act, subjects act -- Hobbes and Locke on politics: sovereign action and contractual action -- Unveiling the forgotten model: the leveller-agitators on joint action.
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  38. Hans Köchler (1984). Anatomy of Linguistic Usage. On the Rules, Intentions and Conventions of Human Communication. Philosophy and History 17 (1):48-49.score: 36.0
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  39. G. E. R. Lloyd (2004). Ancient Worlds, Modern Reflections: Philosophical Perspectives on Greek and Chinese Science and Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    Geoffrey Lloyd engages in a wide-ranging exploration of what we can learn from the study of ancient civilizations that is relevant to fundamental problems, both intellectual and moral, that we still face today. These include, in philosophy of science, the question of the incommensurability of paradigms, the debate between realism and relativism or constructivism, and between correspondence and coherence conceptions of truth. How far is it possible to arrive at an understanding of alien systems of belief? Is it possible to (...)
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  40. Michael Witmore (2001). Culture of Accidents: Unexpected Knowledges in Early Modern England. Stanford University Press.score: 36.0
    Collapsing buildings, unexpected meetings in the marketplace, monstrous births, encounters with pirates at sea - these and other unforeseen 'accidents' at the turn of the seventeenth century in England acquired unprecedented significance in the early modern philosophical and cultural imagination. Drawing on intellectual history, cultural criticism, and rhetorical theory, this book chronicles the narrative transformation of 'accident' from a philosophical dead end to an astonishing occasion for revelation and wonder in early modern religious life, dramatic practice, and experimental philosophy. (...)
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  41. I. D. Raacke (1976). "The Die Is Cast" -- "I Am Going Home": The Appointment of Herbert McLean Evans as Head of Anatomy at Berkeley. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 9 (2):301 - 322.score: 36.0
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  42. Laura Kelly (2011). Anatomy Dissections and Student Experience at Irish Universities, C.1900s–1960s. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (4):467-474.score: 36.0
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  43. Raluca Moldovan (2010). Anatomy of a Hoax: Holocaust Denial. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (11):17-27.score: 36.0
    The phenomenon of Holocaust denial, once considered a fringe manifestation with very little impact, has, more or less, entered the mainstream of historiographical and academic debate in recent years. The main danger associated with the deniers’ discourse is that of forcing into the public conscience the awareness of the fact that there might be “more sides” to the Holocaust history than previously known based on written documents, testimonies of survivors and other types of proofs. The following paper is a (...)
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  44. Gary Steiner (2010). The Cultural Significance of Rembrandt's “Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaas Tulp”. History of European Ideas 36 (3):273-279.score: 36.0
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  45. Toby A. Appel (1988). Jeffries Wyman, Philosophical Anatomy, and the Scientific Reception of Darwin in America. Journal of the History of Biology 21 (1):69 - 94.score: 36.0
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  46. Archie Archie (2011). The Philosophical and Political Anatomy of Plato's Alcibiades Major. History of Political Thought 32 (2):234-252.score: 36.0
    Given the ominous shadow cast by Alcibiades over Socrates' trial, the scholarly assessment of Alcibiades Major deserves to be revisited. The aim of this article is to critically review the various treatments of Alcibiades Major among ancient, modern and contemporary scholars. It also seeks to highlight modern and contemporary themes the dialogue anticipates, such as feminism and, to a lesser extent, multiculturalism. The review will also show that it was in the nineteenth century that objections were first raised about the (...)
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  47. Anthony Kenny (1973). The Anatomy of the Soul. [Oxford]Basil Blackwell.score: 36.0
    Mental health in Plato's Republic.--The practical syllogism and incontinence.--Aristotle on happiness.--Intellect and imagination in Aquinas.--Descartes on the will.--Cartesian privacy.--Appendix: The history of intention in ethics.--Bibliography (p. [147]).
     
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  48. Joan B. Landes (2007). The Anatomy of Artificial Life: An Eighteenth-Century Perspective. In Jessica Riskin (ed.), Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life. University of Chicago Press. 96--116.score: 36.0
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  49. Michael Ghiselin (2002). Essay Review: An Autobiographical Anatomy. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):285-291.score: 36.0
  50. Margaret Moore (1995). The Anatomy of Antiliberalism. History of European Ideas 21 (3):467-468.score: 36.0
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