Search results for 'Ancients and moderns, Quarrel of' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dan Edelstein (2010). The Enlightenment: A Genealogy. University of Chicago Press.score: 148.5
    Interpreting the Enlightenment: on methods -- A map of the Enlightenment: whither France? -- The spirit of the moderns: from the new science to the Enlightenment -- Society, the subject of the modern story -- Quarrel in the Academy: the ancients strike back -- Humanism and Enlightenment: the classical style of the philosophes -- The philosophical spirit of the laws: politics and antiquity -- An ancient god: pagans and philosophers -- Post tenebras lux: Begriffsgeschichte or regime d'historicité? -- (...)
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  2. Samuel Mateus (2012). A Querela Dos Antigos E Dos ModernosThe Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns – Mapping Some Topoi. Cultura 29:179-200.score: 148.5
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  3. George Bragues (2008). The Ancients Against the Moderns: Focusing on the Character of Corporate Leaders. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):373 - 387.score: 103.0
    When a series of corporate scandals erupted soon after the collapse of the 1990s bull market in equities, policy makers and reformers chiefly responded by augmenting and refining the checks and balances surrounding publicly traded corporations. Through measures such as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, securities regulations were intensified and corporate governance was tightened. In essence, reformers followed the tradition of modern political philosophy, developed in the 17th and 18th centuries, in its insistence that pro-social outcomes are best produced through (...)
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  4. Elnora Gondim (2010). John Rawls: The Liberty of Ancients and the Liberty of Moderns-Presuppositions of Coherentist Justification. Discusiones Filosóficas 11 (17):151-165.score: 85.5
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  5. Quentin Skinner (2012). On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply to My Critics. Journal of the History of Ideas 73 (1):127-146.score: 84.0
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  6. Michael Chase, Stephen R. L. Clark & Michael McGhee (eds.) (2013). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Ancients and Moderns - Essays in Honor of Pierre Hadot. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 84.0
    This unique collection of essays on the late Pierre Hadot’s revolutionary approach to studying and practising philosophy traces the links between his work and that of thinkers from Wittgenstein to the French postmodernists.
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  7. Aaron W. Hughes (2010). Preface Ancients and Moderns in Jewish Philosophy: The Case of Hermann Cohen. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 18 (1):i-ix.score: 84.0
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  8. Lisa A. Hughes (2012). The Art of the Body: Antiquity and Its Legacy (Ancients and Moderns)(Review). American Journal of Philology 133 (2):334-337.score: 84.0
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  9. Joseph M. Levine (forthcoming). Giambattista Vico and the Quarrel Between the Ancients and the Moderns. Journal of the History of Ideas.score: 84.0
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  10. David M. Rasmussen (1993). Rights--The New Quarrel Between the Ancients and the Moderns. Review of Metaphysics 47 (2):368-369.score: 84.0
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  11. Cropsey, Joseph & [From Old Catalog] (1964). Ancients and Moderns; Essays on the Tradition of Political Philosophy in Honor of Leo Strauss. New York, Basic Books.score: 81.0
  12. Andreas Kalyvas (2008). The Democratic Agonism of the Ancients Compared to That of the (Post)Moderns. In Andrew Schaap (ed.), Law and Agonistic Politics. Ashgate Pub. Company.score: 81.0
     
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  13. M. L. Monheit (2001). The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome. By Ingrid D. Rowland. The European Legacy 6 (6):847-847.score: 81.0
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  14. Patrick Riley (2001). Rousseau, Fénelon, and the Quarrel Between the Ancients and the Moderns. In , The Cambridge Companion to Rousseau. Cambridge University Press. 78--93.score: 81.0
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  15. H. J. Rose (1933). The Ancients in the Moderns Mythology and the Renaissance Tradition in English Poetry. By Douglas Bush. Pp. Viii+360. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press (London: Milford), 1932. Cloth, $4 or 24s. Classical Mythology in the Poetry of Edmund Spenser. By Henry Gibbons Lotspeich. Pp. X + 126. Princeton: University Press, 1932. Paper, 12s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (04):147-148.score: 81.0
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  16. Carl A. Rubino (forthcoming). The Invisible Worm: Ancients and Moderns in" The Name of the Rose". Substance.score: 81.0
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  17. Pierre Force (2009). Voltaire and the Necessity of Modern History. Modern Intellectual History 6 (3):457-484.score: 68.5
    This article revisits what has often been called the of Voltaire's historical work. It looks at the methodological and philosophical reasons for Voltaire's deliberate focus on modern history as opposed to ancient history, his refusal to in judging the past, and his extreme selectiveness in determining the relevance of past events to world history. Voltaire's historical practice is put in the context of the quarrel of the ancients and the moderns, and considered in a tradition of universal history (...)
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  18. David Rapport Lachterman (1989). The Ethics of Geometry: A Genealogy of Modernity. Routledge.score: 67.5
    The Ethics of Geometry is a study of the relationship between philosophy and mathematics. Essential differences in the ethos of mathematics, for example, the customary ways of undertaking and understanding mathematical procedures and their objects, provide insight into the fundamental issues in the quarrel of moderns with ancients. Two signal features of the modern ethos are the priority of problem-solving over theorem-proving, and the claim that constructability by human minds or instruments establishes the existence of relevant entities. These (...)
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  19. Bernard G. Prusak (2005). The Ancients, the Moderns, and the Court. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:189-200.score: 66.0
    This paper examines the case of Lawrence v. Texas to bring out the philosophical commitments of Justices Anthony Kennedy and Antonin Scalia. It is proposed that Justices Kennedy and Scalia, while both Catholics, represent fundamentally different visions of the “ends and reasons” of democratic law. A close reading of the Justices’ opinions in Lawrence indicates that Justice Scalia belongs to the tradition of the “ancients” and Justice Kennedy to the tradition of the “moderns.” The paper focuses in particular on (...)
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  20. Michael L. Frazer (2006). Esotericism Ancient and Modern: Strauss Contra Straussianism on the Art of Political-Philosophical Writing. Political Theory 34 (1):33 - 61.score: 60.0
    Leo Strauss presents at least two distinct accounts of the idea that the authors in the political-philosophical canon have often masked their true teachings. A weaker account of esotericism, dependent on the contingent fact of presecution, is attributed to the moderns, while a stronger account, stemming from a necessary conflict between philosophy and society, is attributed to the ancients. Although most interpreters agree that Strauss here sides with the ancients, this view fails to consider the possibility that Strauss's (...)
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  21. Kalliopi Nikolopoulou (2009). Plato and Hegel on an Old Quarrel. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):249-266.score: 60.0
    This paper addresses the relationship of ancients to moderns by focusing on the “quarrel” between art and philosophy that has led to two articulations of the endof art—one in antiquity, another in modernity: Plato, who expelled the poets from his city on account of art’s irrationality, and Hegel, for whom art was no more the necessary vehicle for truth. Following Giorgio Agamben’s cue in The Man Without Content, I opt for a symptomatic reading of Plato’s condemnation of art, (...)
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  22. Dimitri El Murr (2004). (S.) Halliwell The Aesthetics of Mimesis. Ancients Texts and Modern Problems. Princeton UP, 2002. Pp. Xiii + 424. £45 (Hbk); £18 (Pbk). 0472109081 (Hbk); 0691092583 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:219-220.score: 54.0
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  23. Dimitri El Murr & S. Halliwell (2004). The Aesthetics of Mimesis. Ancients Texts and Modern Problems. Journal of Hellenic Studies 124:219.score: 54.0
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  24. Stanley Rosen (1987). Hermeneutics as Politics. Oxford University Press.score: 48.5
    Combining exemplary scholarship and analytic precision, Stanley Rosen illuminates the underpinnings of post-modernist thought, providing valuable insight as he pursues two arguments: first, that post-modernism, which regards itself as an attack upon the Enlightenment, is in fact the penultimate stage of the Enlightenment itself; and second, that the extraordinary contemporary emphasis upon hermeneutics is the latest consequence of the triumph of history over mathematics within the unstable essence of the Enlightenment. Hermeneutics is consequently at bottom a political phenomenon. In developing (...)
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  25. Stephen Puryear (2009). Review of Janice Thomas, The Minds of the Moderns: Rationalism, Empiricism and Philosophy of Mind. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.score: 48.0
    In this work Thomas surveys the contributions of (pre-Kantian) early modern philosophy to our understanding of the mind. She focuses on the six canonical figures of the period -- Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, and Hume -- and asks what each has to say about five topics within the philosophy of mind. The topics are (1) the ontological status of mind, (2) the scope and nature of self-knowledge, (3) the nature of consciousness, (4) the problem of mental causation, and (5) (...)
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  26. Gerald F. Gaus (2007). On Justifying the Moral Rights of the Moderns: A Case of Old Wine in New Bottles. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):84-119.score: 48.0
    In this essay I sketch a philosophical argument for classical liberalism based on the requirements of public reason. I argue that we can develop a philosophical liberalism that, unlike so much recent philosophy, takes existing social facts and mores seriously while, at the same time, retaining the critical edge characteristic of the liberal tradition. I argue that once we develop such an account, we are led toward a vindication of “old” (qua classical) liberal morality—what Benjamin Constant called the “liberties of (...)
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  27. Trevor Hogan (2003). `First of the Moderns': Reading Carlyle Reading Goethe, Again. Thesis Eleven 72 (1):46-64.score: 48.0
    This article reads Carlyle as a reader of Goethe to recover why he proclaimed Goethe as the `benignant spiritual revolutionist' of modernity and `first of the moderns'. As Goethe's first major English translator, Thomas Carlyle was also arguably the first to grasp the nature and purpose of Goethe's project to interpret modernity as a revolutionary epoch involving changes in consciousness, culture and material development. For Carlyle, Goethe's Faust presents modern consciousness and culture from the side of elegy - as the (...)
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  28. Piotr Nowak (2014). The Ancients and Shakespeare on Time: Some Remarks on the War of Generations. Editions Rodopi.score: 48.0
    In The Ancients and Shakespeare on Time Piotr Nowak depicts a world where tradition – devoid of gravity, “Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything” – attempts to curb the young and new, while youth resists with all its power, vitality and characteristic insolence. The wars of generations, which Nowak explores in the works of Plato, Aristophanes and Shakespeare, pertain to the essence and meaning of time. They make up the dramatic tensions in the transgenerational dialogue between the (...)
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  29. Leo Strauss (2002). Leo Strauss: The Early Writings (1921-1932). State University of New York Press.score: 48.0
    Presents the early published writings of the distinguished political philosopher Leo Strauss, available here for the first time in English. “Zank places at the reader’s disposal the young Strauss’s passionate advocacy of political Zionism and his early confrontations with Spinoza, consideration of whom helped lead Strauss to formulate his teaching on ‘the quarrel between the ancients and the moderns.’” — National Review.
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  30. Nick Gier, The Color of Sin / the Color of Skin: Ancient Color Blindness and the Philosophical Origins of Modern Racism.score: 45.0
    We tend to think that the two great scourges of humankind, sexism and racism, have been around since the beginning of time. With regard to sexism, this is true. Aristotle, for example, thought women are malformed men: they do not have rational souls; they do not have enough soul heat to think properly or to boil their menstrual blood into semen; and, the cruelest cut of all, they are inferior because they have one less tooth than men. Aristotle also believed, (...)
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  31. John Christian Laursen (1992). The Politics of Skepticism in the Ancients, Montaigne, Hume, and Kant. E.J. Brill.score: 45.0
    This book brings out the profound influence of the tradition of philosophical skepticism on political thought.
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  32. J. Bos (2009). The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory. History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.score: 45.0
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together is (...)
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  33. Mikko Tolonen (forthcoming). The Gothic Origin of Modern Civility: Mandeville and the Scots on Courage. .score: 45.0
    This paper seeks to establish that Bernard Mandeville's ideas on courage and honour shaped the Scottish debate about ancients and moderns by formulating a perspective how eighteenth-century civil societies grew large, luxurious and feminine without losing their ability to wage war. My focus is on Mandeville's positive influence on David Hume, whose writings were a springboard for many Mandevillean ideas in Scotland. In contrast to a recent claim in scholarship, Hume aimed to discredit, instead of developing, Shaftesburyan ideas of (...)
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  34. Richard Hillyer (2004). Hobbes's Explicated Fables and the Legacy of the Ancients. Philosophy and Literature 28 (2):269-283.score: 42.0
    : A transitional text in other respects as well, De Cive differs from Hobbes's earlier Elements of Law and later Leviathan by claiming points of agreement between his own political philosophy and that embodied allegorically in the fables of classical antiquity (as explicated by himself). Though he did not begin with and subsequently abandoned this unconvincing approach, it reveals how late in his intellectual development he was still tempted to find some way of establishing classical precedents for his views, and (...)
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  35. Eva-Maria Engelen (2009). Anger, Shame and Justice: The Regulative Function of Emotions in the Ancient and Modern World. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes. Springer.score: 38.5
    Analyzing the ancient Greek point of view concerning anger, shame and justice and a very modern one, one can see, that anger has a regulative function, but shame does as well. Anger puts the other in his place, thereby regulating hierarchies. Shame regulates the social relations of recognition. And both emotions also have an evaluative function, because anger evaluates a situation with regard to a humiliation; shame, with regard to a misdemeanor. In addition, attention has to be paid to the (...)
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  36. Mark Coeckelbergh (2004). The Metaphysics of Autonomy: The Reconciliation of Ancient and Modern Ideals of the Person. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 38.0
    If we want to be autonomous, what do we want? The author shows that contemporary value-neutral and metaphysically economical conceptions of autonomy, such as that of Harry Frankfurt, face a serious problem. Drawing on Plato, Augustine, and Kant, this book provides a sketch of how "ancient" and "modern" can be reconciled to solve it. But at what expense? It turns out that the dominant modern ideal of autonomy cannot do without a costly metaphysics if it is to be coherent.
     
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  37. Manfred Kienpointner (1997). On the Art of Finding Arguments: What Ancient and Modern Masters of Invention Have to Tell Us About the" Ars Inveniendi". Argumentation 11 (2):225-236.score: 37.5
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  38. Gianna Pomata (2011). A Word of the Empirics: The Ancient Concept of Observation and its Recovery in Early Modern Medicine. Annals of Science 68 (1):1-25.score: 37.0
    Summary The genealogy of observation as a philosophical term goes back to the ancient Greek astronomical and medical traditions, and the revival of the concept in the Renaissance also happened in the astronomical and medical context. This essay focuses primarily on the medical genealogy of the concept of observation. In ancient Greek culture, an elaboration of the concept of observation (t?r?sis) first emerged in the Hellenistic age with the medical sect of the Empirics, to be further developed by the ancient (...)
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  39. Sam Crane (2013). Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Dao: Ancient Chinese Thought in Modern American Life. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 36.5
    This highly original work introduces the ideas and arguments of the ancient Chinese philosophies of Confucianism and Daoism to some of the most intractable social issues of modern American life, including abortion, gay marriage, and ...
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  40. Allegra De Laurentiis (2005). Subjects in the Ancient and Modern World: On Hegel's Theory of Subjectivity. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 36.5
    Being a subject and being conscious of being one are different realities. According to Hegel, the difference is not only conceptual, but also influences people's experience of the world and of one another. This book aims to explain some basic aspects of Hegel's conception of subjectivity with particular regard to the difference he saw in ancient and modern ways of thinking about and acting as individuals, persons and moral subjects.
     
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  41. Anne Finch Conway (1996). The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    Anne Conway was an extraordinary figure in a remarkable age. Her mastery of the intricate doctrines of the Lurianic Kabbalah, her authorship of a treatise criticising the philosophy of Descartes, Hobbes, and Spinoza, and her scandalous conversion to the despised sect of Quakers indicate a strength of character and independence of mind wholly unexpected (and unwanted) in a woman at the time. Translated for the first time into modern English, her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy is the (...)
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  42. Robert A. Mechikoff (2006). A History and Philosophy of Sport and Physical Education: From Ancient Civilizations to the Modern World. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 36.0
    This engaging and informative text will hold the attention of students and scholars as they take a journey through time to understand the role that history and philosophy have played in shaping the course of sport and physical education in Western and selected non-Western civilizations. Using appropriate theoretical and interpretive frameworks, students will investigate topics such as the historical relationship between mind and body; what philosophers and intellectuals have said about the body as a source of knowledge; educational philosophy and (...)
     
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  43. Constantine Cavarnos (2003). Orthodoxy and Philosophy: Lectures Delivered at St. Tikhon's Orthodox Theological Seminary: An Illuminating Discussion of Orthodox Christianity with Reference to Ancient Greek and Modern Western Philosophy. Institute for Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies.score: 35.0
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  44. Andrey Darovskikh (2012). Book Review: Morwenna Ludlow. Gregory of Nyssa: Ancient and (Post) Modern. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. [REVIEW] Forum Philosophicum 17 (2):278-281.score: 35.0
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  45. Constantine Sandis (2009). Gods and Mental States : The Causation of Action in Ancient Tragedy and Modern Philosophy of Mind. In , New Essays on the Explanation of Action. Palgrave Macmillan. 358--385.score: 33.5
    This paper argues that contemporary philosophy of mind and action could learn much from the structure of action explanation manifested in ancient Greek tragedy, which is less deterministic than typically supposed and which does not conflate the motivation of action with its causal production.
     
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  46. Jiyuan Yu (2010). The Practicality of Ancient Virtue Ethics: Greece and China. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (3):289-302.score: 33.0
    Virtue ethics has been charged with being unable to provide solutions to practical moral issues. In response, the defenders of virtue ethics argue that normative virtue ethics exists. The debate is significant on its own, yet both sides of the controversy approach the issue from the assumption that moral philosophy has to tell us what we should do. In this essay, I would like to examine the question regarding the practicality of virtue ethics in a different way. Virtue ethics is (...)
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  47. Marco Sgarbi (ed.) (2012). Translatio Studiorum: Ancient, Medieval and Modern Bearers of Intellectual History. Brill.score: 32.5
    This volume collects 17 case studies that characterize the various kinds of translations of the European culture of the last two and a half millennia from ancient Greece to Rome, from the medieval world to the Renaissance up to the ...
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  48. Andrew Bailey, Samantha Brennan, Will Kymlicka, Jacob Levy, Alex Sager & Clark Wolf (eds.) (2012). The Broadview Anthology of Social and Political Thought: Essential Readings: Ancient, Modern, and Contemporary Texts. Broadview Press.score: 32.5
    This volume features a careful selection of major works in political and social philosophy from ancient times through to the present. Every reading has been painstakingly annotated, and each figure is given a substantial introduction highlighting his or her major contribution to the tradition. The anthology offers both depth and breadth in its selection of material by central figures, while also representing other currents of political thought. Thirty-two authors are represented, including fourteen from the 20th century. The editors have made (...)
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  49. Anson Laytner, Daniel Ethan Bridge & Matthew Kaufmann (eds.) (2005). The Animals' Lawsuit Against Humanity: A Modern Adaptation of an Ancient Animal Rights Tale. Fons Vitae.score: 32.5
    In this interfaith and multicultural fable, eloquent representatives of all members of the animal kingdom—from horses to bees—come before the respected Spirit King to complain of the dreadful treatment they have suffered at the hands of humankind. During the ensuing trial, where both humans and animals testify before the King, both sides argue their points ingeniously, deftly illustrating the validity of both sides of the ecology debate. The ancient antecedents of this tale are thought to have originated in India, with (...)
     
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  50. Michael Allen Gillespie (2008). The Theological Origins of Modernity. University of Chicago Press.score: 32.0
    Exhuming the long-buried religious roots of our ostensibly godless age, Michael Allen Gillespie reveals in this landmark study that modernity is much less secular than conventional wisdom suggests. Taking as his starting point the collapse of the medieval world, Gillespie argues that from the very beginning moderns sought not to eliminate religion but to support a new view of religion and its place in human life—and that they did so not out of hostility but in order to sustain certain religious (...)
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