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  1. Cheryl Cline, Andrea Frolic & Robert Sibbald (2013). Beyond Trail Blazing: A Roadmap for New Healthcare Ethics Leaders (and the People Who Hire Them). [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (3):211-227.
    This article is intended to serve as a roadmap to help new healthcare ethics leaders establish or renew an ethics program in a healthcare organization. The authors share a systemic step-by-step process for navigating this early career passage. In this paper, we describe five critical success strategies and provide explanations and concrete tools to help get you on the road to success as quickly and painlessly as possible. We will discuss how to define your role; diagnose your organization’s needs; build (...)
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  2. Andrea Frolic, Sandra Andreychuk, Wendy Seidlitz, Angela Djuric-Paulin, Barb Flaherty, Barb Jennings & Donna Peace (2013). Implementing a Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment Survey: Results of a Pilot Study (Part 2 of 2). [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (1):61-78.
    This paper details the implementation of the Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment Survey (CENAS) through a pilot study in five units within Hamilton Health Sciences. We describe how these pilot sites were selected, how we implemented the survey, the significant results and our interpretation of the findings. The primary goal of this paper is to share our experiences using this tool, specifically the challenges we encountered conducting a staff ethics needs assessment across different units in a large teaching hospital, and the (...)
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  3. Andrea Frolic, Barb Jennings, Wendy Seidlitz, Sandy Andreychuk, Angela Djuric-Paulin, Barb Flaherty & Donna Peace (2013). From Reactive to Proactive: Developing a Valid Clinical Ethics Needs Assessment Survey to Support Ethics Program Strategic Planning (Part 1 of 2). [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (1):47-60.
    As ethics committees and programs become integrated into the “usual business” of healthcare organizations, they are likely to face the predicament of responding to greater demands for service and higher expectations, without an influx of additional resources. This situation demands that ethics committees and programs allocate their scarce resources (including their time, skills and funds) strategically, rather than lurching from one ad hoc request to another; finding ways to maximize the effectiveness, efficiency, impact and quality of ethics services is essential (...)
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  4. Cheryl Cline, Ann Heesters, Barbara Secker & Andrea Frolic (2012). Education for Ethics Practice: Tailoring Curricula to Local Needs and Objectives. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (3):227-243.
    Currently, there is no authoritative credentialing process for individuals engaged in ethics practice, no accreditation system that sets minimum education standards for programs aiming to prepare these individuals for their work, and little evidence available that any particular training model is actually achieving its pedagogical goals. At the same time, a number of healthcare organizations and universities now routinely offer post-graduate programs, clinical fellowships and in-house training specifically devised to prepare graduates for ethics practice. However, while their numbers appear to (...)
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  5. Andrea Frolic (2012). Grassroots Origins, National Engagement: Exploring the Professionalization of Practicing Healthcare Ethicists in Canada. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (3):153-164.
    Canadian ethicists have a long legacy of leadership in advocating for standards and quality in healthcare ethics. Continuing this tradition, a grassroots organization of practicing healthcare ethicists (PHEs) concerned about the lack of standardization in the field recently formed to explore potential options related to professionalization. This group calls itself “practicing healthcare ethicists exploring professionalization” (PHEEP). This paper provides a description of the process by which PHEEP has begun to engage the Canadian PHE community in the development of practice standards (...)
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  6. Andrea Frolic, Katherine Drolet, Kim Bryanton, Carole Caron, Cynthia Cupido, Barb Flaherty, Sylvia Fung & Lori McCall (2012). Opening the Black Box of Ethics Policy Work: Evaluating a Covert Practice. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):3-15.
    Hospital ethics committees (HECs) and ethicists generally describe themselves as engaged in four domains of practice: case consultation, research, education, and policy work. Despite the increasing attention to quality indicators, practice standards, and evaluation methods for the other domains, comparatively little is known or published about the policy work of HECs or ethicists. This article attempts to open the ?black box? of this health care ethics practice by providing two detailed case examples of ethics policy reviews. We also describe the (...)
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  7. Andrea Frolic (2011). Who Are We When We Are Doing What We Are Doing? The Case for Mindful Embodiment in Ethics Case Consultation. Bioethics 25 (7):370-382.
    This paper explores the theory and practice of embodied epistemology or mindful embodiment in ethics case consultation. I argue that not only is this epistemology an ethical imperative to safeguard the integrity of this emerging profession, but that it has the potential to improve the quality of ethics consultation (EC). It also has implications for how ethics consultants are trained and how consultation services are organized. My viewpoint is informed by ethnographic research and by my experimental application of mindful embodiment (...)
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  8. Andrea Frolic, Michael D. Coughlin & Bernard Keating (2011). Nationalism and Canadian Bioethics. In Catherine Myser (ed.), Bioethics Around the Globe. Oxford University Press. 191.
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  9. Andrea Frolic, Michael D. Coughlin & Bernard Keating (2011). The Dominion of Bioethics : Nationalism and Canadian Bioethics. In Catherine Myser (ed.), Bioethics Around the Globe. Oxford University Press.
  10. Paula Chidwick, Jennifer Bell, Eoin Connolly, Michael D. Coughlin, Andrea Frolic, Laurie Hardingham & Randi Zlotnik Shaul (2010). Exploring a Model Role Description for Ethicists. HEC Forum 22 (1):31-40.
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  11. Paula Chidwick, Jennifer Bell, Eoin Connolly, Michael Coughlin, Andrea Frolic, Laurie Hardingham & Randi Zlotnik Shaul (2010). Exploring a Model Role Description for Ethicists. HEC Forum 22 (1):31-40.
    This paper provides a description of the role of the clinical ethicist as it is generally experienced in Canada. It examines the activities of Canadian ethicists working in healthcare institutions and the way in which their work incorporates more than ethics case consultation. The Canadian Bioethics Society established a Taskforce on Working Conditions for Bioethics (hereafter referred to as the Taskforce), to make recommendations on a number of issues affecting ethicists and to develop a model role description. This essay carefully (...)
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  12. Andrea Frolic & Paula Chidwick (2010). A Pilot Qualitative Study of “Conflicts of Interests and/or Conflicting Interests” Among Canadian Bioethicists. Part 1: Five Cases, Experiences and Lessons Learned. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):5-17.
    In this pilot qualitative study 13 clinical bioethicists from across Canada were interviewed about their experiences of conflicts of interest and/or conflicting interests in their professional roles. The interviews generated five composite cases. Participants reported being significantly impacted by these experiences both personally and professionally.
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  13. Andrea Frolic & Paula Chidwick (2010). A Pilot Qualitative Study of “Conflicts of Interests and/or Conflicting Interests” Among Canadian Bioethicists. Part 2: Defining and Managing Conflicts. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):19-29.
    This paper examines one aspect of professional practice for bioethicists: managing conflicts of interest. Drawing from our qualitative study and descriptive analysis of the experiences of conflicts of interest and/or conflicting interests (COI) of 13 Canadian clinical bioethicists (Frolic and Chidwick 2010), this paper examines how bioethicists define their roles, the nature of COIs in their roles, how their COIs relate to conventional definitions of conflicts of interest, and how COIs can be most effectively managed.
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