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  1. Andreas Glöckner & Thorsten Pachur (2012). Cognitive Models of Risky Choice: Parameter Stability and Predictive Accuracy of Prospect Theory. Cognition 123 (1):21-32.
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  2. Marc Jekel, Andreas Glöckner, Susann Fiedler & Arndt Bröder (2012). The Rationality of Different Kinds of Intuitive Decision Processes. Synthese 189 (S1):147-160.
    Whereas classic work in judgment and decision making has focused on the deviation of intuition from rationality, more recent research has focused on the performance of intuition in real-world environments. Borrowing from both approaches, we investigate to which extent competing models of intuitive probabilistic decision making overlap with choices according to the axioms of probability theory and how accurate those models can be expected to perform in real-world environments. Specifically, we assessed to which extent heuristics, models implementing weighted additive information (...)
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  3. Cilia Witteman & Andreas Glöckner (2011). Beyond Dual-Process Models: A Categorisation of Processes Underlying Intuitive Judgement and Decision Making. Thinking and Reasoning 16 (1):1-25.
    Intuitive-automatic processes are crucial for making judgements and decisions. The fascinating complexity of these processes has attracted many decision researchers, prompting them to start investigating intuition empirically and to develop numerous models. Dual-process models assume a clear distinction between intuitive and deliberate processes but provide no further differentiation within both categories. We go beyond these models and argue that intuition is not a homogeneous concept, but a label used for different cognitive mechanisms. We suggest that these mechanisms have to be (...)
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  4. Andreas Glöckner & Cilia Witteman (2010). Beyond Dual-Process Models: A Categorisation of Processes Underlying Intuitive Judgement and Decision Making. Thinking and Reasoning 16 (1):1 – 25.
    Intuitive-automatic processes are crucial for making judgements and decisions. The fascinating complexity of these processes has attracted many decision researchers, prompting them to start investigating intuition empirically and to develop numerous models. Dual-process models assume a clear distinction between intuitive and deliberate processes but provide no further differentiation within both categories. We go beyond these models and argue that intuition is not a homogeneous concept, but a label used for different cognitive mechanisms. We suggest that these mechanisms have to be (...)
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