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  1. Ralph Hertwig & Andreas Ortmann (2008). Deception in Experiments: Revisiting the Arguments in its Defense. Ethics and Behavior 18 (1):59 – 92.
    In psychology, deception is commonly used to increase experimental control. Yet, its use has provoked concerns that it raises participants' suspicions, prompts second-guessing of experimenters' true intentions, and ultimately distorts behavior and endangers the control it is meant to achieve. Over time, these concerns regarding the methodological costs of the use of deception have been subjected to empirical analysis. We review the evidence stemming from these studies.
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  2. Andreas Ortmann (2008). Prospecting Neuroeconomics. Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):431-448.
    The following is a set of reading notes on, and questions for, the Neuroeconomics enterprise. My reading of neuroscience evidence seems to be at odds with basic conceptions routinely assumed in the Neuroeconomics literature. I also summarize methodological concerns regarding design, implementation, and statistical evaluation of Neuroeconomics experiments.
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  3. Andreas Ortmann & Michal Ostatnicky (2004). Proper Experimental Design and Implementation Are Necessary Conditions for a Balanced Social Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):352-353.
    We applaud the authors' basic message. We note that the negative research emphasis is not special solely to social psychology and judgment and decision-making. We argue that the proposed integration of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) and Bayesian analysis is promising but will ultimately succeed only if more attention is paid to proper experimental design and implementation.
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  4. Ralph Hertwig & Andreas Ortmann (2001). Experimental Practices in Economics: A Methodological Challenge for Psychologists? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):383-403.
    This target article is concerned with the implications of the surprisingly different experimental practices in economics and in areas of psychology relevant to both economists and psychologists, such as behavioral decision making. We consider four features of experimentation in economics, namely, script enactment, repeated trials, performance-based monetary payments, and the proscription against deception, and compare them to experimental practices in psychology, primarily in the area of behavioral decision making. Whereas economists bring a precisely defined “script” to experiments for participants to (...)
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  5. Ralph Hertwig & Andreas Ortmann (2001). Experimental Practices in Economics: A Methodological Challenge for Psychologists?-Author's Response-Money, Lies, and Replicability: On the Need for Empirically Grounded Experimental Practices. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):433-452.
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  6. Ralph Hertwig & Andreas Ortmann (2001). Money, Lies, and Replicability: On the Need for Empirically Grounded Experimental Practices and Interdisciplinary Discourse. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):433-444.
    This response reinforces the major themes of our target article. The impact of key methodological variables should not be taken for granted. Rather, we suggest grounding experimental practices in empirical evidence. If no evidence is available, decisions about design and implementation ought to be subjected to systematic experimentation. In other words, we argue against empirically blind conventions and against methodological choices based on beliefs, habits, or rituals. Our approach will neither inhibit methodological diversity nor constrain experimental creativity. More (...)
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