13 found
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  1.  13
    Andrew B. Newberg, Nancy Wintering, Mark R. Waldman, Daniel Amen, Dharma S. Khalsa & Abass Alavi (2010). Cerebral Blood Flow Differences Between Long-Term Meditators and Non-Meditators. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):899-905.
    We have studied a number of long-term meditators in previous studies. The purpose of this study was to determine if there are differences in baseline brain function of experienced meditators compared to non-meditators. All subjects were recruited as part of an ongoing study of different meditation practices. We evaluated 12 advanced meditators and 14 non-meditators with cerebral blood flow SPECT imaging at rest. Images were analyzed with both region of interest and statistical parametric mapping. The CBF of long-term meditators was (...)
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  2.  3
    Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (1994). The Near Death Experience as Archetype: A Model for "Prepared" Neurocognitive Processes. Anthropology of Consciousness 5 (4):1-15.
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  3.  13
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (2000). The Neuropsychology of Aesthetic, Spiritual, and Mystical States. Zygon 35 (1):39-51.
  4.  29
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1998). The Neuropsychological Basis of Religions, or Why God Won't Go Away. Zygon 33 (2):187-201.
  5.  13
    Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (2000). The Neuropsychology of Religious and Spiritual Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):251-266.
    This paper considers the neuropsychology of religious and spiritual experiences. This requires a review of our current understanding of brain function as well as an integrated synthesis to derive a neuropsychological model of spiritual experiences. Religious and spiritual experiences are highly complex states that likely involve many brain structures including those involved in higher order processing of sensory and cognitive input as well as those involved in the elaboration of emotions and autonomic responses. Such an analysis can help elucidate the (...)
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  6.  3
    Andrew B. Newberg & Bruce Y. Lee (2005). The Neuroscientific Study of Religious and Spiritual Phenomena: Or Why God Doesn't Use Biostatistics. Zygon 40 (2):469-490.
  7.  19
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1993). Religious and Mystical States: A Neuropsychological Model. Zygon 28 (2):177-200.
  8.  6
    Andrew B. Newberg (2001). Putting the Mystical Mind Together. Zygon 36 (3):501-507.
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  9.  4
    Andrew B. Newberg & Eugene G. D'Aquili (2000). The Creative Brain/The Creative Mind. Zygon 35 (1):53-68.
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  10. Eugene G. D’Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1993). Mystical States and the Experience of God: A Model of the Neuropsychological Substrate. Zygon 28:177-200.
     
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  11.  7
    Bruce Y. Lee & Andrew B. Newberg (2005). Religion and Health: A Review and Critical Analysis. Zygon 40 (2):443-468.
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  12.  5
    Eugene G. D'Aquili & Andrew B. Newberg (1996). Consciousness and the Machine. Zygon 31 (2):235-52.
  13. Eugene G. D'Aquiu, Andrew B. Newberg, Anna Case-Winters, Norbert M. Samuelson, K. Helmut Reich, Which God, Arthur Peacocke, David A. Pailin & VfTOR Westhelle (forthcoming). Think Pieces. Zygon.
     
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