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Andrew F. Smith [18]Andrew F. Smith [2]
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Profile: Andrew F. Smith (Illinois Wesleyan University)
  1.  79
    Andrew F. Smith (2004). William James and the Politics of Moral Conflict. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 40 (1):135 - 151.
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  2.  83
    Andrew F. Smith (2003). Semantic Externalism, Authoritative Self-Knowledge, and Adaptation to Slow Switching. Acta Analytica 18 (30-31):71-87.
    I here argue against the viability of Peter Ludlow’s modified version of Paul Boghossian’s argument for the incompatibility of semantic externalism and authoritative self-knowledge. Ludlow contends that slow switching is not merely actual but is, moreover, prevalent; it can occur whenever we shift between localized linguistic communities. It is therefore quite possible, he maintains, that we undergo unwitting shifts in our mental content on a regular basis. However, there is good reason to accept as plausible that despite their prevalence we (...)
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  3. Andrew F. Smith (2011). The Deliberative Impulse: Motivating Discourse in Divided Societies. Lexington Books.
    Andrew F. Smith argues that citizens of divided societies have three powerful incentives to engage in public deliberation_in free, open, and reasoned dialogue aimed at contributing to the establishment of well-developed laws. When contesting for political influence, or pursuing the enshrinement of one's convictions in law, deliberating publicly is a necessary condition for taking oneself to be a responsible moral, epistemic, and religious agent.
     
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  4.  3
    Andrew F. Smith (2015). Michael Marder. The Philosopher’s Plant: An Intellectual Herbarium. Environmental Philosophy 12 (2):283-286.
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  5.  15
    Andrew F. Smith (2014). In Defense of Homelessness. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (1):33-51.
    In this essay, I offer a twofold defense of homelessness. First, I argue that specifiable socio-economic forms of organization that are common among the homeless and that operate at least partially independently of state and philanthropic institutions embody valuable and worthwhile ways to live and to make a living. Second, the norms underlying the current institutional response to homelessness facilitate psychological distress and social fragmentation not just among the homeless but among the housed as well. As a result, the ways (...)
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  6.  26
    Andrew F. Smith (2012). Secularity and Biblical Literalism: Confronting the Case for Epistemological Diversity. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (3):205-219.
    Stephen Carter argues that biblical literalism is predicated on an epistemological position drastically different than that maintained by mainstream scientists inasmuch as it operates on the basis of a “hermeneutic of inerrancy” with respect to the ideas laid out in the Bible. By relying on considerations offered by Charles Taylor and recent sociological studies, I contend that Carter’s thesis is incorrect. The divide between proponents and opponents of biblical literalism is ethical rather than epistemological. Beyond the philosophical implications of my (...)
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  7.  18
    Andrew F. Smith (2014). Political Deliberation and the Challenge of Bounded Rationality. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (3):269-291.
    Many proponents of deliberative democracy expect reasonable citizens to engage in rational argumentation. However, this expectation runs up against findings by behavioral economists and social psychologists revealing the extent to which normal cognitive functions are influenced by bounded rationality. Individuals regularly utilize an array of biases in the process of making decisions, which inhibits our argumentative capacities by adversely affecting our ability and willingness to be self-critical and to give due consideration to others’ interests. Although these biases cannot be overcome, (...)
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  8.  39
    Birgit Christensen & tr Smith, Andrew F. (2005). Equality and Justice: Remarks on a Necessary Relationship. Hypatia 20 (2):155-163.
    : The processes associated with globalization have reinforced and even increased prevailing conditions of inequality among human beings with respect to their political, economic, cultural, and social opportunities. Yet—or perhaps precisely because of this trend—there has been, within political philosophy, an observable tendency to question whether equality in fact should be treated a as central value within a theory of justice. In response, I examine a number of nonegalitarian positions to try to show that the concept of equality cannot be (...)
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  9.  9
    Andrew F. Smith (2013). Attention Deficit, Yes, But Not Democracy. Social Philosophy Today 29:169-175.
    Ben Berger seeks to provide a number of “modest proposals” intended to prevent widespread and radical political disengagement among citizens. This is the most adverse manifestation of citizens’ invariable “attention deficit,” or their incapacity to maintain the focus and energy necessary to remain deeply and perpetually politically engaged. While attention deficit cannot be overcome, its worst effects can be kept enduringly in check, Berger argues. This is a necessary condition for the maintenance of a functional democracy. Yet I argue that (...)
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  10.  12
    Andrew F. Smith (2003). Pluralism and Political Legitimacy. Social Philosophy Today 19:155-177.
    In recent writings, both John Rawls and Jürgen Habermas address how to ensure that all reasonable citizens have the capacity to live a good life when there exist in modern society a wide variety of competing conceptions thereof. Yet, according to James Bohman, both thinkers in fact fail to resolve this “dilemma of the good.” He offers a deliberative conception of democracy intended to make up for their shortcomings. I argue, however, that Bohman’s conception covertly relies upon moderately perfectionist values (...)
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  11.  26
    Sabine Gürtler & tr Smith, Andrew F. (2005). The Ethical Dimension of Work: A Feminist Perspective. Hypatia 20 (2):119-134.
    : My contribution intends to show that the traditional philosophical concept of work (Marx, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marcuse, Arendt, Habermas, and the rest) leaves out a crucial dimension. Work is reduced, for example, to the interaction with nature, the problem of recognition, or economic self-preservation. But work also establishes an ethical relation having to do with the needs of others and to the common good—a view of work that should be of particular interest for feminist and gender philosophy. This dimension makes (...)
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  12.  10
    Andrew F. Smith (2009). Truth, Negation, and the Limit of Inquiry. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):79-94.
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  13.  20
    Andrew F. Smith (2007). Communication and Conviction: A Jamesian Contribution to Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (4):pp. 259-274.
  14.  3
    Eric Thomas Weber & Andrew F. Smith (2009). Religion and Democratic Citizenship: Inquiry and Conviction in the American Public Square (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (3):449-456.
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  15.  5
    Eric Thomas Weber & Andrew F. Smith (2009). Religion and Democratic Citizenship: Inquiry and Conviction in the American Public Square By J. Caleb Clanton. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (3):449-456.
  16.  4
    Andrew F. Smith (2004). Closer But Still No Cigar. Social Theory and Practice 30 (1):59-71.
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  17.  2
    Andrew F. Smith (2014). Book Review: Pluralism and Liberal Politics, Written by Robert B. Talisse. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (3):368-371.
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  18.  2
    Andrew F. Smith (2014). Religion in the Public Sphere Incentivizing Reciprocal Deliberative Engagement. Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (6):535-554.
    Commonplace among deliberative theorists is the view that, when defending preferred laws and policies, citizens should appeal only to reasons they expect others reasonably to accept. This view has been challenged on the grounds that it places an undue burden on religious citizens who feel duty-bound to appeal to religious reasons to justify preferred positions. In response, I develop a conception of democratic deliberation that provides unlimited latitude regarding the sorts of reasons that can be introduced, so long as one (...)
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  19. Andrew F. Smith (2014). Solidarity as Public Morality: Reconstructing Rorty’s Case for the Political Value of the Philosopher. Contemporary Pragmatism 11 (1):153-170.
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  20. Andrew F. Smith (2013). Talisse's Epistemic Justification of Democracy Reconsidered. Contemporary Pragmatism 10 (1):131-143.