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Profile: Andrew Fenton (California State University, Fresno)
  1. Michael D. Doan & Andrew Fenton (2013). Embodying Autistic Cognition: Towards Reconceiving Certain 'Autism-Related' Behavioral Atypicalities as Functional. In Jami L. Anderson & Simon Cushing (eds.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Some researchers and autistic activists have recently suggested that because some ‘autism-related’ behavioural atypicalities have a function or purpose they may be desirable rather than undesirable. Examples of such behavioural atypicalities include hand-flapping, repeatedly ordering objects (e.g., toys) in rows, and profoundly restricted routines. A common view, as represented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV-TR (APA, 2000), is that many of these behaviours lack adaptive function or purpose, interfere with learning, and constitute the non-social behavioural (...)
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  2. Andrew Fenton (2013). Neuroscience and the Problem of Other Animal Minds: Why It May Not Matter So Much for Neuroethics. The Monist 95 (3):463-485.
    A recent argument in the neuroethics literature has suggested that brain-mental-state identities (one popular expression of what is commonly known as neuroreductionism) promise to settle epistemological uncertainties about nonhuman animal minds. What’s more, these brain-mental-state identities offer the further promise of dismantling the deadlock over the moral status of nonhuman animals, to positive affect in such areas as agriculture and laboratory animal science. I will argue that neuroscientific claims assuming brain-mental-state identities do not so much resolve the problem of other (...)
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  3. Andrew Fenton (2012). Neuroscience and the Problem of Other Animal Minds. The Monist 95 (3):463-485.
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  4. Andrew Fenton (2012). On the Need to Redress an Inadequacy in Animal Welfare Science: Toward an Internally Coherent Framework. Biology and Philosophy 27 (1):73-93.
    The time is ripe for a greater interrogation of assumptions and commitments underlying an emerging common ground on the ethics of animal research as well on the 3 R (replacement, refinement, reduction) approach that parallels, and perhaps even further shapes, it. Recurring pressures to re-evaluate the moral status of some animals in research comes as much from within the relevant sciences as without. It seems incredible, in the light of what we now know of such animals as chimpanzees, to deny (...)
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  5. Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton (2012). The Extreme Male Brain Theory of Autism and the Potential Adverse Effects for Boys and Girls with Autism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):93-103.
    Autism, typically described as a spectrum neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in verbal ability and social reciprocity as well as obsessive or repetitious behaviours, is currently thought to markedly affect more males than females. Not surprisingly, this encourages a gendered understanding of the Autism Spectrum. Simon Baron-Cohen, a prominent authority in the field of autism research, characterizes the male brain type as biased toward systemizing. In contrast, the female brain type is understood to be biased toward empathizing. Since persons with (...)
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  6. Andrew Fenton & Frederic Gilbert (2011). On the Use of Animals in Emergent Embryonic Stem Cell Research for Spinal Cord Injuries. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):37-45.
    In early 2009, President Obama overturned the ban on federal funding for research involving the derivation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) also approved Geron’s first-in-human hESC trial for spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. We anticipate an increase in both research in the United States to derive hESC and applications to the FDA for approval of clinical trials involving transplantation of hESCs. An increase of such clinical trials will require a concomitant increase in the (...)
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  7. Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2011). Review of Disability Bioethics: Moral Bodies, Moral Difference by Jackie Leach Scully. [REVIEW] Hypatia 26 (3):651-655.
  8. Andrew Fenton (2010). Naturalized Bioethics: Toward Responsible Knowing and Practice. By Hilde Lindemann, Marian Verkerk, and Margaret Urban Walker. Hypatia 25 (3):610-613.
  9. Timothy Krahn, Andrew Fenton & Letitia Meynell (2010). Novel Neurotechnologies in Film—a Reading of Steven Spielberg's Minority Report. Neuroethics 3 (1):73-88.
    The portrayal of novel neurotechnologies in Steven Spielberg’s Minority Report serves to inoculate viewers from important moral considerations that are displaced by the film’s somewhat singular emphasis on the question of how to reintroduce freedom of choice into an otherwise technology driven world. This sets up a crisis mentality and presents a false dilemma regarding the appropriate use, and regulation, of neurotechnologies. On the one hand, it seems that centralized power is required to both control and effectively implement such technologies (...)
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  10. Andrew Fenton (2009). Buddhism and Neuroethics: The Ethics of Pharmaceutical Cognitive Enhancement. Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):47-56.
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  11. Andrew Fenton (2009). D. L. Cheney, R. M. Seyfarth, Baboon Metaphysics: The Evolution of a Social Mind. A Review. Biology and Philosophy 24 (1):129-136.
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  12. Andrew Fenton & Tim Krahn (2009). Autism, Neurodiversity and Equality Beyond The'normal'. Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):2.
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  13. Andrew Fenton, Letitia Meynell & Françoise Baylis (2009). Ethical Challenges and Interpretive Difficulties with Non-Clinical Applications of Pediatric fMRI. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):3-13.
    In this article, we critically examine some of the ethical challenges and interpretive difficulties with possible future non-clinical applications of pediatric fMRI with a particular focus on applications in the classroom and the courtroom - two domains in which children come directly in contact with the state. We begin with a general overview of anticipated clinical and non-clinical applications of pediatric fMRI. This is followed by a detailed analysis of a range of ethical challenges and interpretive difficulties that trouble the (...)
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  14. Andrew Fenton, Letitia Meynell & Francoise Baylis (2009). Responsibility and Speculation: On Possible Applications of Pediatric fMRI. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):1-2.
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  15. Timothy Krahn & Andrew Fenton (2009). Autism, Empathy and Questions of Moral Agency. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 39 (2):145-166.
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  16. Andrew Fenton (2008). Merkel, R. Et Al. 2007. Intervening in the Brain: Changing Psyche and Society. New York: Springer: A Review. Neuroethics 1 (3):213-215.
  17. Andrew Fenton, Re-Conceiving Nonhuman Animal Knowledge Through Contemporary Primate Cognitive Studies.
    Abstract In this paper I examine two claims that support the thesis that chimpanzees are substantive epistemic subjects. First, I defend the claim that chimpanzees are evidence gatherers (broadly construed to include the capacity to gather and use evidence). In the course of showing that this claim is probably true I will also show that, in being evidence gatherers, chimpanzees engage in a recognizable epistemic activity. Second, I defend the claim that chimpanzees achieve a degree of epistemic success while engaging (...)
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  18. Andrew Fenton (2008). The Forest and the Trees: Pattern and Meaning in Horace, Odes 1. American Journal of Philology 129 (4):559-580.
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  19. Andrew Fenton & Sheri Alpert (2008). Extending Our View on Using BCIs for Locked-in Syndrome. Neuroethics 1 (2):119-132.
    Locked-in syndrome (LIS) is a severe neurological condition that typically leaves a patient unable to move, talk and, in many cases, initiate communication. Brain Computer Interfaces (or BCIs) promise to enable individuals with conditions like LIS to re-engage with their physical and social worlds. In this paper we will use extended mind theory to offer a way of seeing the potential of BCIs when attached to, or implanted in, individuals with LIS. In particular, we will contend that functionally integrated BCIs (...)
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  20. Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn (2008). Who's to Regret, What's to Regret? American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):42 – 43.
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  21. Françoise Baylis & Andrew Fenton (2007). Chimera Research and Stem Cell Therapies for Human Neurodegenerative Disorders. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):195-208.
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