Search results for 'Andrew G. Nichols' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. Andrew DeWoody, John W. Bickham, Charles H. Michler, Krista M. Nichols, Olin E. Rhodes & Keith E. Woeste (2011). Conservation Genetics for Natural ResourcesMolecular Approaches in Natural Resource Conservation and Management.J. Andrew DeWoody , John W. Bickham , Charles H. Michler , Krista M. Nichols , Olin E. Rhodes Jr. , and Keith E. Woeste , Eds . Cambridge University Press , 2010 . 392 Pp., Illus. $55.00 (ISBN 9780521731348 Paper). [REVIEW] Bioscience 61 (4):330-331.score: 480.0
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  2. Andrew G. Nichols (2011). Ctesias (L.) Llewellyn-Jones, (J.) Robson (Trans.) Ctesias' History of Persia. Tales of the Orient. Pp. X + 253, Ills, Map. London and New York: Routledge, 2010. Cased, £60. ISBN: 978-0-415-36411-9. (J.P.) Stronk (Ed., Trans.) Ctesias' Persian History. Part 1: Introduction, Text, and Translation. (Reihe Geschichte 2.) Pp. Xvi + 422, Ills, Maps. Düsseldorf: Wellem Verlag, 2010. Cased, €79. ISBN: 978-3-941820-01-2. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):399-402.score: 290.0
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  3. Mona Ahmed, Amy Baernstein, Rick Boyte, Mark G. Brennan, Alison S. Clay, David J. Doukas, Denise Gibson, Andrew P. Jacques, Christian J. Krautkramer, Justin M. List, Sandra McNeal, Gwen L. Nichols, Bonnie Salomon, Thomas Schindler, Kathy Stepien & Norma E. Wagoner (2006). Living Professionalism: Reflections on the Practice of Medicine. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 270.0
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  4. Michael Friedman, Robert DiSalle, J. D. Trout, Shaun Nichols, Maralee Harrell, Clark Glymour, Carl G. Wagner, Kent W. Staley, Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla & Frederick M. Kronz (2002). 10. Interpreting Quantum Field Theory Interpreting Quantum Field Theory (Pp. 348-378). Philosophy of Science 69 (2).score: 120.0
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  5. Stephen G. Nichols (1987). Alberto Vàrvaro, Letterature romanze del medioevo. (Saggi, 282.) Bologna: II Mulino, 1985. Paper. Pp. 343. L 25,000. Speculum 62 (4):1002-1005.score: 120.0
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  6. Stephen G. Nichols (1986). Brian Stock, The Implications of Literacy: Written Language and Models of Interpretation in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983. Pp. X, 604. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (1):208-213.score: 120.0
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  7. B. Nichols (1999). Ethnography, Documentary, and Semiotics ('Appropriating Images': The'semiotics of Visual Representation'by Keyan G. Tomaselli). Semiotica 123 (3-4):377-379.score: 120.0
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  8. Aidan Nichols (1986). G. K. Chesterton's Argument for the Existence of God. The Chesterton Review 12 (1):63-70.score: 120.0
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  9. Mike Nichols (2013). G. K. Chesterton and the Gibraltar Literary Festival. The Chesterton Review 39 (3):274-277.score: 120.0
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  10. Stephen G. Nichols (2005). Henri d'Andeli, Les “Dits” d'Henri d'Andeli, Ed. Alain Corbellari. (Les Classiques Français du Moyen Age, 146.) Paris: Honor' Champion, 2003. Paper. Pp. 229; 1 Black-and-Whitefigure. €28. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (1):238-239.score: 120.0
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  11. Stephen G. Nichols (1990). Introduction: Philology in a Manuscript Culture. Speculum 65 (1):1-10.score: 120.0
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  12. Stephen G. Nichols (2001). Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism. Durham, NC, and London: Duke University Press, 1998. Pp. X, 316; 12 Black-and-White Figures. $49.95 (Cloth); $17.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (4):998-1000.score: 120.0
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  13. R. G. Nichols (1990). Speculations on a Catastrophic Future, Education, and Technology. Journal of Thought 25 (1):126-42.score: 120.0
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  14. Stephen G. Nichols (2005). Timothy J. Reiss, Mirages of the Selfe: Patterns of Personhood in Ancient and Early Modern Europe. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2003. Pp. Xxi, 608; Black-and-White Frontispiece and 13 Black-and-White Figures. $70. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (4):1354-1357.score: 120.0
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  15. Aidan Nichols (2009). The Rebellious Discipleship of Father Victor White : Theology and Psychology in a Critic of C.G. Jung. In Craig Steven Titus (ed.), Philosophical Psychology: Psychology, Emotions, and Freedom. Distributed by Catholic University of America Press.score: 120.0
     
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  16. Malcolm Seymour, Trevor Green, Audrey Healy, J. D. G. Evans, Richard Cross, James Ladyman, Katherine J. Morris, W. J. Mander, Christine Battersby, A. W. Moore, Robert Stern, Christopher Hookway, Bob Carruthers, Gary Russell, Dennis Hedlund, Alex Ridgway, Alexander Fyfe, Paul Farrer & Trevor Nichols (eds.) (2006). Western Philosophy. Kultur.score: 120.0
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  17. Shaun Nichols (2002). How Psychopaths Threaten Moral Rationalism. The Monist 85 (2):285-303.score: 60.0
    Over the last 20 years, a number of central figures in moral philosophy have defended some version of moral rationalism, the idea that morality is based on reason or rationality (e.g., Gewirth 1978, Darwall 1983, Nagel 1970, 1986, Korsgaard 1986, Singer 1995; Smith 1994, 1997). According to rationalism, morality is based on reason or rationality rather than the emotions or cultural idiosyncrasies, and this has seemed to many to be the best way of securing a kind of objectivism about moral (...)
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  18. David Rose & Shaun Nichols (2013). The Lesson of Bypassing. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (4):599-619.score: 60.0
    The idea that incompatibilism is intuitive is one of the key motivators for incompatibilism. Not surprisingly, then philosophers who defend incompatibilism often claim that incompatibilism is the natural, commonsense view about free will and moral responsibility (e.g., Pereboom 2001, Kane Journal of Philosophy 96:217–240 1999, Strawson 1986). And a number of recent studies find that people give apparently incompatibilist responses in vignette studies. When participants are presented with a description of a causal deterministic universe, they tend to deny that people (...)
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  19. Edouard Machery, Ron Mallon, Shaun Nichols & Stephen P. Stich (2004). Semantics, Cross-Cultural Style. Cognition 92 (3):1-12.score: 60.0
    Theories of reference have been central to analytic philosophy, and two views, the descriptivist view of reference and the causal-historical view of reference, have dominated the field. In this research tradition, theories of reference are assessed by consulting one’s intuitions about the reference of terms in hypothetical situations. However, recent work in cultural psychology (e.g., Nisbett et al. 2001) has shown systematic cognitive differences between East Asians and Westerners, and some work indicates that this extends to intuitions about philosophical cases (...)
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  20. Shaun Nichols, Stephen Stich & Jonathan M. Weinberg (2003). Metaskepticism: Meditations in Ethnoepistemology. In S. Luper (ed.), The Skeptics. Ashgate. 227--247.score: 60.0
    Throughout the 20th century, an enormous amount of intellectual fuel was spent debating the merits of a class of skeptical arguments which purport to show that knowledge of the external world is not possible. These arguments, whose origins can be traced back to Descartes, played an important role in the work of some of the leading philosophers of the 20th century, including Russell, Moore and Wittgenstein, and they continue to engage the interest of contemporary philosophers. (e.g., Cohen 1999, DeRose 1995, (...)
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  21. Shaun Nichols (2000). The Mind's "I" and the Theory of Mind's "I": Introspection and Two Concepts of Self. Philosophical Topics 28 (2):171-99.score: 60.0
    Introspection plays a crucial role in Modern philosophy in two different ways. From the beginnings of Modern philosophy, introspection has been used a tool for philosophical exploration in a variety of thought experiments. But Modern philosophers (e.g., Locke and Hume) also tried to characterize the nature of introspection as a psychological phenomenon. In contemporary philosophy, introspection is still frequently used in thought experiments. And in the analytic tradition, philosophers have tried to characterize conceptually necessary features of introspection.2 But over the (...)
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  22. Adam Arico, Brian Fiala, Robert F. Goldberg & Shaun Nichols (2011). The Folk Psychology of Consciousness. Mind and Language 26 (3):327-352.score: 60.0
    This paper proposes the ‘AGENCY model’ of conscious state attribution, according to which an entity's displaying certain relatively simple features (e.g. eyes, distinctive motions, interactive behavior) automatically triggers a disposition to attribute conscious states to that entity. To test the model's predictions, participants completed a speeded object/attribution task, in which they responded positively or negatively to attributions of mental properties (including conscious and non-conscious states) to different sorts of entities (insects, plants, artifacts, etc.). As predicted, participants responded positively to conscious (...)
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  23. Jennifer Zamzow & Shaun Nichols (2009). Variations in Ethical Intuitions. In Ernest Sosa & Enrique Villanueva (eds.), Metaethics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.. 368-388.score: 60.0
    Philosophical theorizing is often, either tacitly or explicitly, guided by intuitions about cases. Theories that accord with our intuitions are generally considered to be prima facie better than those that do not. However, recent empirical work has suggested that philosophically significant intuitions are variable and unstable in a number of ways. This variability of intuitions has led naturalistically inclined philosophers to disparage the practice of relying on intuitions for doing philosophy in general (e.g. Stich & Weinberg 2001) and for doing (...)
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  24. Y. Tony Yang & Len M. Nichols (2011). Obesity and Health System Reform: Private Vs. Public Responsibility. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (3):380-386.score: 60.0
    Obesity is a particularly vexing public health challenge, since it not only underlies much disease and health spending but also largely stems from repeated personal behavioral choices. The newly enacted comprehensive health reform law contains a number of provisions to address obesity. For example, insurance companies are required to provide coverage for preventive-health services, which include obesity screening and nutritional counseling. In addition, employers will soon be able to offer premium discounts to workers who participate in wellness programs that emphasize (...)
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  25. Shaun Nichols, College of Charleston.score: 60.0
    Introspection plays a crucial role in Modern philosophy in two different ways. From the beginnings of Modern philosophy, introspection has been used a tool for philosophical exploration in a variety of thought experiments. But Modern philosophers (e.g., Locke and Hume) also tried to characterize the nature of introspection as a psychological phenomenon. In contemporary philosophy, introspection is still frequently used in thought experiments. And in the analytic tradition, philosophers have tried to characterize conceptually necessary features of introspection.2 But over the (...)
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  26. Thomas Nadelhoffer, Saeideh Heshmati, Deanna Kaplan & Shaun Nichols (2013). Folk Retributivism And The Communication Confound. Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):235-261.score: 60.0
    Retributivist accounts of punishment maintain that it is right to punish wrongdoers, even if the punishment has no future benefits. Research in experimental economics indicates that people are willing to pay to punish defectors. A complementary line of work in social psychology suggests that people think that it is right to punish wrongdoers. This work suggests that people are retributivists about punishment. However, all of the extant work contains an important potential confound. The target of the punishment is expected to (...)
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  27. Shaun Nichols (2002). Norms with Feeling: Towards a Psychological Account of Moral Judgment. Cognition 84 (2):221–236.score: 60.0
    There is a large tradition of work in moral psychology that explores the capacity for moral judgment by focusing on the basic capacity to distinguish moral violations (e.g. hitting another person) from conventional violations (e.g. playing with your food). However, only recently have there been attempts to characterize the cognitive mechanisms underlying moral judgment (e.g. Cognition 57 (1995) 1; Ethics 103 (1993) 337). Recent evidence indicates that affect plays a crucial role in mediating the capacity to draw the moral/conventional distinction. (...)
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  28. Susanna Fein (2000). Stephen G. Nichols and Siegfried Wenzel, Eds., The Whole Book: Cultural Perspectives on the Medieval Miscellany.(Recentiores: Later Latin Texts and Contexts.) Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, 1996. Pp. Viii, 188; Black-and-White Figures and 1 Table. $37.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (4):962-967.score: 42.0
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  29. William D. Paden (1999). R. Howard Bloch and Stephen G. Nichols, Eds., Medievalism and the Modernist Temper. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996. Pp. Vii, 496; 8 Black-and-White Figures. $60 (Cloth); $19.95 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (1):128-132.score: 42.0
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  30. Patrick Madigan (2011). G. K. Chesterton: Theologian. By Aidan Nichols. Heythrop Journal 52 (6):1066-1067.score: 36.0
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  31. Alison Gopnik & Andrew N. Meltzoff (1998). Theories Vs. Modules: To the Max and Beyond: A Reply to Poulin-Dubois and to Stich and Nichols. Mind and Language 13 (3):450-456.score: 18.0
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  32. Michael Devitt (2011). Experimental Semantics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (2):418 - 435.score: 12.0
    In their delightfully provocative paper, “Semantics, Cross-Cultural Style,” Edouard Machery, Ron Mallon, Shaun Nichols, and Stephen Stich (2004),[1] make several striking claims about theories of reference. First, they claim: (I) Philosophical views about reference “are assessed by consulting one’s intuitions about the reference of terms in hypothetical situations” (p. B1). This claim is prompted by their observations of the role of intuitions in Saul Kripke’s refutation of the descriptivist view of proper names in favor of a causal-historical view (1980). (...)
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  33. Jonathan Weinberg (2006). What's Epistemology For? The Case for Neopragmatism in Normative Metaepistemology. In S. Hetherington (ed.), Epistemological Futures. Oxford University Press. 26--47.score: 12.0
    How ought we to go about forming and revising our beliefs, arguing and debating our reasons, and investigating our world? If those questions constitute normative epistemology, then I am interested here in normative metaepistemology: the investigation into how we ought to go about forming and revising our beliefs about how we ought to go about forming and revising our beliefs -- how we ought to argue about how we ought to argue. Such investigations have become urgent of late, for the (...)
     
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  34. Justin Sytsma & Jonathan Livengood (2011). A New Perspective Concerning Experiments on Semantic Intuitions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):315-332.score: 12.0
    Machery, Mallon, Nichols, and Stich [2004; forthcoming] use experimental methods to raise a spectre of doubt about reliance on intuitions in developing theories of reference which are then deployed in philosophical arguments outside the philosophy of language. Machery et al. ran a cross-cultural survey asking Western and East Asian participants about a famous case from the philosophical literature on reference (Kripke's G del example). They interpret their results as indicating that there is significant variation in participants' intuitions about semantic (...)
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  35. Jonathan Livengood & Edouard Machery (2007). The Folk Probably Don't Think What You Think They Think: Experiments on Causation by Absence. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 31 (1):107–127.score: 12.0
    Folk theories—untutored people’s (often implicit) theories about various features of the world—have been fashionable objects of inquiry in psychology for almost two decades now (e.g., Hirschfeld and Gelman 1994), and more recently they have been of interest in experimental philosophy (Nichols 2004). Folk theories of psy- chology, physics, biology, and ethics have all come under investigation. Folk meta- physics, however, has not been as extensively studied. That so little is known about folk metaphysics is unfortunate for (at least) two (...)
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  36. Philip Robbins (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Ins and Outs of Introspection. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1100-1102.score: 12.0
    Philosophical interest in introspection has a long and storied history, but only recently – with the 'scientific turn' in philosophy of mind – have philosophers sought to ground their accounts of introspection in psychological data. In particular, there is growing awareness of how evidence from clinical and developmental psychology might be brought to bear on long-standing debates about the architecture of introspection, especially in the form of apparent dissociations between introspection and third-person mental-state attribution. It is less often noticed that (...)
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  37. Susan Dwyer, Moral Psychology as Cognitive Science: Explananda and Acquisition.score: 12.0
    Depending on how one looks at it, we have been enjoying or suffering a significant empirical turn in moral psychology during this first decade of the 21st century. While philosophers have, from time to time, considered empirical matters with respect to morality, those who took an interest in actual (rather than ideal) moral agents were primarily concerned with whether particular moral theories were ‘too demanding’ for creatures like us (Flanagan, 1991; Williams, 1976; Wolf, 1982). Faithful adherence to Utilitarianism or Kantianism (...)
     
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  38. Andrew Louth (2008). Wisdom From Above: A Primer in the Theology of Father Sergei Bulgakov. By Aidan Nichols, O.P. Heythrop Journal 49 (2):346–348.score: 12.0
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  39. D. Boatman, S. Boudelaa, C. A. Camp, A. Damasio, H. Damasio, N. F. Dronkers, S. A. Gelman, T. Grabowski, G. Hickok & P. Indefrey (2004). Mallon, R., B1 Marslen-Wilson, WD, 271 Navarra, J., B13 Nichols, S., B1. Cognition 92:353.score: 12.0
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  40. Jeremy Fernando (2011). Bang Bang - A Response to Vincent W.J. Van Gerven Oei. Continent 1 (3):224-228.score: 12.0
    On 22 July, 2011, we were confronted with the horror of the actions of Anders Behring Breivik. The instant reaction, as we have seen with similar incidents in the past—such as the Oklahoma City bombings—was to attempt to explain the incident. Whether the reasons given were true or not were irrelevant: the fact that there was a reason was better than if there were none. We should not dismiss those that continue to cling on to the initial claims of a (...)
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  41. Patrick Clipsham (forthcoming). Does Empirical Moral Psychology Rest on a Mistake? Philosophical Studies.score: 9.0
    Many philosophers assume that philosophical theories about the psychological nature of moral judgment can be confirmed or disconfirmed by the kind of evidence gathered by natural and social scientists (especially experimental psychologists and neuroscientists). I argue that this assumption is mistaken. For the most part, empirical evidence can do no work in these philosophical debates, as the metaphorical heavy-lifting is done by the pre-experimental assumptions that make it possible to apply empirical data to these philosophical debates. For the purpose of (...)
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  42. Lauren Hartzell-Nichols (2012). How is Climate Change Harmful? Ethics and the Environment 17 (2):97-110.score: 6.0
    Discussions of harm are central in the climate ethics literature. Especially in the rapidly emerging body of work addressing the question of whether or not individuals are morally responsible for their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, whether or in what way individuals’ emissions are harmful is a hotly debated question. John Nolt’s recent paper, “How harmful are the average American’s greenhouse gas emissions?” illustrates the prevalence of this framing (Nolt 2011). Here I take a step back and ask what we mean (...)
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  43. Andrew Tallon (2003). Doctrinal Development and Wisdom. Philosophy and Theology 15 (2):353-383.score: 6.0
    This essay takes its starting point from the position of Aidan Nichols (From Newman to Congar: The Idea of Doctrinal Development from the Victorians to the Second Vatican Council) that doctrinal development depends on wisdom. A key figure for Nichols’s position is Pierre Rousselot, whose idea of sympathetic knowing helps explain how wisdom itself works, namely, as knowledge influenced by love. I focus on Rousselot’s use of the Thomist concept of connaturality as the underlying basis of sympathetic knowing (...)
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  44. Nicholas C. Coops, Thomas Hilker, Forrest G. Hall, Caroline J. Nichol & Guillaume G. Drolet (2010). Estimation of Light-Use Efficiency of Terrestrial Ecosystems From Space: A Status Report. Bioscience 60 (10):788-797.score: 4.7
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  45. S. G. Nicholls (2010). Knowledge or Understanding? Informed Choice in the Context of Newborn Bloodspot Screening. Public Health Ethics 3 (2):128-136.score: 4.0
    The UK has a long established programme of newborn bloodspot screening. This operates under a model of informed choice. Understanding is central to the `informed’ element of an informed choice yet it is rarely assessed. To date most research within the context of newborn bloodspot screening has focussed on parental recall of information. In this paper I argue that simplistic assessments of knowledge through recall fail to reflect more complex notions of understanding. In support of this contention I draw on (...)
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  46. H. H. Price, David Pears, William Kneale, Max Black, A. F. Peters, George E. Hughes, Margaret Macdonald, G. J. Warnock, T. D. Weldon, R. F. Holland, H. D. Lewis, Antony Flew, W. G. Maclagan, J. Harrison, Richard Wollheim, P. L. Heath, Donald Nicholl, Patrick Gardiner & Ernest Gellner (1951). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 60 (240):550-583.score: 4.0
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  47. S. G. Nicholls (2012). Proceduralisation, Choice and Parental Reflections on Decisions to Accept Newborn Bloodspot Screening. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (5):299-303.score: 4.0
    Newborn screening is the programme through which newborn babies are screened for a variety of conditions shortly after birth. Programmes such as this are individually oriented but resemble traditional public health programmes because they are targeted at large groups of the population and they are offered as preventive interventions to a population considered healthy. As such, an ethical tension exists between the goals of promoting the high uptake of supposedly ‘effective’ population-oriented programmes and the goal of promoting genuinely informed decision-making. (...)
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  48. Stuart G. Nicholls, Jamie Brehaut & Raphae Saginur (2012). Social Science and Ethics Review: A Question of Practice Not Principle. Research Ethics 8 (2):71-78.score: 4.0
    In his article ‘The case against ethics review in the social sciences’, Schrag asserts that the social sciences should not be subject to ethical review. He recounts a number of examples where ethical review has seemingly failed. He further suggests some alternative models for dealing with ethical review in the social sciences. Finally, he concludes, and we concur, that there is a lack of empirical evidence as to the benefit of research ethics review.
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  49. Michael Chanan, Jack Hazan, Andrew Carchrae, Henry Ward, Michael Nyman, Brian Nicholls & Noel Chanan, I'm Going to Tamper with Your Beliefs a Little.score: 4.0
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  50. Roderick Nicholls (2002). Andrew R. Murphy, Conscience and Community: Revisiting Toleration and Religious Dissent in Early Modern England and America Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (2):132-134.score: 4.0
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