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Profile: Andrew Huddleston (Birkbeck College)
  1. Andrew Huddleston, Erlösung Dem Erlöser.
    Book synopsis: This volume documents the cultural-philosophical, aesthetic, and political dimensions of the confrontation between Nietzsche and Wagner from contemporary sources. It is the first comprehensive review to be published since the 1980s. Besides the aesthetic and cultural-philosophical dimensions of their differences, the issue of anti-Semitism is also explored, for which Wagner’s essay “Judaism in Music” is paradigmatic.
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  2. Andrew Huddleston, Beyond Judgment: Expanding Aesthetic Normativity.
    Event synopsis: The normative force of aesthetic perception, deliberation and judgement has been a topic of discussion in philosophy for many centuries: Aristotle writes of the universal elements of aesthetic value; Hume discusses how we can account for wide-spread agreements about taste and establish criteria for aesthetic normativity; and Kant urges us to resolve the Antinomy of Taste and explains why aesthetic judgements “lay claim to universal assent” in terms steeped in his philosophy of mind. More recently, however, the power (...)
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  3. Andrew Huddleston (2014). "Consecration to Culture": Nietzsche on Slavery and Human Dignity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):135-160.
    In the Infamous Opening Sections from Part IX of Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche celebrates a strident kind of elitism and countenances, in however attenuated a form, the institution of slavery. “Every enhancement of the type ‘man,’” he writes, “has so far been the work of an aristocratic society—and it will be so again and again—a society that believes in the long ladder of an order of rank and difference in worth [Werthverschiedenheit] between man and man, and that needs slavery (...)
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  4. Andrew Huddleston, Finding Content in Absolute Music.
    Event synopsis: The use of gesticulation has always been a means by which human beings have expressed themselves. Being bodily rather than conceptual its logos lies outside language. Within the fields of art and aesthetics, gesture implies an opening process as a distinctive way of cognition as well as an approach to a particular quality of some works. When François Lyotard connects the artwork with gesture, he underlines that the work creates itself through gesture, through process and Roland Barthes links (...)
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  5. Andrew Huddleston (2014). Hegel on Comedy: Theodicy, Social Criticism, and the 'Supreme Task' of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):227-240.
    According to Hegel, art in its ‘supreme task’ is engaged in ‘bringing to our minds and expressing the Divine, the deepest interests of mankind, and the most comprehensive truths of the spirit’. Raymond Geuss, in a highly illuminating paper, has connected Hegel’s conception of art’s supreme task with the project of theodicy. In this paper I explore Hegel’s aesthetics of comedy through this theodicy-based framework Geuss has proposed, and I consider what light this framework can shed on comedy and, reciprocally, (...)
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  6. Andrew Huddleston, Normativity and the Will to Power: Challenges for a Nietzschean Constitutivism.
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  7. Andrew Huddleston (2014). Nietzsche's Meta-Axiology: Against the Sceptical Readings. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):322-342.
    In this paper, I treat the question of the meta-axiological standing of Nietzsche's own values, in the service of which he criticizes morality. Does Nietzsche, I ask, regard his perfectionistic valorization of human excellence and cultural flourishing over other ideals to have genuine evaluative standing, in the sense of being correct, or at least adequate to a matter-of-fact? My goal in this paper is modest, but important: it is not to attribute to Nietzsche some sophisticated meta-axiological view, because I am (...)
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  8. Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche on the Decadence of Individuals and Cultures.
    In 1872 Nietzsche shocked the European philological community with the publication of the Birth of Tragedy. In this fervid first book Nietzsche looked to ancient Greek culture in the hope of finding the path to a revitalization of modern German culture. Cultural health was at this point unquestionably his paramount concern. Yet postwar Nietzsche scholarship has typically held that after his Untimely Meditations which followed soon after, Nietzsche’s philosophy took a sharply individualist turn—an interpretation largely due to Walter Kaufmann’s noble (...)
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  9. Andrew Huddleston (2014). Scruton's Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (1):104-107.
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  10. Andrew Huddleston, Book Review: "Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives", by Amy Coplan and Peter Goldie (Oxford University Press, 2011). [REVIEW]
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  11. Andrew Huddleston, Book Review: "Scruton's Aesthetics", by Andy Hamilton and Nick Zangwill (Palgrave & Macmillan, 2012). [REVIEW]
    Few philosophers have published at the impressively prolific rate that Roger Scruton has. Of the forty-two books by Scruton listed in a special bibliography at the end of Scruton’s Aesthetics, no fewer than nine of them have been devoted to topics in aesthetics. The present volume, edited by Andy Hamilton and Nick Zangwill, arises out of a 2008 conference devoted to Scruton’s seminal work in this field. While sympathetic in tone, the majority of the essays critically engage with Scruton’s views (...)
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  12. Andrew Huddleston (2013). Coplan, Amy and Peter Goldie. Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press, 2011, Xlvii + 382 Pp., $99.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):294-296.
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  13. Andrew Huddleston, Kunstreligion Redeemed: From Religion to Art in Wagner's Parsifal.
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  14. Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche on Decadence and its Remedies.
    Event synopsis: This conference will explore Friedrich Nietzsche's critical relation to Kantian political philosophy. Taking 'Kantian politics' to include modern and contemporary Kantian theories as well as Kant's own theories, the conference will examine Nietzsche's engagement with such Kantian themes as autonomy and rights, equality and democracy, morality and politics, war and cosmopolitanism, history and anthropology. The speakers are renowned scholars of political philosophy from the United States and Europe, and the format of the conferences involves the pre-circulation of papers (...)
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  15. Andrew Huddleston, Truth and the Ambitions of Great Art.
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  16. Andrew Huddleston & E. Lord, Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Can't Lose: Friday Night Lights and the Value of Inspiration.
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  17. Andrew Huddleston, Art as Culture and Culture as Art: Tracing a Theme From the Birth of Tragedy to Nietzsche's Later Work.
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  18. Andrew Huddleston (2012). In Defense of Artistic Value. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):705-714.
    Is there a distinctively artistic value that works of art have over and above their aesthetic value? No, Dominic McIver Lopes claims in a recent paper. He canvases various non-aesthetic options for underwriting artistic value. Yet he dispenses too quickly with a promising account of artistic value that would look to the artwork's status as an achievement as the basis of its value: On this achievement-based view, the value of the work of art as art (that is, its distinctively artistic (...)
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  19. Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche and the Contingency of Greatness.
    Event synopsis: Contingent is what could be otherwise or not exist at all: It is thus what is neither necessary nor impossible. What is contingent is that which is not completely determined by logical or metaphysical principles, or else by fate or divine providence. That is, what is contingent belongs to the realm of what is changing or changeable; it is, therefore, a realm into which human actions inherently fall. Because human actions take place in the realm of the contingent, (...)
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  20. Andrew Huddleston (2012). Naughty Beliefs. Philosophical Studies 160 (2):209-222.
    Can a person ever occurrently believe p and yet have the simultaneous, occurrent belief q that this very belief that p is false? Surely not, most would say: that description of a person’s epistemic economy seems to misunderstand the very concept of belief. In this paper I question this orthodox assumption. There are, I suggest, cases where we have a first-order mental state m that involves taking the world to be a certain way, yet although we ourselves acknowledge that we (...)
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  21. Andrew Huddleston, Artistic Value.
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  22. Andrew Huddleston, Book Review: "The Development of Ethics: A Historical and Critical Study" by Terence Irwin (Oxford University Press, 2009). [REVIEW]
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  23. Andrew Huddleston, In Defense of Artistic Value as Achievement Value.
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  24. Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche on the Standing of Values.
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  25. Andrew Huddleston, The Grounds for Nietzsche's Critique of Morality.
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  26. Andrew Huddleston, Das Ganze Lebt Uberhaupt Nicht Mehr: Nietzsche on the Decadence of Individuals and Cultures.
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  27. Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche's Cultural Perfectionism.
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  28. Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche's Holistic Perfectionism.
    Event synopsis: The conference hosts an internationally renowned line-up of Nietzsche specialists to assess the nature and significance of Nietzsche’s ‘postmoral’ ideal, and to evaluate Nietzsche’s challenges to modern moral philosophy.
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  29. Andrew Huddleston, The Location of Artistic Value: Against Aesthetic Consumerism.
    Book synopsis: Art is a peculiar topic for philosophy. Philosophy dissociates itself from art on the one hand, but realigns itself with it on the other hand. Philosophy frequently disassociates itself from art owing to the relationship art bears with truth, for artistic expressions of the human mind do not respect any obligation to knowledge of truth or the good. Plato’s critical treatment of the poet prefigures this motif: Art is dangerous because it threatens to dissolve the standards of objective (...)
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  30. Andrew Huddleston, Intention and Conversation.
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  31. Andrew Huddleston, Literature and Philosophical Conversation.
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  32. Andrew Huddleston, Nietzsche on the Will to Truth.
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  33. Andrew Huddleston, The Consolations of Art.
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