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Profile: Andrew Huddleston (Oxford University)
  1. Andrew Huddleston (2014). "Consecration to Culture": Nietzsche on Slavery and Human Dignity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):135-160.
    In the Infamous Opening Sections from Part IX of Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche celebrates a strident kind of elitism and countenances, in however attenuated a form, the institution of slavery. “Every enhancement of the type ‘man,’” he writes, “has so far been the work of an aristocratic society—and it will be so again and again—a society that believes in the long ladder of an order of rank and difference in worth [Werthverschiedenheit] between man and man, and that needs slavery (...)
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  2. Andrew Huddleston (2014). Nietzsche's Meta-Axiology: Against the Sceptical Readings. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):322-342.
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  3. Andrew Huddleston (2014). Scruton's Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (1):104-107.
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  4. Andrew Huddleston (2013). Coplan, Amy and Peter Goldie. Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press, 2011, Xlvii + 382 Pp., $99.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):294-296.
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  5. Andrew Huddleston (2012). In Defense of Artistic Value. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):705-714.
    Is there a distinctively artistic value that works of art have over and above their aesthetic value? No, Dominic McIver Lopes claims in a recent paper. He canvases various non-aesthetic options for underwriting artistic value. Yet he dispenses too quickly with a promising account of artistic value that would look to the artwork's status as an achievement as the basis of its value: On this achievement-based view, the value of the work of art as art (that is, its distinctively artistic (...)
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  6. Andrew Huddleston (2012). Naughty Beliefs. Philosophical Studies 160 (2):209-222.
    Can a person ever occurrently believe p and yet have the simultaneous, occurrent belief q that this very belief that p is false? Surely not, most would say: that description of a person’s epistemic economy seems to misunderstand the very concept of belief. In this paper I question this orthodox assumption. There are, I suggest, cases where we have a first-order mental state m that involves taking the world to be a certain way, yet although we ourselves acknowledge that we (...)
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