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Profile: Andrew I. Cohen (Georgia State University)
  1. Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher H. Wellman (eds.) (2014). Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley Blackwell.
    Now in an updated edition with fresh perspectives on high-profile ethical issues such as torture and same-sex marriage, this collection pairs cogently argued essays by leading philosophers with opposing views on fault-line public concerns. Revised and updated new edition with six new pairs of essays on prominent contemporary issues including torture and same-sex marriage, and a survey of theories of ethics by Stephen Darwall Leading philosophers tackle colleagues with opposing views in contrasting essays on core issues in applied ethics An (...)
     
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  2.  6
    Andrew I. Cohen (2016). Vicarious Apologies as Moral Repair. Ratio 29 (2).
    Apologies are key components of moral repair. They can identify a wrong, express regret, and accept culpability for some transgression. Apologies can vindicate a victim's value as someone who was due different treatment. This paper explores whether acts with vicarious elements may serve as apologies. I offer a functionalist account of apologies: acts are apologies not so much by having correct ingredients but by serving certain apologetic functions. Those functions can be realized in multiple ways. Whether the offenders are individuals (...)
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  3.  56
    Andrew I. Cohen (2009). Compensation for Historic Injustices: Completing the Boxill and Sher Argument. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (1):81-102.
  4.  30
    Andrew I. Cohen (2007). Contractarianism, Other-Regarding Attitudes, and the Moral Standing of Nonhuman Animals. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (2):188–201.
  5.  6
    Andrew I. Cohen (forthcoming). Corrective Vs. Distributive Justice: The Case of Apologies. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    This paper considers the relation of corrective to distributive justice. I discuss the shortfalls of one sort of account that holds these are independent domains of justice. To support a more modest claim that these are sometimes independent domains of justice, I focus instead on the case of apologies. Apologies are sometimes among the measures specified by corrective justice. I argue that the sorts of injustices that apologies can help to correct need not always be departures from ideals specified by (...)
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  6.  19
    Andrew I. Cohen (2009). Contractarianism and Interspecies Welfare Conflicts. Social Philosophy and Policy 26 (1):227-257.
    In this essay I describe how contractarianism might approach interspecies welfare conflicts. I start by discussing a contractarian account of the moral status of nonhuman animals. I argue that contractors can agree to norms that would acknowledge the of some animals. I then discuss how the norms emerging from contractarian agreement might constrain any comparison of welfare between humans and animals. Contractarian agreement is likely to express some partiality to humans in a way that discounts the welfare of some or (...)
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  7.  9
    Andrew I. Cohen & Jennifer A. Samp (2013). On the Possibility of Corporate Apologies. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):741-762.
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  8.  22
    Andrew I. Cohen (2004). Must Rights Impose Enforceable Positive Duties? Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):264–276.
  9.  58
    Andrew I. Cohen (2008). Dependent Relationships and the Moral Standing of Nonhuman Animals. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 1-21.
    This essay explores whether dependent relationships might justify extending direct moral consideration to nonhuman animals. After setting out a formal conception of moral standing as relational, scalar, and unilateral, I consider whether and how an appeal to dependencies might be the basis for an animal’s moral standing. If dependencies generate reasons for extending direct moral consideration, such reasons will admit of significant variations in scope and stringency.
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  10.  19
    Andrew I. Cohen (2002). Warmongers, Martyrs, and Madmen Versus the Hobbesian Laws of Nature. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):561 - 586.
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  11.  8
    Andrew I. Cohen (1997). Virtues, Opportunities, and the Right To Do Wrong. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (2):43-55.
  12.  5
    Andrew I. Cohen (1998). Retained Liberties and Absolute Hobbesian Authorization. Hobbes Studies 11 (1):33-45.
    Hobbes claims that the sovereign's absolute authority is consistent with the subjects' retaining liberties to resist certain commands. In this essay, I explore what it means for subject to authorize a sovereign with a right to command. I show how retained rights are compatible with sovereignty. Though any given subject does not authorize the sovereign to do anything, I argue that the sovereign power is absolute. The sovereign has the most power anyone could command.
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  13.  3
    Andrew I. Cohen (2011). Lloyd , S. A. Morality in the Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes: Cases in the Law of Nature. [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (2):460-465.
    New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. 436. $90.00 (cloth).
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  14.  3
    Andrew I. Cohen (2005). Introduction. Legal Theory 11 (3):163-168.
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    Andrew I. Cohen (2003). Examining the Bonds and Bounds of Friendship. Dialogue 42 (2):321-343.
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  16. Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2014). Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Now in an updated edition with fresh perspectives on high-profile ethical issues such as torture and same-sex marriage, this collection pairs cogently argued essays by leading philosophers with opposing views on fault-line public concerns. Revised and updated new edition with six new pairs of essays on prominent contemporary issues including torture and same-sex marriage, and a survey of theories of ethics by Stephen Darwall Leading philosophers tackle colleagues with opposing views in contrasting essays on core issues in applied ethics An (...)
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  17. Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2005). Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics_ features pairs of newly commissioned essays by some of the leading theorists working in the field today. Brings together fresh debates on eleven of the most controversial issues in applied ethics Topics addressed include abortion, affirmative action, animals, capital punishment, cloning, euthanasia, immigration, pornography, privacy in civil society, values in nature, and world hunger. Lively debate format sharply defines the issues, and paves the way for further discussion. Will serve as an accessible introduction to the (...)
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  18. Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2005). Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics_ features pairs of newly commissioned essays by some of the leading theorists working in the field today. Brings together fresh debates on eleven of the most controversial issues in applied ethics Topics addressed include abortion, affirmative action, animals, capital punishment, cloning, euthanasia, immigration, pornography, privacy in civil society, values in nature, and world hunger. Lively debate format sharply defines the issues, and paves the way for further discussion. Will serve as an accessible introduction to the (...)
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  19. Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2013). Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Now in an updated edition with fresh perspectives on high-profile ethical issues such as torture and same-sex marriage, this collection pairs cogently argued essays by leading philosophers with opposing views on fault-line public concerns. Revised and updated new edition with six new pairs of essays on prominent contemporary issues including torture and same-sex marriage, and a survey of theories of ethics by Stephen Darwall Leading philosophers tackle colleagues with opposing views in contrasting essays on core issues in applied ethics An (...)
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  20. Andrew I. Cohen & Christopher Heath Wellman (eds.) (2008). Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _Contemporary Debates in Applied Ethics_ features pairs of newly commissioned essays by some of the leading theorists working in the field today. Brings together fresh debates on eleven of the most controversial issues in applied ethics Topics addressed include abortion, affirmative action, animals, capital punishment, cloning, euthanasia, immigration, pornography, privacy in civil society, values in nature, and world hunger. Lively debate format sharply defines the issues, and paves the way for further discussion. Will serve as an accessible introduction to the (...)
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  21. Andrew I. Cohen (1994). Hobbesian Political Authority and the Right of Resistance. Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Besides commanding coercive power, a political authority is supposed to offer directives which ought to exclude private judgment. Any defense of inalienable rights or limited rights of resistance suggests some legitimate residual private judgment. Such retained rights threaten to undermine the binding force of authoritative directives. ;The case of Hobbesian sovereignty typifies this problem. Hobbes claims agents must establish permanent and absolute political authorities, and they can do so only by completely submitting themselves to a sovereign power whose public will (...)
     
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  22. Andrew I. Cohen (2014). Philosophy, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Introduction. Routledge.
    What makes a policy work? What should policies attempt to do, and what ought they not do? These questions are at the heart of both policy-making and ethics. Philosophy, Ethics and Public Policy: An Introduction examines these questions and more. Andrew I. Cohen uses contemporary examples and controversies, mainly drawn from policy in a North American context, to illustrate important flashpoints in ethics and public policy, such as: public policy and globalization: sweatshops; medicine and the developing world; immigration marriage, family (...)
     
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  23. Andrew I. Cohen (2014). Philosophy, Ethics, and Public Policy: An Introduction. Routledge.
    What makes a policy work? What should policies attempt to do, and what _ought_ they not do? These questions are at the heart of both policy-making and ethics. _Philosophy, Ethics and Public Policy: An Introduction _examines these questions and more. Andrew I. Cohen uses contemporary examples and controversies, mainly drawn from policy in a North American context, to illustrate important flashpoints in ethics and public policy, such as: public policy and globalization: sweatshops; medicine and the developing world; immigration marriage, family (...)
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  24. Andrew I. Cohen (2010). Review of Christopher W. Morris (Ed.), Amartya Sen. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (5).
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