6 found
Sort by:
  1. Andrew J. Dell’Olio (2010). Do Near-Death Experiences Provide a Rational Basis for Belief in Life After Death? Sophia 49 (1):113 - 128.
    In this paper I suggest that near-death experiences (NDEs) provide a rational basis for belief in life after death. My argument is a simple one and is modeled on the argument from religious experience for the existence of God. But unlike the proponents of the argument from religious experience, I stop short of claiming that NDEs prove the existence of life after death. Like the argument from religious experience, however, my argument turns on whether or not there is good reason (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andrew J. Dell’Olio (2008). The Metaphysics of Creation. Faith and Philosophy 25 (4):465-466.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Andrew Jerome Dell’Olio (2007). Response to Wesley J. Wildman's “Behind, Between, and Beyond Anthropomorphic Models of Ultimate Reality”. Philosophia 35 (3-4):427-432.
    This is a response to Wesley J. Wildman’s “Behind, Between, and Beyond Anthropomorphic Models of Ultimate Reality.” While I agree with much of what Wildman writes, I raise questions concerning standards for evaluating models of ultimate reality and the plausibility of ranking such models. This paper was delivered during the APA Pacific 2007 Mini-Conference on Models of God.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Andrew J. Dell’Olio (2003). Zhu Xi and Thomas Aquinas on the Foundations of Moral Self-Cultivation. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 77:235-246.
    The twelfth-century Neo-Confucian philosopher, Zhu Xi, has often been compared to the thirteenth-century Christian philosopher, Thomas Aquinas. In this essay, I explore the similarities between these two thinkers, focusing on their respective accounts of the metaphysical foundations of moral self-cultivation. I suggestthat both philosophers play similar roles within their respective traditions and share similar aims. In general, both philosophers seek to appropriate ideas of rivalintellectual traditions in order to extend the moral vision of their home traditions, and both hope to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Andrew J. Dell’Olio (1998). God, the Self, and the Ethics of Virtue. Philosophy and Theology 11 (1):47-70.
    One motivation for the recent interest in virtue ethics in contemporary moral thought is the view that deontological or duty-based ethics requires the notion of God as absolute law giver. It has been claimed by Elizabeth Anscombe, for example, that there could be no coherent moral obligation, no moral ought, independent of divine command, and that, in the absence of belief in God, moral philosophy best pursue an ethic of character or virtue over an ethic of obligation or duty. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Andrew J. Dell’Olio (1998). Why Not God the Mother? Faith and Philosophy 15 (2):193-209.
    This essay considers recent criticism of the use of inclusive language within Christian discourse, particularly the reference to God as “Mother.” The author argues that these criticisms fail to establish that the supplemental usage of “God the Mother,” in addition to the traditional usage of “God the Father,” is inappropriate for Christian God-talk. Some positive reasons for referring to God as “Mother” are also offered, not the least of which is its helpfulness in overcoming overly restrictive conceptions of God.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation