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Profile: Andrew J. Nicholson (State University of New York, Stony Brook)
  1.  46
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2010). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Columbia University Press.
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as belonging (...)
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  2.  4
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2016). The Bhagavad Gita: A Biography by Richard H. Davis. Philosophy East and West 66 (1):354-356.
    The “Lives of Great Religious Books” from Princeton University Press is a series with the worthy goal of introducing general readers to major works from many different traditions. The phrase “lives of” indicates that the point is not just to elucidate the work’s meaning but also to trace how it has been interpreted between the time of its composition and the present day. In Richard H. Davis, the author of one previous book on visual culture in India and another dealing (...)
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  3.  23
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2013). Is Yoga Hindu? On the Fuzziness of Religious Boundaries. Common Knowledge 19 (3):490-505.
    This contribution to the Common Knowledge symposium “Fuzzy Studies” explores the boundaries between religions by exploring the ambiguous place of yoga in various religious traditions, both modern and premodern. Recently, certain Hindus and Christians have tried to argue that yoga is an essentially Hindu practice, making their case by appealing to the Yoga Sutras, a text by the Sanskrit author Patanjali. However, on closer examination, the Yoga Sutras seem to exist in a fuzzy, indeterminate space that is not quite “Hindu” (...)
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  4.  44
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2007). Reconciling Dualism and Non-Dualism: Three Arguments in Vijñānabhikṣu's Bhedābheda Vedānta. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (4):371-403.
    The late 16th century Indian philosopher Vijñānabhikṣu is most well known today for his commentaries on Sāṃkhya and Yoga texts. However, the majority of his extant corpus belongs to the tradition of Bhedābheda (Difference and Non-Difference) Vedānta. This article elucidates three Vedāntic arguments from Vijñānabhikṣu’s voluminous commentary on the Brahma Sūtra, entitled Vijñānāmṛtabhāṣya (Commentary on the Nectar of Knowledge). The first section of the article explores the meaning of bhedābheda, showing that in Vijñānabhikṣu’s understanding, “difference and non-difference” does not entail (...)
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  5.  7
    Jeffrey M. Perl, Tim Beasley-Murray, Ardis Butterfield, Gerard Wiegers, Andrew J. Nicholson, Johan Elverskog, Daniel J. Sharfstein & Dariusz Gafijczuk (forthcoming). Fuzzy Studies: A Symposium on the Consequence of Blur. Common Knowledge 19 (3):411-423.
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  6.  21
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2007). Samādhi: The Numinous and Cessative in Indo-Tibetan Yoga (Review). Philosophy East and West 58 (1):157-159.
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  7.  12
    Andrew J. Nicholson, Bhedābheda Vedānta. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  8.  29
    Andrew J. Nicholson (2014). Lord Siva's Song: The Isvara Gita. State University of New York Press.
    While the Bhagavad Gītā is an acknowledged treasure of world spiritual literature, few people know a parallel text, the Īśvara Gītā. This lesser-known work is also dedicated to a god, but in this case it is Śiva, rather than Kṛṣṇa, who is depicted as the omniscient creator of the world. Andrew J. Nicholson’s Lord Śiva’s Song makes this text available in English in an accessible new translation. A work of both poetry and philosophy, the Īśvara Gītā builds on the insights (...)
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  9. Andrew J. Nicholson (2013). Unifying Hinduism: Philosophy and Identity in Indian Intellectual History. Cup.
    Some postcolonial theorists argue that the idea of a single system of belief known as "Hinduism" is a creation of nineteenth-century British imperialists. Andrew J. Nicholson introduces another perspective: although a unified Hindu identity is not as ancient as some Hindus claim, it has its roots in innovations within South Asian philosophy from the fourteenth to seventeenth centuries. During this time, thinkers treated the philosophies of Vedanta, Samkhya, and Yoga, along with the worshippers of Visnu, Siva, and Sakti, as belonging (...)
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