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Andrew Lister [19]Andrew D. Lister [1]
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Profile: Andrew Lister (Queen's University)
  1. Andrew Lister (2013). The Classical Tilt of Justificatory Liberalism. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (3):316-326.
    This paper is a review of Gerald Gaus's The Order of Public Reason. Its initial purpose is to explain how the overall argument of the book is meant to hang together. It also identifies four points at which the argument might be challenged, particularly as it relates to justificatory liberalism’s ‘classical tilt’.
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  2.  37
    Andrew Lister (2010). Liberal Foundations of Democratic Authority. Representation 46 (1):19-34.
    In Democratic Authority, David Estlund argues that decision-procedures are to be judged solely by their tendency to generate morally superior decisions, but that because any relationship of authority must be acceptable to all qualified moral points of view, the epistemic benefits of less equal procedures must be evident beyond qualified objection. If all doctrines involved in political justification must be qualifiedly acceptable, however, the qualified acceptability requirement must itself be acceptable to qualified points of view. This article provides reasons for (...)
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  3.  46
    Andrew Lister (2010). Public Justification and the Limits of State Action. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 9 (2):151-175.
    One objection to the principle of public reason is that since there is room for reasonable disagreement about distributive justice as well as about human flourishing, the requirement of reasonable acceptability rules out redistribution as well as perfectionism. In response, some justificatory liberals have invoked the argument from higher-order unanimity, or nested inclusiveness. If it is not reasonable to reject having some system of property rights, and if redistribution is just the enforcement of a different set of property rights, redistribution (...)
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  4.  33
    Andrew Lister (2007). Public Reason and Moral Compromise. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):1-34.
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  5.  10
    Andrew Lister (2013). The “Mirage” of Social Justice: Hayek Against (and For) Rawls. Critical Review 25 (3-4):409-444.
    There is an odd proximity between Hayek, hero of the libertarian right, and Rawls, theorist of social justice, because, at the level of principle, Hayek was in some important respects a Rawlsian. Although Hayek said that the idea of social justice was nonsense, he argued against only a particular principle of social justice, one that Rawls too rejected, namely distribution according to individual merit. Any attempt to make reward and merit coincide, Hayek argued, would undermine the market's price system, leaving (...)
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  6.  14
    Andrew Lister (2013). Reciprocity, Relationships, and Distributive Justice. Social Theory and Practice 39 (1):70-94.
    This paper argues that the concern for distributive justice might be universal rather than contingent on a morally optional relationship, but limited in the demands it places upon us where a reasonable assurance of reciprocity is lacking. Principles of distributive justice apply wherever people are interacting, even if they have no choice but to interact, but are grounded in the goal of constituting relationships of mutual recognition as equals, and so partly conditional on compliance by others. On this view, there (...)
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  7.  67
    Andrew Lister (2011). Justice as Fairness and Reciprocity. Analyze and Kritik 33 (1):93-112.
    This paper tries to reconcile reciprocity with a fundamentally 'subject-centred' ethic by interpreting the reciprocity condition as a consequence of the fact that justice is in part a relational value. Duties of egalitarian distributive justice are not grounded on the duty to reciprocate benefits already received, but limited by a reasonable assurance of compliance on the part of those able to reciprocate, because their point is to constitute a valuable relationship, one of mutual recognition as equals. We have unconditional duty (...)
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  8.  7
    Andrew Lister (2015). Neutrality as a Basis for Minority Cultural Rights. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 10 (2):147-156.
    Andrew Lister | : This comment examines the idea of ‘neutrality of treatment’ that is at the heart of Alan Patten’s defense of minority cultural rights in Equal Recognition. The main issue I raise is whether neutrality of treatment can do without an ‘upstream’ or foundational commitment to neutrality of justification. | : Ce commentaire se penche sur le concept de « neutralité de traitement » au coeur de la défense des droits des minorités culturelles qu’offre Alan Patten dans son (...)
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  9.  20
    Andrew Lister (2008). Public Reason and Democracy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (3):273-289.
    Public reasoning is widely thought to be essential to democracy, but there is much disagreement about whether such deliberation should be constrained by a principle of public reason, which may seem to conflict with important democratic values. This paper denies that there is such a conflict, and argues that the distinctive contribution of public reason is to constitute a relationship of civic friendship in a diverse society. Acceptance of public reason would not work against mutual understanding, learning, or compromise, nor (...)
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  10.  1
    Andrew Lister (forthcoming). Fact-Sensitivity and the ‘Defining-Down’ Objection. Res Publica:1-19.
    This paper aims to clarify what it means for a normative theory to be fact-sensitive, and what might be wrong with such sensitivity, by examining the ways in which ‘justice as fairness’ depends upon facts. While much of the fact-sensitivity of Rawls’s principles consists of innocent limitations of generality, Rawls’s appeal to stability raises a legitimate worry about defining justice down in order to make ‘justice’ stable. If it should turn out that the correct principles of justice are inconsistent with (...)
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  11.  7
    Andrew Lister (2014). Public Reason and Perfectionism: Comments on Quong’s Liberalism Without Perfection. Filozofija I Društvo 25 (1):12-34.
    Liberalism Without Perfection elaborates a generally Rawlsian conception of public justification in order to defend antiperfectionist liberalism. This critical response raises questions about the link between the two parts of the project. On the hand, it is possible to reject that demand that reasons for political decisions pass a qualified acceptability requirement even if one is strictly opposed to paternalism. On the other hand, the commitment to public justifiability does not rule out all perfectionism, if there are some claims about (...)
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  12.  55
    Andrew D. Lister, Justice and Reciprocity.
    This paper addresses the question of when and why duties are conditional on compliance on the part of others, by examining the role of reciprocity in Rawls's theory of justice. In particular, it argues that the idea of reciprocity and the relational nature of distributive justice can help explain three otherwise puzzling aspects of Rawls's view: (1) his claim that justice has to be "congruent" with the good; (2) his claim that the justification of a political conception of justice depends (...)
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  13.  22
    Andrew Lister (2011). Public Justification of What? Coercion Vs. Decision as Competing Frames for the Basic Principle of Justificatory Liberalism. Public Affairs Quaterly 25 (4):349-367.
    Broadly speaking, the principle of public justifiability requires that the exercise of political power be justifiable to each and every person over whom that power is exercised. The idea of being justifiable to every person means being acceptable to any reasonable or otherwise qualified person , without such persons having to give up the comprehensive religious or philosophical doctrine they reasonably espouse. Public justifiability thus involves a partly idealized unanimity requirement, or as I will say, a criterion of multi-perspectival acceptability. (...)
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  14.  22
    Andrew Lister (2011). Democracy and Moral Conflict. Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):363-370.
    This paper is a review of Robert Talisse 's book "Democracy and Moral Conflict.".
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  15.  2
    Andrew Lister (2011). Justice as Fairness and Reciprocity. Analyse & Kritik 33 (1):93-112.
    This paper tries to reconcile reciprocity with a fundamentally 'subject-centred' ethic by interpreting the reciprocity condition as a consequence of the fact that justice is in part a relational value. Duties of egalitarian distributive justice are not grounded on the duty to reciprocate benefits already received, but limited by a reasonable assurance of compliance on the part of those able to reciprocate, because their point is to constitute a valuable relationship, one of mutual recognition as equals. We have unconditional duty (...)
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  16.  8
    Andrew Lister (2005). Hume and Rawls on the Circumstances and Priority of Justice. History of Political Thought 26 (4):664-695.
    This article addresses a historical puzzle that arises from Sandel's critique of Rawls's use of Hume's 'circumstances of justice', and a related philosophical puzzle about the priority of justice over other values. Sandel questioned whether a remedy for selfishness could be the first virtue. Yet, as Rawls understood, Hume's theory gave justice priority over other personal virtues, and was not incompatible with Rawls's claim that justice was the first virtue of institutions. Rawls was mistaken, however, to think that there was (...)
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  17.  3
    Andrew Lister (2010). McMahon, Christopher.Reasonable Disagreement: A Theory of Political Morality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. Pp. 212. $90.00. [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (1):214-218.
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  18. Andrew Lister (2005). Shaun P. Young, Ed., Political Liberalism: Variations on a Theme Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (2):148-151.
     
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  19. Andrew Lister (2010). Christopher McMahon, Reasonable Disagreement: A Theory of Political Morality. Ethics 121 (1):214.
     
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  20. Andrew Lister (2005). Shaun P. Young, Ed., Political Liberalism: Variations on a Theme. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 25:148-151.
     
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