Search results for 'Andrew M. Courtwright' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew M. Courtwright (2009). Justice, Stigma, and the New Epidemiology of Health Disparities. Bioethics 23 (2):90-96.score: 870.0
    Recent research in epidemiology has identified a number of factors beyond access to medical care that contribute to health disparities. Among the so-called socioeconomic determinants of health are income, education, and the distribution of social capital. One factor that has been overlooked in this discussion is the effect that stigmatization can have on health. In this paper, I identify two ways that social stigma can create health disparities: directly by impacting health-care seeking behaviour and indirectly through the internalization of negative (...)
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  2. Andrew M. Courtwright (2007). Justice, Health, and Status. Theoria 54 (112):1-24.score: 870.0
    Philosophical and political discussions of health inequalities have largely focused on questions of justice. The general strategy employed by philosophers like Norman Daniels is to identify a certain state of affairs—in his case, equality of opportunity—and then argue that health disparities limiting an individual's or group's access to that condition are unjust, demanding intervention. Recent work in epidemiology, however, has highlighted the importance of socioeconomic status in creating health inequalities. I explore the ways in which theories of justice have been (...)
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  3. Andrew Courtwright, Sharon Brackett, Alexandra Cist, M. Cornelia Cremens, Eric L. Krakauer & Ellen M. Robinson (2014). The Changing Composition of a Hospital Ethics Committee: A Tertiary Care Center's Experience. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 26 (1):59-68.score: 810.0
    A growing body of research has demonstrated significant heterogeneity of hospital ethics committee (HEC) size, membership and training requirements, length of appointment, institutional support, clinical and policy roles, and predictors of self identified success. Because these studies have focused on HECs at a single point in time, however, little is known about how the composition of HECs changes over time and what impact these changes have on committee utilization. The current study presents 20 years of data on the evolution of (...)
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  4. Andrew Courtwright (2013). Stigmatization and Public Health Ethics. Bioethics 27 (2):74-80.score: 240.0
    Encouraged by the success of smoking denormalization strategies as a tobacco-control measure, public health institutions are adopting a similar approach to other health behaviors. For example, a recent controversial ad campaign in New York explicitly aimed to denormalize HIV/AIDS amongst gay men. Authors such as Scott Burris have argued that efforts like this are tantamount to stigmatization and that such stigmatization is unethical because it is dehumanizing. Others have offered a limited endorsement of denormalization/stigmatization campaigns as being justified on consequentialist (...)
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  5. Andrew Courtwright (2008). The Social Determinants of Health: Moving Beyond Justice. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):16 – 17.score: 240.0
  6. Andrew Courtwright (2008). Health Disparities and Autonomy. Bioethics 22 (8):431-439.score: 240.0
    Disparities in socioeconomic status correlate closely with health, so that the lower a person's social position, the worse his health, an effect that the epidemiologist Michael Marmot has labeled the status syndrome. Marmot has argued that differences in autonomy, understood in terms of control, underlie the status syndrome. He has, therefore, recommended that the American medical profession champion policies that improve patient autonomy. In this paper, I clarify the kind of control Marmot sees as connecting differences in socioeconomic status to (...)
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  7. Andrew Courtwright (2011). Shared Health Governance and the Problem of Stability. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (7):47 - 49.score: 240.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 7, Page 47-49, July 2011.
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  8. Andrew Courtwright (2012). Who Is “Too Sick to Benefit”? Hastings Center Report 42 (4):41-47.score: 240.0
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  9. Andrew Courtwright (forthcoming). Benjamin E. Berkman is a Faculty. Hastings Center Report.score: 240.0
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  10. Anne Barnhill, Nikola Biller-Andorno, Verina Wild, Larry Carbone, Sonya Charles, Andrew Courtwright & Christy L. Cummings (2012). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 42 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2012. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 42 (2012) and May Be Purchased From Wiley-Blackwell; E-Mail: Cs-Journals@ Wiley. Com. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 42.score: 240.0
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  11. Andrew Courtwright (2013). From Unregulated Practice to Credentialed Profession: Implementing Ethics Consultation Competencies. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (2):16-17.score: 240.0
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