Search results for 'Andrew McCarthy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew McCarthy & Ian Phillips (2006). No New Argument Against the Existence Requirement. Analysis 66 (289):39–44.score: 240.0
    Yagisawa (2005) considers two old arguments against the existence requirement. Both arguments are significantly less appealing than Yagisawa suggests. In particular, the second argument, first given by Kaplan (1989: 498), simply assumes that existence is contingent (§1). Yagisawa’s ‘new’ argument shares this weakness. It also faces a dilemma. Yagisawa must either treat ‘at @’ as a sentential operator occupying the same grammatical position as ‘∼’ or as supplying an extra argument place. In the former case, Yagisawa’s argument faces precisely the (...)
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  2. María Herrera Lima & Thomas McCarthy (1993). Crítica de la Razón Impura: Entrevista Con Thomas McCarthy. Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 2:147-155.score: 180.0
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  3. Lance McCarthy (2007). Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia Author's Email: Lance. McCarthy@ Flinders. Edu. Au. Apeiron 14 (4):481.score: 180.0
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  4. Wolfram Hinzen (2003). Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy,Origins of Complex Language. An Inquiry Into the Evolutionary Beginnings of Sentences, Syllables, and Truth. Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (6):765-780.score: 120.0
  5. Wolfram Hinzen (2003). Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy. Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (6):765-780.score: 120.0
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  6. Timothy McCarthy (2002). Radical Interpretation and Indeterminacy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    McCarthy develops a theory of radical interpretation--the project of characterizing from scratch the language and attitudes of an agent or population--and applies it to the problems of indeterminacy of interpretation first described by Quine. The major theme in McCarthy's study is that a relatively modest set of interpretive principles, properly applied, can serve to resolve the major indeterminacies of interpretation.
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  7. John McCarthy, Human-Level Ai Is Harder Than It Seemed.score: 60.0
    • alpha-beta pruning characterizes human play, but it ticed by early chess programmers—Turing, Shannon, Ulam, and Bernstein. We humans are not very good ing the heuristics we ourselves use. Approximations to used by Samuel, Newell and Simon, McCarthy. Proved lent to minimax by Hart and Levine, independently Knuth gives details.
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  8. Dudley Andrew (1984). Concepts in Film Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Concepts in Film Theory is a continuation of Dudley Andrew's classic, The Major Film Theories. In writing now about contemporary theory, Andrew focuses on the key concepts in film study -- perception, representation, signification, narrative structure, adaptation, evaluation, identification, figuration, and interpretation. Beginning with an introductory chapter on the current state of film theory, Andrew goes on to build an overall view of film, presenting his own ideas on each concept, and giving a sense of the interdependence (...)
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  9. John McCarthy, Human-Type Common Sense Needs Extensions to Logic.score: 60.0
    John McCarthy, Stanford University Logical AI (artificial intelligence) is based on programs that represent facts about the world in languages of mathematical logic and decide what actions will achieve goals by logical reasoning. A lot has been accomplished with logic as is.
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  10. John McCarthy, From Here to Human-Level Intelligence.score: 60.0
    This article is the basis of an invited talk at KR-96 in 1996 November. It has been modified from the version that appeared in the preprints of that meeting. There is an html version , a .dvi version , .pdf version and a .ps version. Up to: Main McCarthy page Up to: Send comments to mccarthy@stanford.edu. I sometimes make changes suggested in them. - John McCarthy..
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  11. John McCarthy (1995). Todd Moody's Zombies. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):345-347.score: 30.0
    From the AI point of view, consciousness must be regarded as a collection of interacting processes rather than the unitary object of much philosophical speculation. We ask what kinds of propositions and other entities need to be designed for consciousness to be useful to an animal or a machine. We thereby assert that human consciousness is useful to human functioning and not just and epiphenomenon. Zombies in the sense of Todd Moody's article are merely the victims of Moody's prejudices. To (...)
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  12. Andrew Sabl (2002). Ruling Passions: Political Offices and Democratic Ethics. Princeton University Press.score: 30.0
    How should politicians act? When should they try to lead public opinion and when should they follow it? Should politicians see themselves as experts, whose opinions have greater authority than other people's, or as participants in a common dialogue with ordinary citizens? When do virtues like toleration and willingness to compromise deteriorate into moral weakness? In this innovative work, Andrew Sabl answers these questions by exploring what a democratic polity needs from its leaders. He concludes that there are systematic, (...)
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  13. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (2003). What Proper Names, and Their Absence, Do Not Demonstrate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):288-289.score: 24.0
    Hurford claims that empty variables antedated proper names in linguistic (not merely logical) predicate-argument structure, and this had an effect on visual perception. But his evidence, drawn from proper names and the supposed inability of nonhumans to recognise individual conspecifics, is weak. So visual perception seems less relevant to the evolution of grammar than Hurford thinks.
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  14. Barbara Partee, Do We Need Two Basic Types?score: 24.0
    In a provocative book (Carstairs-McCarthy 1999), Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy argues that the apparently universal distinction in human languages between sentences and noun phrases cannot be assumed to be inevitable for languages with the expressive power of human languages, but needs explaining. His work suggests, but does not explicitly state, that there is also no conceptual necessity for the distinction between basic types e and t, a distinction argued for by Frege and carried into formal semantics through (...)
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  15. W. Noble (2002). The Origins of Complex Language. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2):249 – 250.score: 24.0
    Book Information The origins of complex language. By Carstairs-McCarthy Andrew. Oxford University Press. Oxford. 1999. Pp. vi + 260.
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  16. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (2000). Broca's Area and Language Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):28-29.score: 24.0
    Grodzinsky associates Broca's area with three kinds of deficit, relating to articulation, comprehension (involving trace deletion), and production (involving “tree pruning”). Could these be special cases of one deficit? Evidence from research on language evolution suggests that they may all involve syllable structure or those aspects of syntax that evolved through exploiting the neural mechanisms underlying syllable structure.
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  17. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (2003). A Shrug is Not a Sentence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):215-215.score: 24.0
    Corballis's claim that the origin of syntax lies in solely gesture is contested. His scenario does not explain why constraints on syntactic “movement” are apparently part of the human biological endowment for language. It also does not pay enough attention to the internal structure of sentences, and how they contrast with other linguistic units such as noun phrases.
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  18. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (1999). Explicitness and Predication: A Risky Linkage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):762-763.score: 24.0
  19. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (1999). The Tension Between “Combinatorial” and “Class-Default” Regularity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1017-1018.score: 24.0
    Clahsen shows that “combinatorial” inflection is processed differently from “irregular” inflection. However, combinatorially regular affixes need not coincide with “class-default” affixes, that is, affixes shared by more than one inflection class and all of whose rivals are peculiar to one class. This creates a tension that may help to explain the persistence of inflection class systems.
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  20. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (1994). Inflection Classes, Gender, and the Principle of Contrast. In Stephen Everson (ed.), Language. Cambridge University Press. 737--788.score: 24.0
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  21. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (1998). The Frame/Content Model and Syntactic Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):515-516.score: 24.0
    The frame/content theory suggests that chewing was tinkered into speaking. A simple extrapolation of this approach suggests that syllable structure may have been tinkered into syntax. That would explain the widely noted parallels between sentence structure and syllable structure, and also the otherwise mysterious pervasiveness of the grammatical distinction between sentences and noun phrases.
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  22. Rosanna Castorina (forthcoming). The Sense of the Ending and Human Finitude. Representation of Catastrophe in Cormac McCarthy's “The Road”. Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.score: 24.0
    This paper, starting from the awareness of the anthropological finitude, aims to investigate the symbolic meaning of the catastrophe in today's society. With reference to E. De Martino’s and G. Anders’s anthropo - philosophical theses, the paper analyzes the representation of present catastrophes as Apocalypses without eskaton , in which the "blindness" of man and his inability to react is manifested. Both technological catastrophes directly caused by man and environmental disasters indirectly produced by anthropic neglect causes a widespread sense of (...)
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  23. David Saunders & Ian Hunter (2003). Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke's Translation of Samuel Pufendorf's 'De Officio Hominis Et Civis'. History of Political Thought 24 (2):218-234.score: 24.0
    Andrew Tooke's 1691 English translation of Samuel Pufendorf's De officio hominis et civis, published as The Whole Duty of Man According to the Law of Nature, brought Pufendorf's manual fo statist natural law into English politics at a moment of temporary equilibrium in the unfinished contest between Crown and Parliament for the rights and powers of sovereignty. Drawing on the authors' re-edition of The Whole Duty of Man, this article describes and analyses a telling instance of how--by translation--the core (...)
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  24. Andrew Collier, Margaret Scotford Archer & William Outhwaite (eds.) (2004). Defending Objectivity: Essays in Honour of Andrew Collier. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Andrew Collier is the boldest defender of objectivity - in science, knowledge, thought, action, politics, morality and religion. In this tribute and acknowledgement of the influence his work has had on a wide readership, his colleagues show that they have been stimulated by his thinking and offer challenging responses. This wide-ranging book covers key areas with which defenders of objectivity often have to engage. Sections are devoted to the following: 'objectivity of value', 'objectivity and everyday knowledge', 'objectivity in political (...)
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  25. Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, David Ingram, Sally Wyatt, Yoko Arisaka & Andrew Feenberg (2011). Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):203-226.score: 21.0
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg’s Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity Content Type Journal Article Pages 203-226 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0017-8 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA David B. Ingram, Loyola University Chicago, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626, USA Sally Wyatt, e-Humanities Group, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) & Maastricht University, Cruquiusweg 31, 1019 AT Amsterdam, The Netherlands Yoko Arisaka, Forschungsinstitut für Philosophie (...)
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  26. Thomas Jeannot (2010). Reclaiming Marx's 'Capital': A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency, Andrew Kliman, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2007. Historical Materialism 18 (4):189-206.score: 21.0
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  27. Andrew Botterell (2005). Review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 114:125-128.score: 21.0
    A review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto: Thoroughly Modern Materialism (Cambridge University Press, 2003).
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  28. William O. Stephens (2011). If Friendship Hurts, an Epicurean Deserts : A Reply to Andrew Mitchell. In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi. 7.score: 18.0
    In “Friendship Amongst the Self-Sufficient: Epicurus” (this Journal, Vol. 2, No. 2, June 2001), Andrew Mitchell explores the Epicurean view of the relationship between self-sufficiency and friendship by contrasting it with the views of Aristotle and the Stoics. Epicurus, Aristotle, and the Stoics do indeed have interestingly different views on friendship that are well worth comparing. Yet Mitchell’s characterization of Aristotelian friendship is misleading, his account of Stoic friendship is inaccurate, and his interpretation of Epicurean friendship is curiously imaginative (...)
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  29. Gideon Calder & Andrew Collier (2009). Values and Ontology: An Interview with Andrew Collier, Part. Journal of Critical Realism 8 (1):63-90.score: 18.0
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  30. Douglas Kellner, Review-Article on Andrew Feenberg, Questioning Technology. New York and London, Routledge, 1999.score: 18.0
    Andrew Feenberg's Questioning Technology (1999) is his third book in a series of studies which undertake to provide critical theoretical and democratic political perspectives to engage technology in the contemporary era. In Critical Theory of Technology (1991), Feenberg draws on neo-Marxian and other critical theories of technology, especially the Frankfurt School, to criticize determinist and essentialist theories. In this ground-breaking work (which will go into its second edition in 2001), he discusses both how the labor process, science, and technology (...)
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  31. Andrew Collier & Gideon Calder (2008). Philosophy and Politics: An Interview with Andrew Collier, Part. Journal of Critical Realism 7 (2):276-296.score: 18.0
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  32. Wayne C. Myrvold (1996). Bayesianism and Diverse Evidence: A Reply to Andrew Wayne. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):661-665.score: 18.0
    Andrew Wayne (1995) discusses some recent attempts to account, within a Bayesian framework, for the "common methodological adage" that "diverse evidence better confirms a hypothesis than does the same amount of similar evidence" (112). One of the approaches considered by Wayne is that suggested by Howson and Urbach (1989/1993) and dubbed the "correlation approach" by Wayne. This approach is, indeed, incomplete, in that it neglects the role of the hypothesis under consideration in determining what diversity in a body of (...)
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  33. Benjamin Barber (2013). Expositions of Sacrificial Logic: Girard, Žižek, and Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men. Contagion 20 (1):163-179.score: 18.0
    Cormac McCarthy’s No Country for Old Men, and Joel and Ethan Coen’s film adaptation of the same name, deliver two separate critiques of sacrificial violence through their particular renderings of Carla Jean Moss’s death scene, as they correspond, respectively, to the theories of René Girard and Slavoj Žižek. In both film and novel, the chase narrative offers a concrete representation of runaway acquisitive mimesis engendering resentment and cathartic violence. This violence is symbolically manifest in the character of Anton Chigurh. (...)
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  34. Cynthia Willett (2010). Response to Bill Martin and Andrew Cutrofello on Irony in the Age of Empire. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (1):96-99.score: 18.0
    What a pleasure to have such subtle thinkers and scholars as Bill Martin and Andrew Cutrofello reflect on the relation of irony and comedy to politics and philosophy through their commentary on my new book. To set the tone, Martin begins with a koan, or a parody of one, “What if a tree told a joke in the woods and there was no one there to hear it?” He means, I believe, to sound a warning on the limits of (...)
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  35. Nicolas de Warren (2007). Off the Beaten Path: The Artworks of Andrew Goldsworthy. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1-2):29-48.score: 18.0
    This essay explores Heidegger’s “The Origin of the Work of Art” and Andrew Goldsworthy’s artworks. Both Heidegger and Goldsworthy can be seen as refashioning our ontological bearings towards nature through the work of art. After introducing a set of distinctions (e.g., world/earth) in the context of Heidegger’s conception of the artwork as the event of truth, I argue that Heidegger’s releasing of the work of art from metaphysical notions of “the thing” illuminates the ambiguous status of Goldsworthy’s artworks as (...)
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  36. Varol Akman (1995). Book Review -- Vladimir Lifschitz, Ed., Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy. [REVIEW] Philosophical Explorations.score: 18.0
    This is a review of Formalizing Common Sense: Papers by John McCarthy, ed. by Vladimir Lifschitz, published by Ablex Publishing Corp. in 1990.
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  37. Mikel Burley (2013). Andrew Gleeson, A Frightening Love: Recasting the Problem of Evil (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012). Philosophical Papers 42 (1):127 - 131.score: 18.0
    (2013). Andrew Gleeson, A Frightening Love: Recasting the Problem of Evil (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012) Philosophical Papers: Vol. 42, No. 1, pp. 127-131. doi: 10.1080/05568641.2013.774726.
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  38. Vida Pavesich (2011). The Anthropology of Hope and the Philosophy of History: Rethinking Kant's Third and Fourth Questions with Blumenberg and McCarthy. Thesis Eleven 104 (1):20-39.score: 18.0
    In order to address the question of hope in the present, it behooves us to revisit Kant’s third and fourth questions: ‘What may we hope?’ and ‘What is the human being?’ I reexamine these questions through an analysis of Thomas McCarthy’s recent book Race, Empire, and the Idea of Human Development and several works by Hans Blumenberg. I agree with McCarthy that Kant’s anthropology is incomplete and that the postmodern rejection of macronarratives was premature, but I claim that (...)
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  39. Andrew J. Reck (1958). The Philosophy of Andrew Ushenko: II. Review of Metaphysics 11 (4):673 - 688.score: 18.0
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  40. J. Andrew DeWoody, John W. Bickham, Charles H. Michler, Krista M. Nichols, Olin E. Rhodes & Keith E. Woeste (2011). Conservation Genetics for Natural ResourcesMolecular Approaches in Natural Resource Conservation and Management.J. Andrew DeWoody , John W. Bickham , Charles H. Michler , Krista M. Nichols , Olin E. Rhodes Jr. , and Keith E. Woeste , Eds . Cambridge University Press , 2010 . 392 Pp., Illus. $55.00 (ISBN 9780521731348 Paper). [REVIEW] BioScience 61 (4):330-331.score: 18.0
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  41. Gregory Flaxman (2001). The Laws of Cinematic Hospitality: A Response to Andrew Murphie. Film-Philosophy 5 (2).score: 18.0
    Andrew Murphie 'Is Philosophy Ever Enough?' _Film-Philosophy_, Deleuze Special Issue vol. 5 no. 38, November 2001.
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  42. Andrew J. Reck (1958). The Philosophy of Andrew Ushenko: I. Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):471 - 485.score: 18.0
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  43. Andrew Dodsworth (2000). Andrew's Literary Death Quiz. Philosophy Now 27:47-47.score: 18.0
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  44. Jan A. Bergstra & Alban Ponse (1998). Bochvar-McCarthy Logic and Process Algebra. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 39 (4):464-484.score: 18.0
    We propose a combination of Bochvar's strict three-valued logic, McCarthy's sequential three-valued logic, and process algebra via the conditional guard construct. This combination entails the introduction of a new constant meaningless in process algebra. We present an operational semantics in SOS-style, and a completeness result for ACP with conditional guard construct and the proposed logic.
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  45. S. Courtois (2004). Habermas's Epistemic Conception of Democracy: Some Reactions to McCarthy's Objections. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (7):842-866.score: 18.0
    The article aims at assessing the strengths and weaknesses of the objections to Habermas’s epistemic conception of democracy raised by Thomas McCarthy in some of his essays. The author defends two ideas. First, he contends that McCarthy is mistaken in believing that democratic debates would not be a matter of consensus. In this regard, two arguments are raised, showing that the search for agreement and consensus by citizens in public forums can hardly be dismissed and that consensus can (...)
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  46. Adam Stewart (2010). John Henry Newman and Andrew Martin Fairbairn. Newman Studies Journal 7 (2):6-17.score: 18.0
    This essay examines the contrasting conceptualizations of reason in the thought of John Henry Newman and Andrew Martin Fairbairn in their articles published in The Contemporary Review in 1885. This essay articulates both Fairbairn’s charge of philosophical scepticism against Newman as well as Newman’s defense of his position and concomitantly details Fairbairn’s and Newman’s competing notions of the efficacy of reason to provide reliable knowledge of God. The positions of Fairbairn and Newman remain two of the most important perspectives (...)
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  47. Doohwan Ahn (2011). From Greece to Babylon:The Political Thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686–1743). History of European Ideas 37 (4):421-437.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay with particular reference to his highly acclaimed book called A New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus (1727). Dedicated to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, to whom he was tutor, this work has been hitherto viewed as a Jacobite imitation of the Telemachus, Son of Ulysses(1699) of his eminent teacher archbishop Fénelon of Cambrai. By tracing the dual legacy of the first Persian Emperor Cyrus in Western thought, (...)
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  48. John Andrew Fisher (1996). The Myth of Anthropomorphism John Andrew Fisher. In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. Mit Press.score: 18.0
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  49. William Hasker (2010). Which God? What Power? A Response to Andrew H. Gleeson. Sophia 49 (3):433-445.score: 18.0
    Andrew H. Gleeson has written an essay commenting on an exchange between Dewi Z. Phillips and me, arguing that I was mistaken to dismiss Phillips’ criticism of the standard definition of omnipotence as unsuccessful. Furthermore, he charges Swinburne, me, and analytic theists in general, with an excessive anthropomorphism that obliterates the distinction between Creator and creature. In response, I contend that all of Gleeson’s criticisms are unsound.
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  50. John Apczynski (2008). Andrew Grosso on Polanyi as a Resource for Christian Theology. Tradition and Discovery 35 (1):46-48.score: 18.0
    These reflections on Andrew Grosso’s recent book Personal Being highlight his philosophical construction of a concept of personhood based on themes from the writings Of Michael Polanyi and his use of this conception to express creatively elements of the traditional Christian doctrines on the trinity. Additional clarifications are sought regarding his formulations on the divine personhood of Jesus, the adequacy of his formulations on the intra-trinitarian relations, and the insightfulness of the absolute personhood of the divine. This study is (...)
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