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  1. Andrew McGee (2014). Acting to Let Someone Die. Bioethics 28 (8).
    This paper examines the recent prominent view in medical ethics that withdrawing life-sustaining treatment (LST) is an act of killing. I trace this view to the rejection of the traditional claim that withdrawing LST is an omission rather than an act. Although that traditional claim is not as problematic as this recent prominent view suggests, my main claim is that even if we accepted that withdrawing LST should be classified as an act rather than as an omission, it could still (...)
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  2. Andrew Mcgee (2013). Intention, Foresight, and Ending Life. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (01):77-85.
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  3. Andrew McGee (2011). Me and My Body: The Relevance of the Distinction for the Difference Between Withdrawing Life Support and Euthanasia. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (4):671-677.
    In this paper, I discuss David Shaw's claim that the body of a terminally ill person can be conceived as a kind of life support, akin to an artificial ventilator. I claim that this position rests upon an untenable dualism between the mind and the body. Given that dualism continues to be attractive to some thinkers, I attempt to diagnose the reasons why it continues to be attractive, as well as to demonstrate its incoherence, drawing on some recent work in (...)
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  4. Andrew McGee (2011). Omissions, Causation, and Responsibility. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):351-361.
    In this paper I discuss a recent exchange of articles between Hugh McLachlan and John Coggon on the relationship between omissions, causation, and moral responsibility. My aim is to contribute to their debate by isolating a presupposition I believe they both share and by questioning that presupposition. The presupposition is that, at any given moment, there are countless things that I am omitting to do. This leads both McLachlan and Coggon to give a distorted account of the relationship between causation (...)
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