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Profile: Andrew McGonigal (University of Leeds)
  1. Andrew McGonigal, Davidson, Metaphor and Error Theory.
    Davidson’s error theory about metaphorical meaning has rightly commanded a lot of critical attention over the last twenty five or so years. Each component of that theory – the case for antirealism about metaphorical meanings, the diagnosis of the mistakes that led theorists to falsely ascribe such semantic properties to words and sentences, the suggested functional replacement of such talk in terms of the effects that metaphorical utterances bring about – has been examined, reformulated and criticised. The evaluation of the (...)
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  2. Andrew McGonigal (2013). Truth, Relativism, and Serial Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):165-179.
    This paper presents a novel explanandum for a theory of fictional truth. I explore a range of theoretical treatments of the data, and argue that it motivates the adoption of a distinctive style of relativism about truth-in-fiction.
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  3. Andrew Mcgonigal (2011). Philosophical Perspectives on Art by Davies, Stephen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):231-233.
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  4. Andrew McGonigal (2010). Art, Value and Character. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):545 - 566.
    Some artworks manifest moral attitudes. I clarify and defend an argument to the effect that these works can be aesthetically better merely because morally good people skilfully produced them.
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  5. Andrew McGonigal (2010). Garry L. Hagberg, Ed., Art and Ethical Criticism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 119 (3):394-398.
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  6. John Hawthorne & Andrew McGonigal (2008). The Many Minds Account of Vagueness. Philosophical Studies 138 (3):435 - 440.
    This paper presents an new epistemicist account of vagueness, one that avoids standard arbitrariness worries by exploiting a plenitudinous metaphysic.
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  7. Andrew McGonigal (2006). The Autonomy of Aesthetic Judgement. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (4):331-348.
    In recent work, Robert Hopkins has argued that aesthetic judgements are autonomous. When a subject finds herself diverging in judgement from a group of others who, while independently applying the same method, have come to some opposing conclusion, then for ordinary empirical matters this is often reason enough for her to suspend judgement, or even to adopt their view, but this happens much more rarely in the case of beauty. Moreover, the opposing view does not act as a defeater to (...)
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  8. Andrew McGonigal (2005). Moral Facts and Suitably Informed Subjects: A Reply to Denham. Ratio 18 (1):82–92.
    The nature of moral facts, and their relationship to rationality, imagination and sentiment, have been central and pressing issues in recent moral philosophy. In this paper, I discuss and criticise a meta-ethical theory put forward by Alison Denham, which views moral facts as being constituted by the responses of ideal, empathetic agents. I argue that Denham’s account is radically unstable, in that she has given us an account of the nature of such agents which is inconsistent with an independently plausible (...)
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  9. Andrew McGonigal (2003). Traditional Epistemology Reconsidered A Reply to Eflin. Metaphilosophy 34 (1-2):69-77.
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  10. Andrew McGonigal (2002). Metaphor, Indeterminacy, and Intention. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (2):179-190.
    David Cooper has argued that any acceptable theory of metaphor should account for ‘indeterminacy’: the sense that many metaphors admit of multiple acceptable interpretations, none of which can be uniquely demonstrated to be correct. He further argues that the ‘speaker's meaning’ model of metaphorical content cannot meet this constraint and, thus, should be rejected. In this paper I argue that Cooper's characterization of the proposed constraint is imprecise as stated and give my own characterization of the problem. There is a (...)
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