Search results for 'Andrew Mumford' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  25
    Meagan E. Brock, Andrew Vert, Vykinta Kligyte, Ethan P. Waples, Sydney T. Sevier & Michael D. Mumford (2008). Mental Models: An Alternative Evaluation of a Sensemaking Approach to Ethics Instruction. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3):449-472.
    In spite of the wide variety of approaches to ethics training it is still debatable which approach has the highest potential to enhance professionals’ integrity. The current effort assesses a novel curriculum that focuses on metacognitive reasoning strategies researchers use when making sense of day-to-day professional practices that have ethical implications. The evaluated trainings effectiveness was assessed by examining five key sensemaking processes, such as framing, emotion regulation, forecasting, self-reflection, and information integration that experts and novices apply in ethical decision-making. (...)
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  2.  15
    Andrew Mumford (2012). Minimum Force Meets Brutality: Detention, Interrogation and Torture in British Counter-Insurgency Campaigns. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (1):10-25.
    Abstract This paper explores brutality and torture in the history of British counter-insurgency campaigns. Taking as a pretext the British government's announcement in January 2012 to scrap a judicial review into the rendition and torture of UK citizens at Guantanamo Bay by American intelligence operatives with the complicity of British intelligence agencies, the paper posits that the actions this review was supposed to evaluate are not restricted to counter-terrorism. By examining the historical usage of interrogation methods by the British in (...)
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  3.  3
    Michael D. Royster (forthcoming). Proxy Warfare: War and Conflict in the Modern World by Andrew Mumford. Human Rights Review.
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  4.  4
    Letícia Lenzi (2016). Lewis Mumford: Uma voz de resistência à civilização tecnocrática. Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 6 (12):25-36.
    A fé absoluta na capacidade da tecnologia em promover melhorias sociais sofreu fortes críticas no último século. O escritor norte-americano Lewis Mumford denunciou este mito e seus prejuízos, estabelecendo-se como uma voz de reação contra os valores impostos pela sociedade industrial tecnocrática. Embora Mumford tenha destacado as denúncias sobre o poder desmedido da esfera tecnológica da vida moderna, e as razões históricas que nos legou essa cultura, suas teses sugerem um otimismo frente à possibilidade de controlarmos e reorientarmos (...)
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  5. Sharon R. Ford, Objects and Discreteness in Mumford’s Realist Lawlessness.
    In this paper, I argue that Mumford's Realist Lawlessness account of powers leads to ontological Holism. Consequently, this calls for a deflated conception of haecceity, intrinsicality and discreteness.
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  6.  28
    Ullin T. Place (1999). Intentionality and the Physical: A Reply to Mumford. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (195):225-30.
    Martin and Pfeifer claim ‘that the most typical characterizations of intentionality’ proposed by philosophers are satisfied by physical dispositions. If that is correct, we must conclude either, as they do and as Mumford (this volume) does, that the philosophers are wrong and intentionality is something else or, as I do, that intentionality is what the philosophers say it is, in which case it is the mark, not of the mental, but of the dispositional; the intentionality of a disposition consists (...)
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  7.  7
    David Saunders & Ian Hunter (2003). Bringing the State to England: Andrew Tooke's Translation of Samuel Pufendorf's 'De Officio Hominis Et Civis'. History of Political Thought 24 (2):218-234.
    Andrew Tooke's 1691 English translation of Samuel Pufendorf's De officio hominis et civis, published as The Whole Duty of Man According to the Law of Nature, brought Pufendorf's manual fo statist natural law into English politics at a moment of temporary equilibrium in the unfinished contest between Crown and Parliament for the rights and powers of sovereignty. Drawing on the authors' re-edition of The Whole Duty of Man, this article describes and analyses a telling instance of how--by translation--the core (...)
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  8.  8
    E. Brock Meagan, Vykinta Kligyte Andrew Vert, P. Waples Ethan, T. Sevier Sydney & D. Mumford Michael (2008). Mental Models: An Alternative Evaluation of a Sensemaking Approach to Ethics Instruction. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (3).
    In spite of the wide variety of approaches to ethics training it is still debatable which approach has the highest potential to enhance professionals’ integrity. The current effort assesses a novel curriculum that focuses on metacognitive reasoning strategies researchers use when making sense of day-to-day professional practices that have ethical implications. The evaluated trainings effectiveness was assessed by examining five key sensemaking processes, such as framing, emotion regulation, forecasting, self-reflection, and information integration that experts and novices apply in ethical decision-making. (...)
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  9. Andrew Lang & Marysa Demoor (1989). Friends Over the Ocean Andrew Lang's American Correspondents 1881-1912. Rijksuniversiteit Te Gent.
     
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  10.  38
    Andrew Botterell (2005). Review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 114:125-128.
    A review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto: Thoroughly Modern Materialism (Cambridge University Press, 2003).
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  11. Andrew Ashworth & Martin Wasik (eds.) (1998). Fundamentals of Sentencing Theory: Essays in Honour of Andrew von Hirsch. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Oxford Monographs On Criminal Law And Justice series aims to cover all aspects of criminal law and procedure including criminal evidence. the scope of the series is wide, encompassing both practical and theoretical works. Series Editor: Professor Andrew Ashworth, Vinerian Professor of English Law, All Souls College, Oxford. This volume is a thematic collection of essays on sentencing theory by leading writers. The essays fall into three groups. Part I considers the underlying justifications for the imposition of punishment (...)
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  12.  14
    Thomas Jeannot (2010). Reclaiming Marx's 'Capital': A Refutation of the Myth of Inconsistency, Andrew Kliman, Lanham: Lexington Books, 2007. Historical Materialism 18 (4):189-206.
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  13.  12
    Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, David Ingram, Sally Wyatt, Yoko Arisaka & Andrew Feenberg (2011). Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg's Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity. Philosophy and Technology 24 (2):203-226.
    Book Symposium on Andrew Feenberg’s Between Reason and Experience: Essays in Technology and Modernity Content Type Journal Article Pages 203-226 DOI 10.1007/s13347-011-0017-8 Authors Inmaculada de Melo-Martín, Division of Medical Ethics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA David B. Ingram, Loyola University Chicago, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL 60626, USA Sally Wyatt, e-Humanities Group, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) & Maastricht University, Cruquiusweg 31, 1019 AT Amsterdam, The Netherlands Yoko Arisaka, Forschungsinstitut für Philosophie (...)
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  14.  5
    Andrew Mansfield (2012). Aristocratic Reform and the Extirpation of Parliament in Early Georgian Britain: Andrew Michael Ramsay and French Ideas of Monarchy. History of European Ideas 40 (2):1-19.
    In An Essay upon Civil Government , Andrew Michael Ramsay mounted a sustained attack upon the development throughout English history of popular government. According to Ramsay, popular involvement in sovereignty had led to the decline of society and the revolutions of the seventeenth century. In his own time, Parliament had become a despotic instrument of government, riven with faction and driven by a multiplicity of laws that manifested a widespread corruption in the state. Ramsay's solution to this degeneracy was (...)
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  15.  45
    Andrew Collier, Margaret Scotford Archer & William Outhwaite (eds.) (2004). Defending Objectivity: Essays in Honour of Andrew Collier. Routledge.
    Andrew Collier is the boldest defender of objectivity - in science, knowledge, thought, action, politics, morality and religion. In this tribute and acknowledgement of the influence his work has had on a wide readership, his colleagues show that they have been stimulated by his thinking and offer challenging responses. This wide-ranging book covers key areas with which defenders of objectivity often have to engage. Sections are devoted to the following: 'objectivity of value', 'objectivity and everyday knowledge', 'objectivity in political (...)
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  16. W. H. Evans (1924). Twelve Lectures on the Harmonial Philosophy of Andrew Jackson Davis. Spiritualists' National Union.
     
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  17. John Hawthorne & David Manley (2005). Review of Stephen Mumford's Dispositions. [REVIEW] Noûs 39:179-95.
    In Mumford’s Dispositions, the reader will find an extended treatment of the recent debate about dispositions from Ryle and Geach to the present. Along the way, Mumford presents his own views on several key points, though we found the book much more thorough in its assessment of opposing views than in the development of a positive account. As we’ll try to make clear, some of the ideas endorsed in Dispositions are certainly worth pursuing; others are not. Following Mackie, (...)
     
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  18. John Andrew Fisher (1996). The Myth of Anthropomorphism John Andrew Fisher. In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press
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  19. Geoff Gallop (1983). Reviews : Andrew Gamble, Britain in Decline (Macmillan, 1981) and Martin Jacques and Francis Mulhern (Eds), The Forward March of Labour Halted? (Verso, 1981). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 7 (1):185-188.
    Andrew Gamble, Britain in Decline and Martin Jacques and Francis Mulhern , The Forward March of Labour Halted?
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  20. E. J. Lowe (2012). Mumford and Anjum on Causal Necessitarianism and Antecedent Strengthening. Analysis 72 (4):731-735.
    Stephen Mumford and Rani Lill Anjum have recently attacked causal necessitarianism – the doctrine that causes necessitate their effects – on the grounds that causation does not survive what they describe as the test of antecedent strengthening. This article shows that there are credible conditional logics which do not sanction this test, thereby providing an escape route for proponents of causal necessitarianism from Mumford and Anjum's argument.
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  21. Luke Glynn (2012). Getting Causes From Powers, by Stephen Mumford and Rani Lill Anjum. [REVIEW] Mind 121 (484):1099-1106.
    In this book, Mumford and Anjum advance a theory of causation based on a metaphysics of powers. The book is for the most part lucidly written, and contains some interesting contributions: in particular on the necessary connection between cause and effect and on the perceivability of the causal relation. I do, however, have reservations about some of the book’s central theses: in particular, that cause and effect are simultaneous, and that causes can fruitfully be represented as vectors.
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  22.  23
    Wayne C. Myrvold (1996). Bayesianism and Diverse Evidence: A Reply to Andrew Wayne. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):661-665.
    Andrew Wayne discusses some recent attempts to account, within a Bayesian framework, for the "common methodological adage" that "diverse evidence better confirms a hypothesis than does the same amount of similar evidence". One of the approaches considered by Wayne is that suggested by Howson and Urbach and dubbed the "correlation approach" by Wayne. This approach is, indeed, incomplete, in that it neglects the role of the hypothesis under consideration in determining what diversity in a body of evidence is relevant (...)
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  23.  4
    Andrew Cullison (2010). A Defence of the No-Minimum Response to the Problem of Evil: Andrew Cullison. Religious Studies 47 (1):121-123.
    I defend Peter van Inwagen's no-minimum response to the problem of evil from a recent objection raised by Jeff Jordan.
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  24. Douglas Kellner, Review-Article on Andrew Feenberg, Questioning Technology. New York and London, Routledge, 1999.
    Andrew Feenberg's Questioning Technology (1999) is his third book in a series of studies which undertake to provide critical theoretical and democratic political perspectives to engage technology in the contemporary era. In Critical Theory of Technology (1991), Feenberg draws on neo-Marxian and other critical theories of technology, especially the Frankfurt School, to criticize determinist and essentialist theories. In this ground-breaking work (which will go into its second edition in 2001), he discusses both how the labor process, science, and technology (...)
     
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  25.  63
    John Apczynski (2008). Andrew Grosso on Polanyi as a Resource for Christian Theology. Tradition and Discovery 35 (1):46-48.
    These reflections on Andrew Grosso’s recent book Personal Being highlight his philosophical construction of a concept of personhood based on themes from the writings Of Michael Polanyi and his use of this conception to express creatively elements of the traditional Christian doctrines on the trinity. Additional clarifications are sought regarding his formulations on the divine personhood of Jesus, the adequacy of his formulations on the intra-trinitarian relations, and the insightfulness of the absolute personhood of the divine. This study is (...)
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  26.  6
    William Hasker (2010). Which God? What Power? A Response to Andrew H. Gleeson. Sophia 49 (3):433-445.
    Andrew H. Gleeson has written an essay commenting on an exchange between Dewi Z. Phillips and me, arguing that I was mistaken to dismiss Phillips’ criticism of the standard definition of omnipotence as unsuccessful. Furthermore, he charges Swinburne, me, and analytic theists in general, with an excessive anthropomorphism that obliterates the distinction between Creator and creature. In response, I contend that all of Gleeson’s criticisms are unsound.
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  27.  3
    Andrew Eshleman (2010). Religious Fictionalism Defended: Reply to Cordry: Andrew Eshleman. Religious Studies 46 (1):91-96.
    In his paper, ‘A critique of religious fictionalism’, Benjamin Cordry raises a series of objections to a fictionalist form of religious non-realism that I proposed in my earlier paper, ‘Can an atheist believe in God?’. They fall into two main categories: those alleging that an atheist would be unjustified in adopting fictionalism, and those alleging that fictionalism could not be successfully implemented, or practised communally. I argue that these objections can be met.
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  28.  28
    Richard Schaefer (2015). Andrew Dickson White and the History of a Religious Future. Zygon 50 (1):7-27.
    Andrew Dickson White played a pivotal role in constructing the image of a necessary, and even violent, confrontation between religion and science that persists to this day. Though scholars have long acknowledged that his position is more complex, given that White claimed to be saving religion from theology, there has been no attempt to explore what this means in light of his overwhelming attack on existing religions. This essay draws attention to how White's role as a historian was decisive (...)
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  29.  3
    Jason Holt (forthcoming). Mumford on Aesthetic–Moral Interaction in Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-9.
    Stephen Mumford argues that aesthetic and moral values in sport are interdependent, focusing on cases where immorality taints beautiful performance. This interdependence thesis is insightful but, I argue, in need of refinement, as its normative implications are unclear and perhaps implausible. I also challenge Mumford’s perspective on the infamous Dynamo Kiev death match. Whereas Mumford claims that the match’s morally oppressive circumstances detract from it so that ‘it was not something knowingly we should have admired aesthetically’, I (...)
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  30.  25
    Daniel Putman (2010). Was Andrew Carnegie Generous? Think 9 (26):91-98.
    Millions of Americans, as well as millions in Europe, have used or will use a library established by Andrew Carnegie. In his lifetime Carnegie gave the equivalent of several billion dollars in today's money to establish 1,689 public libraries in the United States, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Moreover, 660 libraries in Britain and Ireland, 125 in Canada, 17 in New Zealand, 12 in South Africa and scattered others around the world exist because of this man. 1 And this does (...)
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  31. Stathos Psillos, Stephen Mumford's Laws in Nature.
    Mumford presents the friends of laws with a Central Dilemma, either horn of which is supposed to be utterly unpalatable. The thrust of the dilemma is this: laws are either external or internal to their instances. If they are external, they cannot govern (or determine) their instances. If they are internal, they cannot govern (or determine) their instances. Ergo, laws cannot govern (or determine) their instances. The role of this dilemma is central to Mumford’s argument against laws: they (...)
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  32.  76
    Neil Edward Williams (2009). The Ungrounded Argument is Unfounded: A Response to Mumford. Synthese 170 (1):7 - 19.
    Arguing against the claim that every dispositional property is grounded in some property other than itself, Stephen Mumford presents what he calls the ‘Ungrounded Argument’. If successful, the Ungrounded Argument would represent a major victory for anti-Humean metaphysics over its Humean rivals, as it would allow for the existence of primitive modality. Unfortunately, Humeans need not yet be worried, as the Ungrounded Argument is itself lacking in grounding. I indicate where Mumford’s argument falls down, claiming that even the (...)
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  33.  37
    Peter Murphy (2011). Painting's Double: Andrew Benjamin's Disclosing Spaces. Thesis Eleven 104 (1):108-113.
    Andrew Benjamin’s book Disclosing Spaces (2004) presents a theory of painting. The theory is developed via a meticulous analysis of a series of individual artworks. The pivot of Benjamin’s theory of painting is the idea of relationality. The theory is critically reviewed with reference to the works of Edward Hopper, Gerhard Richter and Jacques-Louis David.
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  34.  33
    P. Mackie (2014). Mumford and Anjum on Incompatibilism, Powers and Determinism. Analysis 74 (4):593-603.
    Mumford and Anjum (2014) present a new argument for the incompatibility of free will and causal determinism. Although their argument depends on the assumption that free will is, or is the exercise of, a causal power, it does not appeal to any special features of this power. Their new argument does, however, depend upon a general thesis of the incompatibility of causal powers with causal determinism. I argue that Mumford and Anjum have provided no justification for this general (...)
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  35.  61
    John Hawthorne & David Manley (2005). Stephen Mumford. Dispositions. . Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. 261 Pp. [REVIEW] Noûs 39 (1):179–195.
    In Mumford’s Dispositions, the reader will find an extended treatment of the recent debate about dispositions from Ryle and Geach to the present. Along the way, Mumford presents his own views on several key points, though we found the book much more thorough in its assessment of opposing views than in the development of a positive account. As we’ll try to make clear, some of the ideas endorsed in Dispositions are certainly worth pursuing; others are not. Following Mackie, (...)
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  36.  1
    Andrew Williams (2004). I—Andrew Williams. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):131-150.
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  37.  10
    Beth Eddy (2015). Science, Democracy, and the American University: From the Civil War to the Cold War by Andrew Jewett. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 36 (2):194-198.
    Intellectual historian Andrew Jewett sets an enormous task for himself: to trace the history and context of science and values relations over the course of some hundred-odd years of U.S. history. He does this to further an argument that science was once explicitly connected to the study of human values, and that the story that explains how science became value neutral is a contingent one. It could have happened differently, he argues, and it should have. Furthermore, because that history (...)
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  38.  67
    William O. Stephens (2011). If Friendship Hurts, an Epicurean Deserts : A Reply to Andrew Mitchell. In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Essays in Philosophy. Rodopi 7.
    In “Friendship Amongst the Self-Sufficient: Epicurus” (this Journal, Vol. 2, No. 2, June 2001), Andrew Mitchell explores the Epicurean view of the relationship between self-sufficiency and friendship by contrasting it with the views of Aristotle and the Stoics. Epicurus, Aristotle, and the Stoics do indeed have interestingly different views on friendship that are well worth comparing. Yet Mitchell’s characterization of Aristotelian friendship is misleading, his account of Stoic friendship is inaccurate, and his interpretation of Epicurean friendship is curiously imaginative (...)
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  39.  19
    Andrew V. Abela (2001). Catholic Social Teaching and the Purpose of the Firm1 Andrew I/. Abela. Journal of Business Ethics 31:2.
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  40.  27
    Steve Clarke (2003). Response to Mumford and Another Definition of Miracles. Religious Studies 39 (4):459-463.
    Stephen Mumford concludes a recent paper in Religious Studies, in which he advances a new causation-based analysis of miracles, by stating that the onus is ‘on rival accounts of miracles to produce something that matches it’. I take up Mumford 's challenge, defending an intention-based definition of miracles, which I developed earlier, that he criticizes. I argue that this definition of miracles is more consistent with ordinary intuitions about miracles than Mumford 's causation-based alternative. I further argue (...)
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  41.  21
    Andrew J. Reck (1958). The Philosophy of Andrew Ushenko: I. Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):471 - 485.
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  42.  2
    Donatella Di Cesare, Trawny Peter, Andrew J. Mitchell & Reinhard Mehring (2016). Donatella Di Cesare: Heidegger, die Juden, die Shoah und Peter Trawny, Andrew J. Mitchell : Heidegger, die Juden, noch einmal. Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 69 (2):137-146.
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  43.  37
    Gideon Calder & Andrew Collier (2009). Values and Ontology: An Interview with Andrew Collier, Part. Journal of Critical Realism 8 (1):63-90.
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  44.  31
    Dan Ryder, Critical Notice of Stephen Mumford's Dispositions.
    Stephen Mumford's Dispositions1 is an interesting and thought-provoking addition to a recent surge of publications on the topic.2 Dispositions have not been such a hot topic since the heyday of behaviourism. But as Mumford argues in his first chapter, the importance of dispositions to contemporary philosophy can hardly be underestimated. Dispositions are fundamental to causal role functionalism in the philosophy of mind, response-dependent truth conditional accounts of moral and other concepts,3 capacity accounts of concepts more generally,4 theories of (...)
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  45.  3
    S. J. L. Edwards (2000). Can Unequal Be More Fair? A Response to Andrew Avins. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):179-182.
    In this paper, we respond to Andrew Avins's recent review of methods whose use he advocates in clinical trials, to make them more ethical. He recommends in particular, “unbalanced randomisation”. However, we argue that, before such a recommendation can be made, it is important to establish why unequal randomisation might offer ethical advantages over equal randomisation, other things being equal. It is important to make a pragmatic distinction between trials of treatments that are already routinely available and trials of (...)
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  46.  6
    Paola Marrati, Andrew Norris, Jörg Volbers, Cary Wolfe & Thomas Dumm (2012). The Political Theory of Stanley Cavell: The Ordinary Life of Democracy Paola Marrati Skepticism, Finitude and Politics in the Work of Stanley Cavell Andrew Norris Crossing the Bounds of Sense: Cavell and Foucault Jörg Volbers Cavell's 'Forms of Life' and Biopolitics Cary Wolfe Misgiving, or Cavell's Gift Thomas Dumm Responses. Contemporary Political Theory 11 (4):397-429.
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  47.  10
    Doohwan Ahn (2011). From Greece to Babylon:The Political Thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay (1686–1743). History of European Ideas 37 (4):421-437.
    This paper explores the political thought of Andrew Michael Ramsay with particular reference to his highly acclaimed book called A New Cyropaedia, or the Travels of Cyrus (1727). Dedicated to Prince Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, to whom he was tutor, this work has been hitherto viewed as a Jacobite imitation of the Telemachus, Son of Ulysses(1699) of his eminent teacher archbishop Fénelon of Cambrai. By tracing the dual legacy of the first Persian Emperor Cyrus in Western thought, (...)
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  48.  8
    Matt Matravers (2016). Symposium on Andrew Simester and Andreas von Hirsch, Crimes, Harms, and Wrongs: On the Principles of Criminalisation. Criminal Law and Philosophy 10 (2):297-299.
    Andrew Simester and Andreas von Hirsch’s Crimes, Harms, and Wrongs: On the Principles of Criminalisation (Simester and von Hirsch 2011) is an important contribution to the philosophical debate over the nature and ethical limits of criminalisation. As they note in their reply in this symposium, one of the novel aspects of their account is that they do not advance one “unified, grand theory”. Rather, they analyse each ground of criminal prohibition—wrongfulness, harm-based, offense, and paternalistic prohibitions aimed at preventing self-harm—so (...)
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  49.  17
    Nicolas de Warren (2007). Off the Beaten Path: The Artworks of Andrew Goldsworthy. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1-2):29-48.
    This essay explores Heidegger’s “The Origin of the Work of Art” and Andrew Goldsworthy’s artworks. Both Heidegger and Goldsworthy can be seen as refashioning our ontological bearings towards nature through the work of art. After introducing a set of distinctions (e.g., world/earth) in the context of Heidegger’s conception of the artwork as the event of truth, I argue that Heidegger’s releasing of the work of art from metaphysical notions of “the thing” illuminates the ambiguous status of Goldsworthy’s artworks as (...)
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  50.  9
    Gregory Flaxman (2001). The Laws of Cinematic Hospitality: A Response to Andrew Murphie. Film-Philosophy 5 (2).
    Andrew Murphie 'Is Philosophy Ever Enough?' _Film-Philosophy_, Deleuze Special Issue vol. 5 no. 38, November 2001.
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