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Andrew M. Pomerantz [9]Andrew Pomerantz [2]
  1. Julie Ann Smith, Andrew M. Pomerantz, Jonathan C. Pettibone & Daniel J. Segrist (2012). When Does a Professional Relationship with a Psychologist Begin? An Empirical Investigation. Ethics and Behavior 22 (3):208 - 217.
    Research on multiple relationships by practicing psychologists has typically presumed the presence of a professional relationship and focused on the ethicality of subsequent, nonprofessional relationships. Instead, this study focused on the question of what, exactly, constitutes the professional relationship in the first place. Practicing psychologists and undergraduates responded to vignettes portraying various early stages of interaction between a therapist and a prospective client. Participants' responses indicated that determinations of professional relationship establishment, and the ethicality of subsequent nonprofessional relationships, depended upon (...)
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  2. Danice L. Brown & Andrew M. Pomerantz (2011). Multicultural Incompetence and Other Unethical Behaviors: Perceptions of Therapist Practices. Ethics and Behavior 21 (6):498 - 508.
    The present study examined nonprofessionals' perceptions of culturally based and noncultural ethical violations. One hundred seventy-four undergraduates students read 12 vignettes depicting situations in which a clinician committed either a culturally based violation (e.g., sexist or ageist behavior) or a noncultural violation (e.g., breeching confidentiality or multiple relationship). Results indicated that participants were more likely to have unfavorable views of clinicians who had committed culturally based violations. In addition, results suggested that participants would be more likely to report a clinician (...)
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  3. Jonathan C. Pettibone, Daniel J. Segrist, Andrew M. Pomerantz & Bailey E. Williams (2010). How Impaired Is Too Impaired? Ratings of Psychologist Impairment by Psychologists in Independent Practice. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):149-160.
    Although psychologist impairment has received attention from researchers, there is a paucity of empirical data aimed at determining the point at which such impairment necessitates action. The purpose of this study was to provide such empirical data. Members of Division 42 ( n = 285) responded to vignettes describing a psychologist whose symptoms of either depression or substance abuse varied across five levels of severity. Results identified specific levels of impairment at which psychologists were deemed too impaired to practice psychotherapy, (...)
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  4. Bailey E. Williams, Andrew M. Pomerantz, Daniel J. Segrist & Jonathan C. Pettibone (2010). How Impaired is Too Impaired? Ratings of Psychologist Impairment by Psychologists in Independent Practice. Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):149 – 160.
    Although psychologist impairment has received attention from researchers, there is a paucity of empirical data aimed at determining the point at which such impairment necessitates action. The purpose of this study was to provide such empirical data. Members of Division 42 ( n = 285) responded to vignettes describing a psychologist whose symptoms of either depression or substance abuse varied across five levels of severity. Results identified specific levels of impairment at which psychologists were deemed too impaired to practice psychotherapy, (...)
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  5. Jennifer Lowe, Andrew M. Pomerantz & Jon C. Pettibone (2007). The Influence of Payment Method on Psychologists' Diagnostic Decisions: Expanding the Range of Presenting Problems. Ethics and Behavior 17 (1):83 – 93.
    Previous research (Kielbasa, Pomerantz, Krohn, & Sullivan, 2004; Pomerantz & Segrist, 2006) indicates that when psychologists consider a client with symptoms of depression or anxiety, payment method significantly influences diagnostic decisions. This study extends the scope of the previous research to consider clients with symptoms of social phobia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Psychologists in independent practice responded to vignettes of clients whose descriptions deliberately included subclinical impairment. Half of the participants were told that the clients would pay via (...)
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  6. William Nelson, Gili Lushkov, Andrew Pomerantz & William B. Weeks (2006). Rural Health Care Ethics: Is There a Literature? American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):44 – 50.
    To better understand the available publications addressing ethical issues in rural health care we sought to identify the ethics literature that specifically focuses on rural America. We wanted to determine the extent to which the rural ethics literature was distributed between general commentaries, descriptive summaries of research, and original research publications. We identified 55 publications that specifically and substantively addressed rural health care ethics, published between 1966 and 2004. Only 7 (13%) of these publications were original research articles while (12) (...)
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  7. William Nelson, Andrew Pomerantz & William Weeks (2006). Response to Commentaries on “Is There a Rural Ethics Literature?”. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):W46-W47.
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  8. Andrew M. Pomerantz & Dan J. Segrist (2006). The Influence of Payment Method on Psychologists' Diagnostic Decisions Regarding Minimally Impaired Clients. Ethics and Behavior 16 (3):253 – 263.
    Are psychotherapy clients who pay via health insurance more likely to receive Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV], American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnoses than identical clients who pay out of pocket? Previous research (Kielbasa, Pomerantz, Krohn, & Sullivan, 2004) indicates that when psychologists consider a mildly depressed or anxious client, payment method significantly influences diagnostic decisions. This study extends the scope of the previous study to include clients whose symptoms are even less severe. Independent practitioners responded (...)
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  9. Andrew M. Pomerantz (2005). Increasingly Informed Consent: Discussing Distinct Aspects of Psychotherapy at Different Points in Time. Ethics and Behavior 15 (4):351 – 360.
    Psychologists are ethically obligated to obtain informed consent to psychotherapy "as early as is feasible" (American Psychological Association, 2002, p. 1072). However, the range of topics to be addressed includes both information that may be immediately and uniformly applicable to most clients via policy or rule, as well as information that is not immediately presentable because it varies widely across clients or emerges over time. In this study, licensed psychologists were surveyed regarding the earliest feasible point at which they could (...)
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  10. Amy M. Kielbasa, Andrew M. Pomerantz, Emily J. Krohn & Bryce F. Sullivan (2004). How Does Clients' Method of Payment Influence Psychologists' Diagnostic Decisions? Ethics and Behavior 14 (2):187 – 195.
    To what extent does payment method (managed care vs. out of pocket) influence the likelihood that an independent practitioner will assign a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnosis to a client? When a practitioner does diagnose, how does payment method influence the specific choice of a diagnostic category? Independent practitioners responded to a vignette describing a fictitious client with symptoms of depression or anxiety. In half of the vignettes, the fictitious client intended to pay (...)
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  11. Andrew M. Pomerantz (2000). What If Prospective Clients Knew How Managed Care Impacts Psychologists' Practice and Ethics? An Exploratory Study. Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):159 – 171.
    Modal responses to items from a recent survey of independent practitioners regarding the impact of managed care on their practices and ethics (Murphy, DeBernardo, & Shoemaker, 1998) were presented to participants as the responses of a hypothetical independent practitioner. Participants were asked to consider seeing this hypothetical practitioner both before and after being informed of the practitioner's responses to the managed care survey. Results indicate that when participants were informed of the practitioner's views toward managed care, their own attitudes toward (...)
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