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  1. Andrew R. Cline (2011). Is the Language of Journalism Ethically Justifiable? Journal of Mass Media Ethics 26 (2):181 - 183.
    Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Volume 26, Issue 2, Page 181-183, April-June.
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  2. Andrew R. Cline (2009). Putting Journalism's Unwritten Theory of Democracy Onto Paper. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 24 (2 & 3):194 – 196.
  3. Andrew R. Cline (2008). Ethics and Ethos: Writing an Effective Newspaper Ombudsman Position. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 23 (2):79 – 89.
    Ombudsmen are profoundly a part of the ethos of newspaper journalism. In this essay, I argue that Daniel Okrent's tenure as the public editor of The New York Times provides American journalism and individual ombudsmen a model by which to meet part of the ethical standard Meyers (2000) posits. I assume that individual ombudsmen should assert moral authority in the position through a persuasive use of rhetorical ethos. The ethical appeals of Okrent and Michael Getler, ombudsman at the Washington Post, (...)
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  4. Doug McGill, Jeremy Iggers & Andrew R. Cline (2007). Death in Gambella: What Many Heard, What One Blogger Saw, and Why the Professional News Media Ignored It. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 22 (4):280 – 299.
    Doug McGill published several articles about the massacre of 425 members of the Anuak tribe by the Ethiopian military in 2003 and 2004 on his Web site, The McGill Report. The mainstream news media ignored it. McGill's narrative demonstrates the impact of his reporting on the Anuak community worldwide, its impact on several beneficiary groups in the United States, and the lack of interest by the mainstream news media that failed to fulfill journalism's primary purpose. Two responses follow McGill's narrative. (...)
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