Search results for 'Andrew T. Brie' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. B. Delfgaauw, A. Pattin, Carlos Steel, H. Sonneville, G. Fuller, G. A. De Brie, J. Janssens, F. De Keyser, M. T. Van Reijen & A. Van de Putte (1978). Bibliografische Nota's. [REVIEW] Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 40 (2):353 - 358.score: 240.0
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  2. Brie Gertler (2004). We Can't Know a Priori That H2O Exists. But Can We Know a Priori That Water Does? Analysis 64 (1):44-47.score: 24.0
  3. Kristin Shrader-Frechette, Human Rights and Duties to Alleviate Environmental Injustice: The Domestic Case.score: 24.0
    To the degree that citizens have participated in, or derived benefits from, social in- stitutions that have helped cause serious, life-threatening, or rights-threatening envi- ronmental injustice (EIJ), this article argues that they have duties either to stop their participation in these institutions or to compensate for it by helping to reform them. (EIJ occurs whenever children, poor people, minorities, or other subgroups bear dis- proportionate burdens of life-threatening or seriously harmful pollution.) After briefly defining “human rights,” the article defends the (...)
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  4. Gary Bartlett (2010). Recent Texts in Philosophy of Mind. Teaching Philosophy 33 (3):291-307.score: 24.0
    The field of textbooks in philosophy of mind is a crowded one. I shall consider six recent texts for their pedagogical usefulness. All have been published within the last five years, though two are new editions of previously published books. The first three are authored monographs: by K. T. Maslin, Barbara Montero, and André Kukla and Joel Walmsley. I then review three anthologies, each with two editors: William Lycan and Jesse Prinz, Brie Gertler and Lawrence Shapiro, and Brian McLaughlin (...)
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  5. Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen, Entitlement in Mathematics.score: 24.0
    Crispin Wright has recently introduced a non-evidential notion of warrant – entitlement of cognitive project – as a promising response to certain sceptical arguments, which have been subject to extensive discussion within mainstream epistemology. The central idea is that, for a given class of cognitive projects, there are certain basic propositions – entitlements – which one is warranted in trusting provided there is no sufficient reason to think them false. (See Wrigh [2].) The aim of this paper is to provide (...)
     
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  6. Henk Zeevat, Demonstratives on Pictures.score: 24.0
    Kaplan's theory of demonstratives and deicticals can be brie y stated as follows. Expressions of this kind depend for their interpretation on the context of utterance and in a context of utterance they refer directly to whatever they refer to. Direct reference in turn consists in two properties. The rst property is the absence of a Fregean sense. The context does its work once and for all and the reference is not in uenced by a counterfactual circumstance in which (...)
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  7. E. Reck, Reviewed By.score: 24.0
    CHRISTOPHER PINCOCK, Department of Philosophy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA The volume under review contains fifteen new essays by some of the most influential scholars of the history of early analytic philosophy. The focus of the essays is, as the editor says in the preface, ‘the work of Gottlob Frege and of Ludwig Wittgenstein (mostly the early Wittgenstein), as well as various ties between them’ (p. x). The essays are divided into four parts. The first part, ‘Background and (...)
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  8. Brie Gertler (ed.) (2003). Privileged Access: Philosophical Accounts of Self-Knowledge. Ashgate.score: 12.0
    When read as demands for justification, these questions seem absurd. We don’t normally ask people to substantiate assertions like “I think it will rain tomorrow” or “I have a headache”. There is, at the very least, a strong presumption that sincere self-attributions about one’s thoughts and feelings are true. In fact, some philosophers believe that such self-attributions are less susceptible to doubt than any other claims. Even those who reject that extreme view generally acknowledge that there is some salient epistemic (...)
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