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  1. Andrew Whiten (2013). Culture and the Evolution of Interconnected Minds. In Simon Baron-Cohen, Michael Lombardo & Helen Tager-Flusberg (eds.), Understanding Other Minds: Perspectives From Developmental Social Neuroscience. Oup Oxford. 431.
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  2. Andrew Whiten (2008). Imitation, Emulation, and the Transmission of Culture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):39-40.
    Three related issues are addressed. First, Hurley treats emulation and imitation as a straightforward dichotomy with emulation emerging first. Recent conceptual analyses and chimpanzee experiments challenge this. Second, other recent chimpanzee experiments reveal high-fidelity social transmission, questioning whether copying fidelity is the brake on cumulative culture. Finally, other cognitive processes such as pretence need to be integrated.
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  3. Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland (2006). A Science of Culture: Clarifications and Extensions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):366-375.
    We are encouraged that the majority of commentators endorse our evolutionary framework for studying culture, and several suggest extensions. Here we clarify our position, dwelling on misunderstandings and requests for exposition. We reiterate that using evolutionary biology as a model for unifying the social sciences within a single synthetic framework can stimulate a more progressive and rigorous science of culture. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  4. Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland (2006). Towards a Unified Science of Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):329-347.
    We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a good match with (...)
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  5. Andrew Whiten (2003). Theory of Mind. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  6. Andrew Whiten (2001). Imitation and Cultural Transmission in Apes and Cetaceans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):359-360.
    Recent evidence suggests imitation is more developed in some cetaceans than the authors imply. Apart from apes, only dolphins have so far shown a grasp of what it is to imitate; moreover dolphins ape humans more clearly than do apes. Why have such abilities not been associated with the kind of progressive cultural complexity characteristic of humans?
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  7. Andrew Whiten (2001). Theory of Mind in Non-Verbal Apes: Conceptual Issues and the Critical Experiments. In D. Walsh (ed.), Evolution, Naturalism and Mind. Cambridge University Press. 199-223.
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  8. Justin H. G. Williams, Andrew Whiten, Thomas Suddendorf & David I. Perrett (2001). Imitation, Mirror Neurons and Autism. Philosophical Explorations.
    Various deficits in the cognitive functioning of people with autism have been documented in recent years but these provide only partial explanations for the condition. We focus instead on an imitative disturbance involving difficulties both in copying actions and in inhibiting more stereotyped mimicking, such as echolalia. A candidate for the neural basis of this disturbance may be found in a recently discovered class of neurons in frontal cortex, 'mirror neurons' (MNs). These neurons show activity in relation both to specific (...)
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  9. Andrew Whiten (2000). Primate Culture and Social Learning. Cognitive Science 24 (3):477-508.
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  10. Andrew Whiten (1998). How Imitators Represent the Imitated: The Vital Experiments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):707-708.
    Byrne & Russon rightly draw attention to complex and neglected aspects of ape imitation. However, program-level imitation as a single, absolute category may mislead us in understanding abstractions involved in imitation. Designing the right experiments will offer clarity. One recent experiment has shown imitation of sequential structure: What is needed to test other components of what the authors propose?
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  11. Andrew Whiten (1998). Triangulation, Intervening Variables, and Experience Projection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):132-133.
    I focus on the logic of the goggles experiment, which if it as watertight as Heyes argues, should clearly support ape theory of mind if positive, and clearly reject it if negative. This is not the case, since the experiment tests for only one kind of mindreading, “experience projection”: but it is an excellent test for this, given adequate controls.
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  12. Andrew Whiten (1996). Imitation, Pretence and Mindreading: Secondary Representation in Comparative Primatology and Developmental Psychology. In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press. 300--324.
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  13. Andrew Whiten (1996). 17 When Does Smart Behaviour-Reading Become Mind-Reading? In Peter Carruthers & Peter K. Smith (eds.), Theories of Theories of Mind. Cambridge University Press. 277.
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  14. Andrew Whiten (1993). Human Enculturation, Chimpanzee Enculturation (?) and the Nature of Imitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):538.
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  15. Andrew Whiten (1993). Social Complexity: The Roles of Primates' Grooming and People's Talking. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):719.
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  16. R. W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (1988). Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans. Oxford University Press.
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
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