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Profile: Andrew Williams (University of Warwick, Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
  1. Andrew Williams (1998). Incentives, Inequality, and Publicity. Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (3):225–247.
    The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing for long-term preservation and access to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported by libraries, scholarly societies, publishers, and foundations. It is an initiative of JSTOR, a not-for-profit organization with a mission to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in technology. For more information regarding JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
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  2. Andrew Williams (2008). Justice, Incentives and Constructivism. Ratio 21 (4):476-493.
    In Rescuing Justice and Equality , G. A. Cohen reiterates his critique of John Rawls's difference principle as a justification for inequality-generating incentives, and also argues that Rawls's ambition to provide a constructivist defence of the first principles of justice is doomed. Cohen's arguments also suggest a natural response to my earlier attempt to defend the basic structure objection to Cohen's critique, which I term the alien factors reply. This paper criticises the reply, and Cohen's more general argument against Rawls's (...)
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  3.  45
    Andrew Williams (2012). The Priority View Bites the Dust? Utilitas 24 (03):315-331.
    This article distinguishes between a telic and a deontic version of Derek Parfit's influential Priority View. Employing the distinction, it shows that the existence of variations in how intrapersonal and interpersonal conflicts should be resolved fails to provide a compelling case in favour of relational egalitarianism and against all pure versions of the Priority View. In addition, the article argues that those variations are better understood as providing counterevidence to certain distribution-sensitive versions of consequentialism.
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  4.  45
    Andrew Williams (2004). Equality, Ambition and Insurance. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):131–150.
    [Andrew Williams] It is difficult for prioritarians to explain the degree to which justice requires redress for misfortune in a way that avoids imposing unreasonably high costs on more advantaged individuals whilst also economising on intuitionist appeals to judgment. An appeal to hypothetical insurance may be able to solve the problems of cost and judgment more successfully, and can also be defended from critics who claim that resource egalitarianism is best understood to favour the ex post elimination of envy over (...)
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  5.  70
    Andrew Williams (2000). The Alleged Incompleteness of Public Reason. Res Publica 6 (2):199-211.
    According to John Rawls's ideal of liberal public reason, comprehensive moral, religious and philosophical doctrines should play no more than an auxiliary or marginal role in the political life of constitutional democracies. David Reidy has recently claimed that since liberal public reason is incomplete, comprehensive doctrines, and non-public reasons, must play a wider role than Rawls admits. In response, I argue that Reidy's arguments do not establish that liberal public reason is incomplete. Furthermore, even if the substantive values embodied in (...)
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  6. Andrew Williams (2001). Book Review. On Nationality David Miller. [REVIEW] Mind 110 (438):512-516.
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  7.  30
    Paula Casal & Andrew Williams (2004). Equality of Resources and Procreative Justice. In Ronald Dworkin & Justine Burley (eds.), Dworkin and His Critics: With Replies by Dworkin. Blackwell Pub. 150--169.
  8.  17
    Andrew Williams (2013). How Gifts and Gambles Preserve Justice. Economics and Philosophy 29 (1):65-85.
    This paper examines G. A. Cohen's final criticism of Ronald Dworkin's theory of equality of resources, which targets its treatment of inequalities that arise when some individuals make luckier choices than others make. Rebutting Cohen's argument that such option luck inequalities fail to be just in an unqualified sense, the paper argues that choice does not merely render inequality legitimate but instead can sometimes make inequality just. It also examines the relationship between Cohen's criticism and the conception of equality developed (...)
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  9.  48
    Andrew Williams (2002). Dworkin on Capability. Ethics 113 (1):23-39.
  10.  30
    Andrew D. Williams (1995). The Revisionist Difference Principle. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):257 - 281.
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  11. Matthew Clayton & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2000). The Ideal of Equality. Macmillan.
     
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  12.  26
    Andrew Williams (2002). Equality for the Ambitious. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 52 (208):377–389.
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  13.  10
    Andrew J. Williams (2010). The Ethos of Europe: Values, Law and Justice in the Eu. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. Peace; 3. Rule of law; 4. Human rights; 5. Democracy; 6. Liberty; 7. The institutional ethos of the EU; 8. Towards the EU as a just institution; 9. Concluding proposals.
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  14.  34
    Andrew Williams (1999). Resource Egalitarianism and the Limits to Basic Income. Economics and Philosophy 15 (1):85.
    In his widely-discussed book, Real Freedom for All, Philippe Van Parijs argues that justice requires the provision of a universal, unconditional basic income. Some critics reject that conclusion on the grounds that it violates requirements of reciprocity or prohibitions on exploitation, free-riding and parasitism. This paper explores a less familiar critique, which operates within the same resource egalitarian parameters as Van Parijs's argument, and leaves unchallenged his conviction that justice requires a basic income. Instead the paper suggests two reasons to (...)
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  15. Andrew Williams (1998). Incentives, Inequality, and Publicity. Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (3):225-247.
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  16.  9
    Hillel Steiner, Ulrich Steinvorth, Rex Martin, Guido Pincione, Horacio Spector, Paula Casal & Andrew Williams (1995). Rational Rights. Analyse & Kritik 17 (1):3-11.
    A rational moral code must satisfy the condition of completeness. This same condition applies to a set of moral rights, where it takes the form of requiring that all the rights in that set be compossible: that their respective correlatively entailed duties be jointly fulfillable. Such joint fulfillability is guaranteed only by a set of fully differentiated individual domains. And if moral rights are to play any independent role in moral reasoning - any role logically independent of the values that (...)
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  17. Shlomi Segall, Hillel Steiner, Zofia Stemplowska, Andrew Williams & Jo Wolff (2011). 8.1 The Concept of Agent Responsibility. In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press
  18. Andrew Williams (2004). I—Andrew Williams. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):131-150.
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  19.  5
    Andrew Williams (1997). The Limits of Lockean Rights in Property. Philosophical Review 106 (4):587-588.
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  20.  2
    Andrew T. Williams (2009). Taking Values Seriously: Towards a Philosophy of EU Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (3):549-577.
    This article argues that the existing philosophy of EU law, such as it may be perceived, is flawed. Through a series of propositions it claims that EU law is infected by an underlying indeterminacy of ideal that has deeply affected the appreciation and realization of stated values. These values, the most fundamental of which appear in Article 6(1) of the Treaty of European Union, have been applied in a haphazard fashion and without an understanding of normative content. The European Court (...)
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  21.  3
    Andrew Williams (2002). Review: Equality for the Ambitious. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 52 (208):377 - 389.
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  22.  1
    Andrew Williams (2009). Justícia, incentius i constructivisme. Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 43:15-30.
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  23. Paula Casal & Andrew Williams (1995). Rights, Equality and Procreation. Analyse & Kritik 17 (1):93-116.
    Individual decisions about how to exercise the legal right to procreative liberty may generate either positive or negative externalities. From within a resource egalitarian perspective, such as that of Ronald Dworkin, it can be argued that procreative justice is asymmetric in the following respect. Justice need not require that parents be subsidised if they produce a public good, yet its ideal achievement may require their activities be taxed if they threaten to produce a public bad.
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  24. Matthew Clayton & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2004). Social Justice. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This reader brings together classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume. Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin. Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations. Philosophically challenging yet accessible to (...)
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  25. Matthew Clayton & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2008). Social Justice. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This reader brings together classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume. Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin. Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations. Philosophically challenging yet accessible to (...)
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  26. Matthew Clayton & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2004). Social Justice. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This reader brings together classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. A collection of classic and contemporary contributions to debates about social justice. Includes classic discussions of justice by Locke and Hume. Provides broad coverage of contemporary discussions, including theoretical pieces by John Rawls, Robert Nozick and Ronald Dworkin. Contains papers that apply theories of justice to concrete issues, such as gender and the family, the market, world poverty, cultural rights, and future generations. Philosophically challenging yet accessible to (...)
     
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  27. Peter G. Mandaville & Andrew J. Williams (2003). Meaning and International Relations.
     
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  28. Andrew Reeve & Andrew Williams (eds.) (2003). Real Libertarianism Assessed: Political Theory After Van Parijs. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Philippe Van Parijs's Real Freedom for All is widely acclaimed for providing not only the most sophisticated defense of unconditional basic income, but also a rigorous examination of many central issues within contemporary political theory. This collection, including a response by Van Parijs, provides a comprehensive assessment of his "real libertarian" vision of radical social change. The contributors include Richard Arneson, Brian Barry, Thomas Christiano, John Cunliffe, Guido Erreygers, Hillel Steiner, Peter Vallentyne, Robert van der Veen, and Stuart White.
     
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  29. Andrew Williams (2006). Liberty, Liability, and Contractualism. In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality. Clarendon Press
     
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  30. Andrew T. Williams (2010). Promoting Justice After Lisbon: Groundwork for a New Philosophy of EU Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (4):663-693.
    The Lisbon Treaty’s ratification is complete. This article makes two related claims, one ethical, the other empirical. First, the EU should now be developed with the aim of making it a (more) just institution; and second, the amendments to the Treaties now introduced provide the constitutional inspiration so that the EU can so develop. In particular, there is a prospect for appropriate standards of justice to be applied in part through a revised philosophy of EU law. The article argues that (...)
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