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Profile: Andrew Youpa (Southern Illinois University)
  1. Matthew Kisner & Andrew Youpa (eds.) (forthcoming). Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press.
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  2. Andrew Youpa (2013). Descartes's Virtue Theory. Essays in Philosophy 14 (2):179-193.
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  3. Andrew Youpa (2011). LeBuffe , Michael . From Bondage to Freedom: Spinoza on Human Excellence .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 253. $74.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (2):456-460.
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  4. Andrew Youpa (2011). Spinoza on the Very Nature of Existence. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 35 (1):310-334.
    The official definitions that appear at the beginning of four of the five parts of the "Ethics" do not include an account of "existence." However Spinoza does provide a definition of “existence” in the scholium to proposition 45 of Part 2. This is an odd place for such an important doctrine, and all the more so given that the account there differs from anything resembling commonsense. In this paper I show that, for Spinoza, to exist is to be eternal. Existence (...)
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  5. Andrew Youpa (2010). Spinoza's Model of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 61-76.
    Central to Spinoza’s ethical theory is a model of human nature: the model of the free man. In this paper I argue that the idea of the free man is an inadequate idea when this is understood as the idea of a perfectly free finite thing. But when properly understood--that is, when the idea of the free man is understood as the idea of the perfection of our nature and power--the idea of the free man is a way of conceiving (...)
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  6. Andrew Youpa (2010). Spinoza's Theories of Value. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (2):209 – 229.
    According to a widely accepted reading of the "Ethics," Spinoza subscribes to a desire-satisfaction theory of value. A desire-satisfaction theory says that what has value is the satisfaction of one’s desires and whatever leads to the satisfaction of one’s desires. In this paper I argue that this standard reading is incorrect, and I show that in Spinoza’s view the foundation of what is truly valuable is the perfection of a person’s essence, not the satisfaction of a person’s desires.
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  7. Andrew Youpa (2009). Spinoza's Theory of the Good. In Olli Koistinen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Spinoza's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    In this paper I argue that, for Spinoza, the power to produce effects through one's nature alone is the key constituent of the good life. Indeed, to exist in the strict sense is to be the causal source of effects. On this reading, a temporally long life that is entirely governed by causal factors external to one's essence is not a genuine existence.
     
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  8. Andrew Youpa, Leibniz's Ethics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  9. Andrew Youpa (2007). Spinoza's Theory of Motivation. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (3):375–390.
    On the basis of 3p9s and 3p39s of the Ethics, it might seem that, for Spinoza, a judgment about something's goodness or badness is motivationally inert and, moreover, that value judgments essentially reflect an individual's pre-existing motivational states. However, in this paper I show that Spinoza holds that under certain conditions a motivational state results from a value judgment. Spinoza's theory of motivation consists of two accounts of the psychological order of value judgments and motivational states: an account of their (...)
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  10. Andrew Youpa (2006). Leibniz and China: A Commerce of Light (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (1):125-126.
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  11. Andrew Youpa (2003). Spinozistic Self-Preservation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):477-490.
    In Part 4 of his "Ethics," Spinoza puts forward and defends what might appear to be the controversial Hobbesean thesis that the desire to prolong one’s life is the basis of virtue (i.e., E4p22). Indeed there is a tradition of commentators offering an egoistic, Hobbesean interpretation of Spinoza’s ethical theory. In this paper, however, I argue that we should not understand Spinozistic self-preservation in the commonsense, empiricist sense of prolonging our lives. Instead I argue that, for Spinoza, self-preservation is a (...)
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