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Profile: Andy Lamey (University of California, San Diego)
  1. Andy Lamey (forthcoming). Ecosystems as Spontaneous Orders. Critical Review.
    The notion of a spontaneous order has a long history in the philosophy of economics, where it has been used to advance a view of markets as complex networks of information that no single mind can apprehend. Traditionally, the impossibility of grasping all of the information present in the spontaneous order of the market has been invoked as grounds for not subjecting markets to central planning. A less noted feature of the spontaneous order concept is that when it is applied (...)
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  2. Andy Lamey (2014). Arguing for Open Borders. [REVIEW] Literary Review of Canada 22 (April):12-13.
    A review of The Ethics of Immigration, by Joseph Carens (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013).
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  3. Andy Lamey (2013). Feeling is Good, But Choosing is Better. [REVIEW] Scope (September 17).
    A Review of Can Animals Be Moral?, by Mark Rowlands (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).
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  4. Andy Lamey (2012). A Liberal Theory of Asylum. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (3):235-257.
    Hannah Arendt argued that refugees pose a major problem for liberalism. Most liberal theorists endorse the idea of human rights. At the same time, liberalism takes the existence of sovereign states for granted. When large numbers of people petition a liberal state for asylum, Arendt argued, these two commitments will come into conflict. An unwavering respect for human rights would mean that no refugee is ever turned away. Being sovereign, however, allows states to control their borders. States supposedly committed to (...)
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  5. Andy Lamey (2012). Primitive Self-Consciousness and Avian Cognition. The Monist 95 (3):486-510.
    Recent work in moral theory has seen the refinement of theories of moral standing, which increasingly recognize a position of intermediate standing between fully self-conscious entities and those which are merely conscious. Among the most sophisticated concepts now used to denote such intermediate standing is that of primitive self-consciousness, which has been used to more precisely elucidate the moral standing of human newborns. New research into the structure of the avian brain offers a revised view of the cognitive abilities of (...)
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  6. Andy Lamey (2011). Frontier Justice: The Global Refugee Crisis and What to Do About It. University of Queensland Press/Doubleday Canada.
  7. Andy Lamey (2010). Sympathy and Scapegoating in J.M. Coetzee. In Anton Leist & Peter Singer (eds.), J. M. Coetzee and Ethics: Philosophical Perspectives on Literature.
    J.M. Coetzee’s book, 'Elizabeth Costello' is one of the stranger works to appear in recent years. Yet if we focus our attention on the book’s two chapters dealing with animals, two preoccupations emerge. The first sees Coetzee use animals to evoke a particular conception of ethics, one similar to that of the philosopher Mary Midgley. Coetzee’s second theme connects animals to the phenomena of scapegoating, as it has been characterized by the philosophical anthropologist René Girard. While both themes involve human (...)
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  8. Andy Lamey (2010). The Thinking Man's Marxist. [REVIEW] The Literary Review of Canada (June).
    An essay-review of the work of G. A. Cohen, timed to the publication of Why Not Socialism?.
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  9. Andy Lamey (2007). Review of Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership by Martha C. Nussbaum. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 48 (4):376-81.
    A review of Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership, by Martha Nussbaum.
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  10. Andy Lamey (2007). Food Fight! Davis Versus Regan on the Ethics of Eating Beef. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (2):331–348.
    One of the starting assumptions in the debate over the ethical status of animals is that someone who is committed to reducing animal suffering should not eat meat. Steven Davis has recently advanced a novel criticism of this view. He argues that individuals who are committed to reducing animal suffering should not adopt a vegetarian or vegan diet, as Tom Regan an other animal rights advocates claim, but one containing free-range beef. To make his case Davis highlights an overlooked form (...)
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