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  1. Andy Miah, Rethinking Enhancement in Sport.
    Recent events in the sporting world have made explicit the moral, political, and cultural characteristics of discussions surrounding the use of enhancement technology in sport. Within the last 5 years, the landscape of sport technologies and policy has changed dramatically and it is reasonable to consider that further innovations are imminent. Elite sports constitute arenas for convergent technological applications where a range of applications demonstrates the embeddedness of sports within technological structures. The prospects for even more radical technologies to influence (...)
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  2. Andy Miah, Virtually Nothing: Re-Evaluating the Significance of Cyberspace.
    This paper provides a critical analysis of virtual environments made in recent leisure and cultural studies discussions, which claim virtual reality to be the technotopia of post-modern society. Such positions describe virtual realities as worlds of in nite freedom, which transcend human subjectivity and where identity becomes no longer burdened by the prejudices of persons. Arguing that cyberspace offers little more than a token gesture towards such liberation, the paper suggests a shift in focus from the power relations that might (...)
     
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  3. Andy Miah & Emma Rich, The Body, Health and Illness.
    The disciplinary boundaries of social studies on the body, health and illness are widely dispersed and no less so when inquiring into the subject of media representations. So much research from a range of disciplines seeps into this area that it can be difficult to draw meaningful boundaries around it. Such issues as disability, eating disorders, sexually transmitted diseases, mental disorder, cosmetic surgery, drug cultures and much more, all fall within this area of concern. Moreover, debates in other areas of (...)
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  4. Andy Miah, .../Cybersex/NoGender/No_sexuality/NoBody.Html.
    Published in in S. LaFont (Ed.) Constructing Sexualities: Readings in Sexuality, Gender, and Culture, New York, Prentice Hall, pp.362-370.
     
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  5. Andy Miah, Citation, Please Cite the Printed Work: Miah, A. (2006) Rethinking Enhancement in Sport, in Bainbridge, W.S. & Roco, M.C. 'Progress in Convergence: Technologies for Human Wellbeing.' Annals of The. [REVIEW]
    This chapter explores the arguments surrounding the use of human enhancement technologies in sport, arguing for a reconceptualization of the doping debate. First, it develops an overview and critique of the legislative structures on enhancement. Subsequently, a conceptual framework for understanding the role of technological effects in sport is advanced. Finally, two case studies (hypoxic chambers and gene transfer) receive specific attention, through which it is argued that human enhancement technologies can enrich the practice of elite sports rather than diminish (...)
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  6. Andy Miah, Citation. Please Cite Final Print Document: Miah, A. (2008) Section 7 Introduction: Ethical Considerations of Human Performance Optimisation, in Nigel A.S. Taylor, Herbert Groeller and Peter.. [REVIEW]
    At the beginning of the twenty-first century the ethics of performance are being pulled in two directions. The first of these embodies the spirit of the amateur athlete – itself an account of the broader social values ascribed to physical culture – which arose in the late nineteenth century and flourished in the early twentieth century (Hoberman 1992). The other beckons humanity towards a less familiar era, which is rooted in the democratisation of technology and where the human condition is (...)
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  7. Andy Miah, Climbing Upwards or Climbing Backwards?
    It is argued here that the mountain experience is evolving and that current climbing practices are at a point where the pursuit of mountains is becoming increasingly altered by technology. Such alteration requires addressing since it is unclear to what extent the use of technology enables or prevents specific kinds of mountain experience. Whilst acknowledging that technology can enable a greater variety of climbing experiences, it must also be accepted that technology can change climbing and mountaineering into pursuits that might (...)
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  8. Andy Miah, From Anti-Doping to a 'Performance Policy' Sport Technology, Being Human, and Doing Ethics.
    This paper discusses three questions concerning the ethics of performance enhancement in sport. The first has to do with the improvement to policy and argues that there is a need for policy about doping to be re-constituted and to question the conceptual priority of ‘anti’ doping. It is argued that policy discussions about science in sport must recognise the broader context of sport technology and seek to develop a policy about ‘performance’, rather than ‘doping’. The second argues that a quantitative (...)
     
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  9. Andy Miah, Genetic Modification (Gm) in Sport: Legal Implications.
    Despite an emerging body of literature, an analysis of the legal issues arising from science and technology in sport remains largely unexplored.1 Perhaps one of the most common areas for the synthesis of these issues is found in regard to the use of drugs and other doping methods. However, there remains no theorising about legal issues arising from the possibility of using genetic technologies in sport. Nevertheless, an awareness of the imminent use of genetic technologies by athletes is beginning to (...)
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  10. Andy Miah, Is Bigger Better? A Response to the International Tennis Federation's 'Bigger Balls' Proposal.
    Technological change within sport receives attention within the media only when an athlete or team has contravened the rules within a sport. In this respect, the use and effect of technology and, indeed, its apparent importance is comparable to the use of drugs in sport. Governing bodies of sport are keen to ensure that technology does not become too dominant within a competition and will endeavour to justify policy decisions on the basis of some essentialist conception of their sport. Again, (...)
     
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  11. Andy Miah, Justifying Human Enhancement: The Accumulation of Biocultural Capital.
    In: Wint, S.M.E. (2008) Perspectives on Our Ethical Future: Boundaries to Human Enhancements. London, Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA).
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  12. Andy Miah, “New Balls Please”: Tennis, Technology, and the Changing Game.
    The decision of the International Tennis Federation (July, 1999) to approve trials of different ball types represented a clear admission of the need for tennis to adapt to the enhanced competence of elite athletes. However, such action brings into question to what extent tennis is evolving beyond its modern appearance and how far such change is desirable. Over the last 30 years, advanced technology and athletic capability has resulted in male players having outgrown the structure of the game, which can (...)
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  13. Andy Miah, Patenting Human Dna.
    The scientific advances described in earlier chapters have inevitably triggered a response in the world of business and economics, and in this chapter I consider the recent activities of the American company, Celera Genomics, which aims to obtain patent rights for aspects of the human genome. This brings into question whether life, indeed human life, should belong to anyone or anybody. It raises, too, the further question as to how this new information will be used.
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  14. Andy Miah, The Human Rights of the Genetically Engineered Athlete.
    specific kind of human, one for whom there is potential for discrimination. For example.
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  15. Andy Miah, The Olympic Games and the Cyborg- Athlete: Any Room for Improvement?
    This paper is prompted by the radical emergence of technology that exists in contemporary sport and culture. Of particular interest are the technologies that threaten to alter an already changing concept of the human condition, such as genetic engineering and prosthetics. However, it is fundamental to consider the more subtle technologies, which influence change in sports, such as the equipment used by an athlete and the methods of training that are unmistakably technological. Such subtle technologies, I argue, can provoke a (...)
     
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  16. Andy Miah (forthcoming). Who Says It is Wrong? The Role o Fthe International Bioethics Committee. Philosophy Today.
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  17. Jon Entine, Bernd Heinrich, Clifford Geertz, Robert Scott, Greg Downey, Vilma Charlton, Dirk Lund Christensen, Loren Cordain, Søren Damkjaer, Joe Friel, Rachael Irving, Kerrie P. Lewis, Peter G. Mewett, Andy Miah, Timothy Noakes & Yannis P. Pitsiladis (2012). The Anthropology of Sport and Human Movement: A Biocultural Perspective. Lexington Books.
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  18. Andy Miah (2012). Genetic Technologies and Sport: The New Ethical Issue. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (1):32-52.
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  19. Andy Miah (2011). The State of the Art. In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities. 266.
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  20. Andy Miah (2009). " Blessed Are the Forgetful. In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. 137.
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  21. Andy Miah (2009). Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Gondry 2004) Pursues a Perennial Problem Within the Philosophy of Medicine: Whether Society Should Limit the Pursuit of Biological Modifications That Have No Clear Therapeutic Purpose. In the Context of Memory Modification, the Origin Ofthis Question has its Roots in Two Crucial Bodies of Literature. The First Concerns the Mind-Body Problem, Which Involves Attempting to Ascer-Tain Their Relationship. In Large Part, the Entire Practice of Medicine is Concerned with .. [REVIEW] In Sandra Shapshay (ed.), Bioethics at the Movies. Johns Hopkins University Press. 137.
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  22. Andy Miah (2008). A Deep Blue Grasshopper. Playing Games with Artificial Intelligence. In Benjamin Hale (ed.), Philosophy Looks at Chess. Open Court Press.
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  23. Andy Miah (2008). Engineering Greater Resilience or Radical Transhuman Enhancement? Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (1).
    Piety and patriotism are complex socio-cultural characteristics that are far removed from what is typically imagined as the kinds of traits that could or should be altered by genetic engineering.1 Yet, this comment by Glover is of interest to this paper for reasons other than its feasibility. It captures one of the central moral concerns that is often discussed in the context of human enhancement, that of the mode through which they would transform the moral values we hold. Thus, rather (...)
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  24. Andy Miah (2008). Letter to Utopia. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (1).
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  25. Bengt Kayser, Alexandre Mauron & Andy Miah (2007). Current Anti-Doping Policy: A Critical Appraisal. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):2.
    Current anti-doping in competitive sports is advocated for reasons of fair-play and concern for the athlete's health. With the inception of the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA), anti-doping effort has been considerably intensified. Resources invested in anti-doping are rising steeply and increasingly involve public funding. Most of the effort concerns elite athletes with much less impact on amateur sports and the general public.
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  26. Andy Miah (2007). Genetics, Bioethics and Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):146 – 158.
    This paper considers the relevance of human genetics as a case study through which links between bioethics and sport ethics have developed. Initially, it discusses the science of gene-doping and the ethics of policy-making in relation to future technologies, suggesting that the gene-doping example can elucidate concerns about the ethics of sport and human enhancement more generally. Subsequently, the conceptual overlap between sport and bioethics is explored in the context of discussions about doping. From here, the paper investigates the ethics (...)
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  27. Andy Miah & Alexandre Mauron (2007). Current Anti-Doping Policy: A Critical Appraisal. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-10.
    BackgroundCurrent anti-doping in competitive sports is advocated for reasons of fair-play and concern for the athlete's health. With the inception of the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA), anti-doping effort has been considerably intensified. Resources invested in anti-doping are rising steeply and increasingly involve public funding. Most of the effort concerns elite athletes with much less impact on amateur sports and the general public.DiscussionWe review this recent development of increasingly severe anti-doping control measures and find them based on questionable ethical grounds. (...)
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  28. Andy Miah (2006). Doctor, Can You Fix My Broken Heart? Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (2):127-129.
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  29. Andy Miah (2005). 4 Gene Doping. In Claudio Marcello Tamburrini & Torbjörn Tännsjö (eds.), Genetic Technology and Sport: Ethical Questions. Routledge. 42.
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  30. Andy Miah (2003). Be Very Afraid: Cyborg Athletes, Transhuman Ideals & Posthumanity. Journal of Evolution and Technology 13 (2).
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  31. Andy Miah, Gene-Doping: Sport, Values & Bioethics.
    This paper problematises the ethics of genetic modification (GM) in sport by outlining the perspectives of four organisations which have recently spent time considering the subject: the International Olympic Committee, the World Anti-Doping Agency, the United States President’s Council on Bioethics, and the Australian Law Reforms Commission. The paper outlines scientific developments in genetic research, which might make realisable the genetic engineering of athletes. Subsequently, an overview of the varied perspectives of the four organisations is given, by articulating the moral (...)
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