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  1. Angus Taylor (2012). Review of Paola Cavalieri's< Em> The Death of the Animal. [REVIEW] Between the Species 15 (1):10.
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  2. Angus Taylor (2010). Review of Wesley J. Smith's A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy: The Human Cost of the Animal Rights Movement. [REVIEW] Between the Species 13 (10):14.
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  3. Angus Taylor (ed.) (2009). Animals and Ethics, Third Edition. Broadview Press.
    Can animals be regarded as part of the moral community? To what extent, if at all, do they have moral rights? Are we wrong to eat them, hunt them, or use them for scientific research? Can animal liberation be squared with the environmental movement? Taylor traces the background of these debates from Aristotle to Darwin and sets out the views of numerous contemporary philosophers – including Peter Singer, Tom Regan, Mary Anne Warren, J. Baird Callicott, and Martha Nussbaum – with (...)
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  4. Angus Taylor (2008). Hunting for Consistency. Philosophy Now 67:8-10.
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  5. Angus Taylor (2006). Rod Preece, Brute Souls, Happy Beasts, and Evolution: The Historical Status of Animals Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (3):219-221.
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  6. Angus Taylor (2003). Animals and Ethics: An Overview of the Philosophical Debate. Broadview Press.
    "A previous edition of this book appeared under the title Magpies, Monkeys, and Morals. The new edition has been updated throughout.
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  7. Angus Taylor (1996). Animal Rights and Human Needs. Environmental Ethics 18 (3):249-264.
    The idea that animal rights can be married to environmental ethics is still a minority opinion. The land ethic of Aldo Leopold, as interpreted by J. Baird Callicott, remains fundamentally at odds with the ascription of substantial rights to (nonhuman) animals. Similarly, Laura Westra’s notion of “respectful hostility,” which attempts to reconcile a holistic environmental ethic with “respect” for animals, has no place for animal rights.In this paper, I argue that only by ascribing rights to sentient animals can an environmental (...)
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  8. Angus Taylor (1996). Nasty, Brutish, and Short: The Illiberal Intuition That Animals Don't Count. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (1-2):265-277.
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  9. Angus Taylor (1989). The Significance of Darwinian Theory for Marx and Engels. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (4):409-423.
     
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