Search results for 'Animal psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eric T. Olson (1997). The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Most philosophers writing about personal identity in recent years claim that what it takes for us to persist through time is a matter of psychology. In this groundbreaking new book, Eric Olson argues that such approaches face daunting problems, and he defends in their place a radically non-psychological account of personal identity. He defines human beings as biological organisms, and claims that no psychological relation is either sufficient or necessary for an organism to persist. Olson rejects several famous thought-experiments (...)
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  2.  37
    Peter Godfrey-Smith (2003). Folk Psychology Under Stress: Comments on Susan Hurley's Animal Action in the Space of Reasons. Mind and Language 18 (3):266-272.
    My commentary on Hurley is concerned with foundational issues. Hurley's investigation of animal cognition is cast within a particular framework—basically, a philosophically refined version of folk psychology. Her discussion has a complicated relationship to unresolved debates about the nature and status of folk psychology, especially debates about the extent to which folk psychological categories are aimed at picking out features of the causal organization of the mind.
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  3.  7
    Sue-Ellen Brown (2011). Theoretical Concepts From Self Psychology Applied to Animal Hoarding1. Society and Animals 19 (2):175-193.
    Self psychology provides a theoretical framework for understanding the psychology of the animal hoarder. The following ideas from self psychology can be applied to animal hoarders and their animals to gain insight into the nature of the bond between them: 1) animals can serve a crucial selfobject function, such as cohesion, for hoarders, regardless of the actual, objective reality of the state of the animals; 2) the concept of archaic vs. mature selfobject functioning elucidates how (...)
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  4.  7
    Marion Thomas (2005). Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425 - 460.
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts (...)
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  5.  4
    Alan Costall (1998). "Lloyd Morgan, and the Rise and Fall of" Animal Psychology". Society and Animals 6 (1):13-29.
    Whereas Darwin insisted upon the continuity of human and nonhuman animals, more recent students of animal behavior have largely assumed discontinuity. Lloyd Morgan was a pivotal figure in this transformation. His "canon, " although intended to underpin a psychological approach to animals, has been persistently misunderstood to be a stark prohibition of anthropomorphic description. His extension to animals of the terms "behavior" and "trial-and-error, " previously restricted to human psychology, again largely unwittingly devalued their original meaning and widened (...)
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  6.  5
    David A. H. Wilson (2002). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (2):235-262.
    It has been argued that if an animal is psychologically like us, there may be more scientific reason to experiment upon it, but less moral justification to do so. Some scientists deny the existence of this dilemma, claiming that although there are scientifically valuable similarities between humans and animals that make experimentation worthwhile, humans are at the same time unique and fundamentally different. This latter response is, ironically, typical of pre-Darwinian beliefs in the relationship between human and non-human animals. (...)
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  7.  21
    G. Thines & R. Zayan (1975). F. J. J. Buytendijk's Contribution to Animal Behaviour: Animal Psychology or Ethology? Acta Biotheoretica 24 (3-4):86-99.
    F. J. J.Buytendijk died on October 21st 1974 at the age of 87. His important contribution to the study of animal behaviour is analyzed here in relation to the historical development of animal psychology and ethology. The detailed study of his scientific production suggests, according to the authors, that some important findings, although largely not paid attention to in present-day literature, are akin to the conceptual and methodological evolution of comparative ethology.
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  8. H. A. (2002). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (2):235-262.
    It has been argued that if an animal is psychologically like us, there may be more scientific reason to experiment upon it, but less moral justification to do so. Some scientists deny the existence of this dilemma, claiming that although there are scientifically valuable similarities between humans and animals that make experimentation worthwhile, humans are at the same time unique and fundamentally different. This latter response is, ironically, typical of pre-Darwinian beliefs in the relationship between human and non-human animals. (...)
     
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  9.  4
    M. A. Tinker (1937). The Laboratory Course in Psychology: III. Human and Animal Learning in the Maze. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (4):470.
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  10. Simon Fitzpatrick (2009). The Primate Mindreading Controversy : A Case Study in Simplicity and Methodology in Animal Psychology. In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press 224--246.
  11.  6
    T. J. Kasperbauer (forthcoming). Mentalizing Animals: Implications for Moral Psychology and Animal Ethics. Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Ethicists have tended to treat the psychology of attributing mental states to animals as an entirely separate issue from the moral importance of animals’ mental states. In this paper I bring these two issues together. I argue for two theses, one descriptive and one normative. The descriptive thesis holds that ordinary human agents use what are generally called phenomenal mental states to assign moral considerability to animals. I examine recent empirical research on the attribution of phenomenal states and agential (...)
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  12.  8
    Robert M. Yerkes (1905). Animal Psychology and Criteria of the Psychic. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (6):141-149.
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  13.  9
    Grace A. de Laguna (1918). Dualism in Animal Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (23):617-627.
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  14.  10
    Grace A. de Laguna (1919). Dualism and Animal Psychology: A Rejoinder. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (11):296-300.
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  15.  10
    Margaret Floy Washburn (1919). Dualism in Animal Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (2):41-44.
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  16.  6
    Margaret Floy Washburn (1919). Dualism in Animal Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (2):41-44.
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  17.  8
    C. O. Whitman (1899). Myths in Animal Psychology. The Monist 9 (4):524-537.
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  18.  13
    Mathias Risse (2007). Nietzschean 'Animal Psychology' Versus Kantian Ethics. In Brian Leiter & Neil Sinhababu (eds.), Nietzsche and Morality. Oxford University Press 57--82.
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  19. Wilhelm Wundt, J. E. Creighton & E. B. Titchener (1895). Lectures on Human and Animal Psychology. Philosophical Review 4 (1):90-93.
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  20.  1
    E. P. Evans (1899). Evolutional Ethics and Animal Psychology. Philosophical Review 8 (2):210-210.
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  21.  4
    David G. Stern (2004). Weininger and Wittgenstein on ‘Animal Psychology.’. In David G. Stern & Béla Szabados (eds.), Wittgenstein Reads Weininger. Cambridge University Press 169.
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  22.  6
    C. Joachim Classen (1979). Animals and Human Beings in Ancient Thought. Studies in Animal Psychology, Anthropology and Ethics. Philosophy and History 12 (1):16-17.
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  23. H. A. (2003). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33c/2 (2002), 235-261]. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):201-201.
     
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  24.  6
    D. A. H. Wilson (2003). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33C/2 (2002), 235–261]. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (1):201-.
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  25.  4
    C. Lloyd Morgan (1929). Animal Psychology for Biologists. By J. A. Bierens de Haan. (University of London Press. 1929. Pp. 80. Price 4s. 6d.). Philosophy 4 (16):573-.
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  26.  1
    No Authorship Indicated (1999). Review of Animal Models of Human Psychology: Critique of Science, Ethics, and Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):227-228.
    Reviews the book, Animal models of human psychology: Critique of science, ethics, and policy by Kenneth J. Shapiro . The principle focus of most of this text is on the present-day use of animals in psychological research. In particular, Shapiro examines contemporary animal models of eating disorders, showing how psychology came to rely so heavily on animal models in the first place and how prevalent scientific attitudes about the use of animals in the laboratory have (...)
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  27. G. W. Harris (1930). BIERENS DE HAAN, J. A. - Animal Psychology for Biologists. [REVIEW] Scientia 24 (48):349.
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  28. L. W. Kline (1899). Methods in Animal Psychology. Philosophical Review 8:433.
     
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  29. David A. H. Wilson (2002). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 33 (2):235-262.
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  30. D. A. H. Wilson (2003). Animal Psychology and Ethology in Britain and the Emergence of Professional Concern for the Concept of Ethical Cost [Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 33C/2 , 235–261]. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (1):201.
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  31. Wilhelm Wundt (1894). "Lectures on Human and Animal Psychology". Translated by J. E. Creighton and E. B. Titchener. The Monist 5:631.
     
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  32. Wilhelm Max Wundt & James Edwin Creighton (1896). Lectures on Human and Animal Psychology, Tr. By J.E. Creighton & E.B. Titchener.
     
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  33. George A. Akerlof & Robert J. Shiller (2009). Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism. Princeton University Press.
    "This book is a sorely needed corrective. Animal Spirits is an important--maybe even a decisive--contribution at a difficult juncture in macroeconomic theory.
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  34. Carol D. Raupp (2002). The "Furry Ceiling:" Clinical Psychology and Human-Animal Studies. Society and Animals 10 (4):353-360.
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  35. Kristin Andrews (2007). Critter Psychology: On the Possibility of Nonhuman Animal Folk Psychology. In Daniel D. Hutto & Matthew Ratcliffe (eds.), Folk Psychology Re-Assessed. Kluwer/Springer Press 191--209.
  36. Oskar Pfungst, C. Stumpf, Carl L. Rahn & James R. Angell (1911). Clever Hans : A Contribution to Experimental, Animal, and Human Psychology. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 8 (24):663-666.
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  37. Edwin E. Gantt (2000). Animal Models of Human Psychology: Critique of Science, Ethics, and Policy. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):227-228.
     
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  38. Juhana Toivanen (2011). Peter of John Olivi on the Psychology of Animal Action. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):413-438.
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  39. Gail F. Melson (2002). Psychology and the Study of Human-Animal Relationships. Society and Animals 10 (4):347-352.
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  40. Jim Stone (2000). Review of Eric Olson: 'The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology '. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (No. 2):495-497.
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  41.  52
    Sue-Ellen Brown (2004). The Human-Animal Bond and Self Psychology: Toward a New Understanding. Society and Animals 12 (1):67-86.
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  42. Marion Thomas (2005). Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425-460.
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  43.  7
    Denise Russell (1997). Animal Experimentation in Psychology and the Question of Scientific Merit. Ethics and the Environment 2 (1):43 - 52.
    Nonhuman animals are widely used in psychological research and the level of suffering and death is high. This is usually said to be justified by appealing to the scientific merit of the research. This article looks at notions of scientific merit, queries whether they are as clear-cut as commonly supposed, and argues that with contemporary conceptions it is too easy for any research to count as meritorious. A tightening of the notion of scientific merit is suggested, providing a ground for (...)
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  44.  3
    Christopher Andrew, Richard J. Aldrich, Wesley K. Wark Secret Intelligence & A. Reader (2011). Kevin A. Aho. Heidegger's Neglect of the Body (Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 2009), Xv+ 176 Pp. $65.00 Cloth. Kathleen Ahrens, Ed. Politics, Gender and Conceptual Metaphors (Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), Xii+ 275 Pp. Ł50. 00 Cloth. George A. Akerlof and Robert J. Shiller. Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives. [REVIEW] The European Legacy 16 (2):295-297.
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  45. Peter B. Field (1993). Animal Images in College Psychology Textbooks. Between the Species 9 (4):4.
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  46. Esther Kroeker (2011). Reid's Moral Psychology: Animal Motives as Guides to Virtue. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (Supplement 1):122-141.
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  47. Michael Quante (1999). Eric T. Olson: The Human Animal. Personal Identity Without Psychology. [REVIEW] Philosophischer Literaturanzeiger 52 (3).
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  48. Eric T. Olson (1999). The Human Animal: Personal Identity Without Psychology. Oxford University Press Usa.
    A very clear and powerfully argued defence of a most important and surprisingly neglected view."--Derek Parfit, All Souls College, Oxford. "If Dr. Olson is right, we are living animals and what goes on in our minds is wholly irrelevant to questions about our persistence through time....[Should] transform philosophical thinking about personal identity."--Peter van Inwagen, University of Notre Dame.
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  49.  66
    Gary Hatfield (2007). The Passions of the Soul and Descartes's Machine Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 38 (1):1-35.
    Descartes developed an elaborate theory of animal physiology that he used to explain functionally organized, situationally adapted behavior in both human and nonhuman animals. Although he restricted true mentality to the human soul, I argue that he developed a purely mechanistic (or material) ‘psychology’ of sensory, motor, and low-level cognitive functions. In effect, he sought to mechanize the offices of the Aristotelian sensitive soul. He described the basic mechanisms in the Treatise on man, which he summarized in the (...)
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  50.  57
    Bernard E. Rollin (2005). Reasonable Partiality and Animal Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):105 - 121.
    Moral psychology is often ignored in ethical theory, making applied ethics difficult to achieve in practice. This is particularly true in the new field of animal ethics. One key feature of moral psychology is recognition of the moral primacy of those with whom we enjoy relationships of love and friendship – philia in Aristotles term. Although a radically new ethic for animal treatment is emerging in society, its full expression is severely limited by our exploitative uses (...)
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