Search results for 'Animal rights Economic aspects' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Moral Rights (1987). Animal Liberation or Animal Rights?, Peter Singer. The Monist 70 (1).score: 870.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Cary Wolfe (2013). Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame. The University of Chicago Press.score: 424.0
    Bringing these two emergent areas of thought into direct conversation in Before the Law, Cary Wolfe fosters a new discussion about the status of nonhuman animals and the shared plight of humans and animals under biopolitics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. James R. Simpson & Bernard E. Rollin (1984). Economic Consequences of Animal Rights Programs. Journal of Business Ethics 3 (3):215 - 225.score: 342.0
    Readily available data are used to provide relevant decision making information on the highly subjective issue of animal rights. Two examples of alleged crowding; cattle being finished in concrete lots, and broilers in confined operations were evaluated to determine the impact on producers and consumers from increasing space per animal. It is concluded that similar policy changes, such as doubling floor space, can lead to dramatic differences in economic impact depending on the industry affected. It is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Steven M. Wise & Animal Rights (2004). One Step at a Time'. In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press.score: 340.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David DeGrazia (2002). Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 333.0
    This volume provides a general overview of the basic ethical and philosophical issues of animal rights. It asks questions such as: Do animals have moral rights? If so, what does this mean? What sorts of mental lives do animals have, and how should we understand welfare? By presenting models for understanding animals' moral status and rights, and examining their mental lives and welfare, David DeGrazia explores the implications for how we should treat animals in connection with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. John M. Kistler (2002). People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words. Greenwood Press.score: 333.0
    Explores the many issues surrounding the animal rights and animal welfare movements through personal interview responses from rights activists.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 333.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate to human societies (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mylan Engel (2010). The Philosophy of Animal Rights: A Brief Introduction for Students and Teachers. Lantern Books.score: 292.5
    The book also contains an extensive bibliography of references and philosophical resources.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Roger Scruton (2000). Animal Rights and Wrongs. Metro in Association with Demos.score: 292.5
    This paperback edition is fully updated with new chapters on the livestoick crisis, fishing and BSE and a layman's guide introduction to philosophical concepts, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Georges Chapouthier & Jean-Claude Nouët (eds.) (1998). The Universal Declaration of Animal Rights: Comments and Intentions. Ligue Française des Droits De L'Animal.score: 292.5
  11. Shasta Gaughen (ed.) (2005). Animal Rights. Greenhaven Press.score: 292.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 292.5
  13. A. S. Franklin, B. K. Tranter & R. D. White (2001). Explaining Support for Animal Rights: A Comparison of Two Recent Approaches to Humans, Nonhuman Animals, and Postmodernity. Society and Animals 9 (2):127-144.score: 291.0
    Questions on "animal rights" in a cross-national survey conducted in 1993 provide an opportunity to compare the applicability to this issue of two theories of the socio-political changes summed up in "postmodernity": Inglehart's (1997) thesis of "postmaterialist values" and Franklin's (1999) synthesis of theories of late modernity. Although Inglehart seems not to have addressed human-nonhuman animal relations, it is reasonable to apply his theory of changing values under conditions of "existential security" to "animal rights." Inglehart's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Stephen Thomas Newmyer (2006). Animals, Rights, and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics. Routledge.score: 270.0
    Plutarch is virtually unique in surviving classical authors in arguing that animals are rational and sentient, and in concluding that human beings must take notice of their interests. Stephen Newmyer explores Plutarch's three animal-related treatises, as well as passages from his other ethical treatises, which argue that non-human animals are rational and therefore deserve to fall within the sphere of human moral concern. Newmyer shows that some of the arguments Plutarch raises strikingly foreshadow those found in the works of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jolanta Bieliauskaitė (2012). The Impact of the Principle of Subsidiarity on the Implementation of Socio-Economic Human Rights in Lithuania: Theoretical Approach. Jurisprudence 19 (1):231-248.score: 261.0
    Globalisation, repeated economic (financial) crisis and other contemporary social processes are changing the capability of the state to provide individual social security and guarantee human rights. There is therefore a need to review social policy guidelines and their implementation measures. The problem is how to develop the social security system of state, so that human rights are not violated. For the reformation of the social security system to be consistent, it is also necessary to determine the principles (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Aneli Dragojević Mijatović (2013). Keynes' Animal Spirit. Philosophical Aspects of the Theory of John Maynard Keynes on Causes of Economic Crises and the Justification of the State Intervention. Filozofska Istraživanja 32 (3-4):557-567.score: 256.5
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.) (2008). The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 234.0
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, carefully (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. A. Yeung & H. Li (eds.) (2007). New Essays in Applied Ethics: Animal Rights, Personhood, and the Ethics of Killing. Palgrave McMillan.score: 234.0
    This collection of new essays aims to address some of the most perplexing issues arising from death and dying, as well as the moral status of persons and animals. Leading scholars, including Peter Singer and Gerald Dworkin, investigate diverse topics such as animal rights, vegetarianism, lethal injection, abortion and euthanasia.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. R. G. Frey (1980). Interests and Rights: The Case Against Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 225.0
  20. É Gocsik, H. W. Saatkamp, C. C. De Lauwere & A. G. J. M. Oude Lansink (2014). A Conceptual Approach for a Quantitative Economic Analysis of Farmers' Decision-Making Regarding Animal Welfare. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):287-308.score: 225.0
    Decisions related to animal welfare (AW) standards depend on farmer’s multiple goals and values and are constrained by a wide range of external and internal forces. The aim of this paper is twofold, i.e., (1) to develop a theoretical framework for farmers’ AW decisions that incorporates farmers’ goals, use and non-use values and (2) to present an approach to empirically implement the theoretical framework. The farmer as a head of the farm household makes choices regarding production to maximize the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Michael W. Fox (1991). Animals Have Rights, Too. Continuum.score: 225.0
  22. Michael P. T. Leahy (1994). Against Liberation: Putting Animals in Perspective. Routledge.score: 220.5
    This timely and provocative book examines the theories behind the most commonly held contemporary assumptions about animal rights. Focusing on the writings of prominent pro-liberation activists such as Peter Singer, Tom Regan and Mary Midgley, Michael P. T. Leahy argues that the animal rights movement is based upon a series of fundamental misconceptions about the basic nature of animals--beliefs which define them rationally, emotionally, and morally in too human terms. Leahy gives particular emphasis to the writings (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Rosemary Rodd (1990). Biology, Ethics, and Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 220.5
    This book utilizes both philosophical and biological approaches to address the various attitudes in the debate over animal rights. Rodd justifies ethical concern within a framework that is firmly grounded on evolutionary theory, and provides detailed discussion of practical situations in which ethical decisions have to be made. For moral philosophers, the book offers a biological background to the ethical questions involved. Biologists will find that it provides an approach to the ethics of animal rights which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Randy Malamud (1998). Reading Zoos: Representations of Animals and Captivity. New York University Press.score: 220.5
    A caged animal in the heart of the city, thousands of miles from its natural habitat, neurotically pacing in its confinement . . . Zoos offer a convenient way to indulge a cultural appetite for novelty and diversion, and to teach us, albeit superficially, about animals. Yet what, conversely, do they tell us about the people who create, maintain, and patronize them, and about animal captivity in general? Rather than foster an appreciation for the lives and attributes of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Anthony Luyirika Kafumbe (2010). Women's Rights to Property in Marriage, Divorce, and Widowhood in Uganda: The Problematic Aspects. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (2):199-221.score: 216.0
    This article examines women’s rights to property in marriage, upon divorce, and upon the death of a spouse in Uganda, highlighting the problematic aspects in both the state-made (statutory) and non-state-made (customary and religious) laws. It argues that, with the exception of the 1995 Constitution, the subordinate laws that regulate the distribution, management, and ownership of property during marriage, upon divorce, and death of a spouse are discriminatory of women. It is shown that even where the relevant statutory (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Claire Molloy (2011). Popular Media and Animals. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 216.0
    'Animals sell papers' : the value of animal stories -- Media and animal debates : welfare, rights, 'animal lovers' and terrorists -- Stars : animal performers -- Wild : authenticity and getting closer to nature -- Experimental : the visibility of experimental animals -- Farmed : selling animal products -- Hunted : recreational killing -- Monsters : horrors and moral panics -- Beginning at the end : re-imagining human-animal relations.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Kathy Rudy (2011). Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy. Univ of Minnesota Press.score: 207.0
    Machine generated contents note: ContentsIntroduction: A Change of Heart1. What's behind Animal Advocacy? -- 2. The Love of a Dog: Of Pets and Puppy Mills, Mixed-Breeds and Shelters -- 3. The Animal on Your Plate: Farmers, Vegans, and Locavores -- 4. Where the Wild Things Ought to Be: Sanctuaries, Zoos, and Exotic Pets -- 5. From Object to Subject: Animals in Scientific Research -- 6. Clothing Ourselves in Stories of Love: Affect and Animal AdvocacyConclusion: Trouble in the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Elisa Aaltola (2012). Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 207.0
    Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture explores the multifaceted moral meanings allocated to non-human suffering in contemporary Western culture.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Theofano Vetouli, Vonne Lund & Brigitte Kaufmann (2012). Farmers' Attitude Towards Animal Welfare Aspects and Their Practice in Organic Dairy Calf Rearing: A Case Study in Selected Nordic Farms. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (3):349-364.score: 207.0
    In organic philosophy, the concept of naturalness is of major importance. According to the organic interpretation of animal welfare, natural living is considered a precondition for accomplishing welfare and the principal aims of organic production include the provision of natural living conditions for animals. However, respective regulations are lacking in organic legislation. In practice, the life of a calf in organic rearing systems can deviate from being natural, since common practices in dairy farms include early weaning, dehorning, or cow-calf (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Eve Hartman (2012). Do Scientists Care About Animal Welfare? Raintree.score: 207.0
    Looks at animal welfare in society and the sciences, including laboratory animals, pets, and the effect of climate change.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Andrew Knight (2011). The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 202.5
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Marcel Dol (ed.) (1999). Recognizing the Intrinsic Value of Animals: Beyond Animal Welfare. Van Gorcum.score: 201.0
    Introduction Moral concern for animals is commonly formulated in terms of concern for their welfare. Yet, besides the welfare issue, although highly ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Greg Goodale & Jason Edward Black (eds.) (2010). Arguments About Animal Ethics. Lexington Books.score: 201.0
    The essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics, such as the campaigns waged by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (including the sexy ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Arnold Arluke (2006). Just a Dog: Understanding Animal Cruelty and Ourselves. Temple University Press.score: 198.0
    Agents: feigning authority -- Adolescents: appropriating adulthood -- Hoarders: shoring up self -- Shelter workers: finding authenticity -- Marketers: Celebrating community -- Cruelty is good to think.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Kepa Tamames (2007). Tú También Eres Un Animal. Mr.score: 198.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lori Gruen (2011). Ethics and Animals: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 189.0
    In this fresh and comprehensive introduction to animal ethics, Lori Gruen weaves together poignant and provocative case studies with discussions of ethical theory, urging readers to engage critically and empathetically reflect on our treatment of other animals. In clear and accessible language, Gruen provides a survey of the issues central to human-animal relations and a reasoned new perspective on current key debates in the field. She analyses and explains a range of theoretical positions and poses challenging questions that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Arianna Ferrari (2012). Animal Disenhancement for Animal Welfare: The Apparent Philosophical Conundrums and the Real Exploitation of Animals. A Response to Thompson and Palmer. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (1):65-76.score: 189.0
    Abstract In his paper “The Opposite of Human Enhancement: Nanotechnology and the Blind Chicken problem” ( Nanoethics 2: 305-36, 2008) Thompson argued that technological attempts to reduce or eliminate selected non-human animals’ capabilities (animal disenhancements) in order to solve or mitigate animal welfare problems in animals’ use pose a philosophical conundrum, because there is a contradiction between rational arguments in favor of these technological interventions and intuitions against them. In her response “Animal Disenhancement and the Non-Identity Problem: (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Jean Kazez (2010). Animalkind: What We Owe to Animals. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 189.0
    Introduction: Wondering in Alaska -- Before -- The myth of consent -- The order of things -- The nature of the beast -- Animal consciousness -- Dumb brutes? -- All due respect -- The lives of animals -- Caveman ethics -- Moral disorders -- Going, going, wrong -- Science and survival -- Next -- Vanishing animals -- The endless story.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Rüdiger Hahn (2012). Inclusive Business, Human Rights and the Dignity of the Poor: A Glance Beyond Economic Impacts of Adapted Business Models. Business Ethics 21 (1):47-63.score: 189.0
    In recent years, a considerable amount of research on adapted business for developing countries focused on the impact such endeavours have on the respective companies as well as on the affected people. However, the main emphasis within management sciences was on the economic outcomes or (even more distinct and often) on the question of how to integrate the poor into business models and value chains. Until now, further aspects of a dignified human existence were merely covered as a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Matthew Scully (2002). Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy. St. Martin's Press.score: 189.0
    "And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth." --Genesis 1:24-26 In this crucial passage from the Old Testament, God grants mankind power over animals. But with this privilege comes the grave responsibility to respect life, to treat animals with (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Carol J. Adams (1994). Neither Man nor Beast: Feminism and the Defense of Animals. Continuum.score: 180.0
    In just a few years, the book became an underground classic. Neither Man Nor Beast takes Adams' thought one step further.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kevin Dolan (1999). Ethics, Animals, and Science. Blackwell Science.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Thomas Ryan (2011). Animals and Social Work: A Moral Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 180.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Peter Danz (2007). Der Moralische Status von Tieren: Der Philosophische Umgang Mit Widersprüchlichen Intuitionen. Hallescher Verlag.score: 171.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Barbara De Mori (2007). Che Cos'è la Bioetica Animale. Carocci.score: 171.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Wolfgang Senz (2004). Der Inhärente Moralische Wert Nichtmenschlicher Lebewesen: Grundlagen Einer Tierethik Und Ökologischen Ethik. Lang.score: 171.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Susann Witt-Stahl (ed.) (2007). Das Steinerne Herz der Unendlichkeit Erweichen: Beiträge Zu Einer Kritischen Theorie für Die Befreiung der Tiere. Alibri.score: 171.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Uriah Kriegel (2013). Animal Rights: A Non‐Consequentialist Approach. In K. Petrus & M. Wild (eds.), Animal Minds and Animal Ethics. Transcript.score: 168.0
    It is a curious fact about mainstream discussions of animal rights that they are dominated by consequentialist defenses thereof, when consequentialism in general has been on the wane in other areas of moral philosophy. In this paper, I describe an alternative, non‐consequentialist ethical framework (combining Kantian and virtue‐ethical elements) and argue that it grants (conscious) animals more expansive rights than consequentialist proponents of animal rights typically grant. The cornerstone of this non‐consequentialist framework is the thought (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Kathryn Paxton George (1994). Discrimination and Bias in the Vegan Ideal. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):19-28.score: 166.5
    The vegan ideal is entailed by arguments for ethical veganism based on traditional moral theory (rights and/or utilitarianism) extended to animals. The most ideal lifestyle would abjure the use of animals or their products for food since animals suffer and have rights not to be killed. The ideal is discriminatory because the arguments presuppose a male physiological norm that gives a privileged position to adult, middle-class males living in industrialized countries. Women, children, the aged, and others have substantially (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Elisa Aaltola (2011). The Philosophy Behind the Movement: Animal Studies Vs. Animal Rights. Society and Animals 19 (4):393-406.score: 164.0
    Recently, many pro-animal thinkers have expressed critical views on the animal rights movement. In particular, the movement has been criticized for being philosophically uninformed, politically regressive, and practically unpersuasive. This paper investigates these criticisms and seeks to map out the philosophy behind the grassroots animal rights movement, specifically. It concludes that the criticism presented by animal studies scholars is often misplaced due to a lack of understanding of the philosophical notions within the movement, but (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000