Search results for 'Animal rights Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Moral Rights (1987). Animal Liberation or Animal Rights?, Peter Singer. The Monist 70 (1).score: 2376.0
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  2. David DeGrazia (2002). Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 1338.0
    This volume provides a general overview of the basic ethical and philosophical issues of animal rights. It asks questions such as: Do animals have moral rights? If so, what does this mean? What sorts of mental lives do animals have, and how should we understand welfare? By presenting models for understanding animals' moral status and rights, and examining their mental lives and welfare, David DeGrazia explores the implications for how we should treat animals (...)
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  3. Stephen Thomas Newmyer (2006). Animals, Rights, and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics. Routledge.score: 1299.0
    Plutarch is virtually unique in surviving classical authors in arguing that animals are rational and sentient, and in concluding that human beings must take notice of their interests. Stephen Newmyer explores Plutarch's three animal-related treatises, as well as passages from his other ethical treatises, which argue that non-human animals are rational and therefore deserve to fall within the sphere of human moral concern. Newmyer shows that some of the arguments Plutarch raises strikingly foreshadow those found in the (...)
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  4. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 1268.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate (...)
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  5. John M. Kistler (2002). People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words. Greenwood Press.score: 1158.0
    Explores the many issues surrounding the animal rights and animal welfare movements through personal interview responses from rights activists.
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  6. Cheryl E. Abbate (2014). Adventures in Moral Consistency: How to Develop an Abortion Ethic Through an Animal Rights Framework. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-20.score: 1123.2
    In recent discussions, it has been argued that a theory of animal rights is at odds with a liberal abortion policy. In response, Francione (1995) argues that the principles used in the animal rights discourse do not have implications for the abortion debate. I challenge Francione’s conclusion by illustrating that his own framework of animal rights, supplemented by a relational account of moral obligation, can address the moral issue of abortion. I first (...)
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  7. Rosemary Rodd (1990). Biology, Ethics, and Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 1108.0
    This book utilizes both philosophical and biological approaches to address the various attitudes in the debate over animal rights. Rodd justifies ethical concern within a framework that is firmly grounded on evolutionary theory, and provides detailed discussion of practical situations in which ethical decisions have to be made. For moral philosophers, the book offers a biological background to the ethical questions involved. Biologists will find that it provides an approach to the ethics of (...) rights which is rooted in biological theory. This much-needed volume will be an invaluable guide to anyone who is concerned with animal welfare. (shrink)
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  8. Mylan Engel (2010). The Philosophy of Animal Rights: A Brief Introduction for Students and Teachers. Lantern Books.score: 1092.0
    The book also contains an extensive bibliography of references and philosophical resources.
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  9. Roger Scruton (2000). Animal Rights and Wrongs. Metro in Association with Demos.score: 1092.0
    This paperback edition is fully updated with new chapters on the livestoick crisis, fishing and BSE and a layman's guide introduction to philosophical concepts, ...
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  10. Georges Chapouthier & Jean-Claude Nouët (eds.) (1998). The Universal Declaration of Animal Rights: Comments and Intentions. Ligue Française des Droits De L'Animal.score: 1092.0
  11. Shasta Gaughen (ed.) (2005). Animal Rights. Greenhaven Press.score: 1092.0
     
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  12. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 1092.0
  13. A. Yeung & H. Li (eds.) (2007). New Essays in Applied Ethics: Animal Rights, Personhood, and the Ethics of Killing. Palgrave McMillan.score: 1088.0
    This collection of new essays aims to address some of the most perplexing issues arising from death and dying, as well as the moral status of persons and animals. Leading scholars, including Peter Singer and Gerald Dworkin, investigate diverse topics such as animal rights, vegetarianism, lethal injection, abortion and euthanasia.
     
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  14. Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.) (2008). The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 997.0
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, carefully (...)
     
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  15. Greg Goodale & Jason Edward Black (eds.) (2010). Arguments About Animal Ethics. Lexington Books.score: 942.0
    The essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics, such as the campaigns waged by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (including the sexy ...
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  16. Marcel Dol (ed.) (1999). Recognizing the Intrinsic Value of Animals: Beyond Animal Welfare. Van Gorcum.score: 933.0
    Introduction Moral concern for animals is commonly formulated in terms of concern for their welfare. Yet, besides the welfare issue, although highly ...
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  17. Lori Gruen (2011). Ethics and Animals: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 922.0
    In this fresh and comprehensive introduction to animal ethics, Lori Gruen weaves together poignant and provocative case studies with discussions of ethical theory, urging readers to engage critically and empathetically reflect on our treatment of other animals. In clear and accessible language, Gruen provides a survey of the issues central to human-animal relations and a reasoned new perspective on current key debates in the field. She analyses and explains a range of theoretical positions and poses challenging questions (...)
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  18. Claire Molloy (2011). Popular Media and Animals. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 922.0
    'Animals sell papers' : the value of animal stories -- Media and animal debates : welfare, rights, 'animal lovers' and terrorists -- Stars : animal performers -- Wild : authenticity and getting closer to nature -- Experimental : the visibility of experimental animals -- Farmed : selling animal products -- Hunted : recreational killing -- Monsters : horrors and moral panics -- Beginning at the end : re-imagining human-animal relations.
     
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  19. R. G. Frey (1980). Interests and Rights: The Case Against Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 918.0
  20. Thomas Ryan (2011). Animals and Social Work: A Moral Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 918.0
     
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  21. Michael W. Fox (1991). Animals Have Rights, Too. Continuum.score: 912.0
  22. Elisa Aaltola (2012). Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 897.0
    Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture explores the multifaceted moral meanings allocated to non-human suffering in contemporary Western culture.
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  23. Michael P. T. Leahy (1994). Against Liberation: Putting Animals in Perspective. Routledge.score: 883.0
    This timely and provocative book examines the theories behind the most commonly held contemporary assumptions about animal rights. Focusing on the writings of prominent pro-liberation activists such as Peter Singer, Tom Regan and Mary Midgley, Michael P. T. Leahy argues that the animal rights movement is based upon a series of fundamental misconceptions about the basic nature of animals--beliefs which define them rationally, emotionally, and morally in too human terms. Leahy gives particular emphasis to the writings (...)
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  24. Jean Kazez (2010). Animalkind: What We Owe to Animals. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 872.0
    Introduction: Wondering in Alaska -- Before -- The myth of consent -- The order of things -- The nature of the beast -- Animal consciousness -- Dumb brutes? -- All due respect -- The lives of animals -- Caveman ethics -- Moral disorders -- Going, going, wrong -- Science and survival -- Next -- Vanishing animals -- The endless story.
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  25. Kevin Dolan (1999). Ethics, Animals, and Science. Blackwell Science.score: 868.0
     
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  26. Eve Hartman (2012). Do Scientists Care About Animal Welfare? Raintree.score: 858.0
    Looks at animal welfare in society and the sciences, including laboratory animals, pets, and the effect of climate change.
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  27. Kathy Rudy (2011). Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy. Univ of Minnesota Press.score: 852.0
    Machine generated contents note: ContentsIntroduction: A Change of Heart1. What's behind Animal Advocacy? -- 2. The Love of a Dog: Of Pets and Puppy Mills, Mixed-Breeds and Shelters -- 3. The Animal on Your Plate: Farmers, Vegans, and Locavores -- 4. Where the Wild Things Ought to Be: Sanctuaries, Zoos, and Exotic Pets -- 5. From Object to Subject: Animals in Scientific Research -- 6. Clothing Ourselves in Stories of Love: Affect and Animal AdvocacyConclusion: Trouble in the (...)
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  28. Kepa Tamames (2007). Tú También Eres Un Animal. Mr.score: 837.0
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  29. David DeGrazia (1996). Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status. Cambridge University Press.score: 812.0
    This book distinguishes itself from much of the polemical literature on these issues by offering the most judicious and well-balanced account yet available of animals' moral standing, and related questions concerning their minds and welfare. Transcending jejune debates focused on utilitarianism versus rights, the book offers a fresh methodological approach with specific and constructive conclusions about our treatment of animals. David DeGrazia provides the most thorough discussion yet of whether equal consideration should be extended to animals' interests, and (...)
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  30. Matthew Scully (2002). Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy. St. Martin's Press.score: 808.0
    "And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth." --Genesis 1:24-26 In this crucial passage from the Old Testament, God grants mankind power over animals. But with this privilege comes the grave responsibility to respect life, to treat animals with (...)
     
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  31. Cary Wolfe (2013). Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame. The University of Chicago Press.score: 798.0
    Bringing these two emergent areas of thought into direct conversation in Before the Law, Cary Wolfe fosters a new discussion about the status of nonhuman animals and the shared plight of humans and animals under biopolitics.
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  32. Jane A. Smith & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.) (1991). Lives in the Balance: The Ethics of Using Animals in Biomedical Research: The Report of a Working Party of the Institute of Medical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 768.0
    This book is the result of a three-year study undertaken by a multidisciplinary working party of the Institute of Medical Ethic (UK). The group was chaired by a moral theologian, and its members included biological and ethological scientists, toxicologists, physicians, veterinary surgeons, an expert in alternatives to animal use, officers of animal welfare organizations, a Home Office Inspector, philosophers, and a lawyer. Coming from these different backgrounds, and holding a diversity of moral views, the members produced (...)
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  33. Peter Danz (2007). Der Moralische Status von Tieren: Der Philosophische Umgang Mit Widersprüchlichen Intuitionen. Hallescher Verlag.score: 768.0
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  34. Wolfgang Senz (2004). Der Inhärente Moralische Wert Nichtmenschlicher Lebewesen: Grundlagen Einer Tierethik Und Ökologischen Ethik. Lang.score: 768.0
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  35. Barbara De Mori (2007). Che Cos'è la Bioetica Animale. Carocci.score: 762.0
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  36. Susann Witt-Stahl (ed.) (2007). Das Steinerne Herz der Unendlichkeit Erweichen: Beiträge Zu Einer Kritischen Theorie für Die Befreiung der Tiere. Alibri.score: 762.0
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  37. Shelley L. Galvin & Harold A. Herzog Jr (1992). Ethical Ideology, Animal Rights Activism, and Attitudes Toward the Treatment of Animals. Ethics and Behavior 2 (3):141 – 149.score: 708.8
    In two studies, we used the Ethics Position Questionnaire (EPQ) to investigate the relationship between individual differences in moral philosophy, involvement in the animal rights movement, and attitudes toward the treatment of animals. In the first, 600 animal rights activists attending a national demonstration and 266 nonactivist college students were given the EPQ. Analysis of the returns from 157 activists and 198 students indicated that the activists were more likely than the students to hold an (...)
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  38. Mark Rowlands (2009). Animal Rights: Moral Theory and Practice. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 690.0
    Animal rights and moral theories -- Arguing for one's species -- Utilitarianism and animals : Peter Singer's case for animal liberation -- Tom Regan : animal rights as natural rights -- Virtue ethics and animals -- Contractarianism and animal rights -- Animal minds.
     
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  39. Rosalind Hursthouse (2000). Ethics, Humans, and Other Animals: An Introduction with Readings. Routledge.score: 677.0
    Rosalind Hursthouse carefully introduces one of three standard approaches in current ethical theory: utilitarianism, rights, and virtue ethics. She then proceeds to clearly explain how each approach encourages us to think about our treatment of animals. Every chapter is linked to a reading from a key exponent of each approach. With readings from Singer, Regan and Midgley.
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  40. Christine Chwaszcza (2007). Moral Responsibility and Global Justice: A Human Rights Approach. Nomos.score: 633.6
  41. Uriah Kriegel (2013). Animal Rights: A Non‐Consequentialist Approach. In K. Petrus & M. Wild (eds.), Animal Minds and Animal Ethics. Transcript.score: 632.0
    It is a curious fact about mainstream discussions of animal rights that they are dominated by consequentialist defenses thereof, when consequentialism in general has been on the wane in other areas of moral philosophy. In this paper, I describe an alternative, non‐consequentialist ethical framework (combining Kantian and virtue‐ethical elements) and argue that it grants (conscious) animals more expansive rights than consequentialist proponents of animal rights typically grant. The cornerstone of this non‐consequentialist framework (...)
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  42. Corey Lee Wrenn (2013). Resonance of Moral Shocks in Abolitionist Animal Rights Advocacy: Overcoming Contextual Constraints. Society and Animals 21 (4):379-394.score: 595.2
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  43. Krzysztof Saja (2013). The Moral Footprint of Animal Products. Agriculture and Human Values 30 (2):193–202.score: 577.6
    Most ethical discussions about diet are focused on the justification of specific kinds of products rather than an individual assessment of the moral footprint of eating products of certain animal species. This way of thinking is represented in the typical division of four dietary attitudes. There are vegans, vegetarians, welfarists and ordinary meat-eaters. However, the common “all or nothing” discussions between meat-eaters, vegans and vegetarians bypass very important factors in assessing dietary habits. I argue that if we (...)
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  44. Aaron Garrett, Richard Dean, Humphrey Primatt, John Oswald & Thomas Young (eds.) (1713/2000). Animal Rights and Souls in the Eighteenth Century. Thoemmes Press.score: 566.4
    The publication of 'Animal Rights and Souls in the 18th Century' will be welcomed by everyone interested in the development of the modern animal liberation movement, as well as by those who simply want to savour the work of enlightenment thinkers pushing back the boundaries of both science and ethics. At last these long out-of-print texts are again available to be read and enjoyed - and what texts they are! Gems like Bougeant's witty reductio of the Christian (...)
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  45. Daniel E. Lee (2010). Human Rights and the Ethics of Globalization. Cambridge University Press.score: 561.6
    Machine generated contents note: Prologue; Part I. Philosophical Foundations: 1. Defining human rights in a coherent manner; 2. Near neighbors, distant neighbors and the ethics of globalization; 3. Ethical guidelines for business in an age of globalization; Part II. Practical Applications: 4. Human rights and the ethics of investment in China; 5. Liberia and Firestone: a case study; 6. Free trade, fair trade, and coffee farmers in Ethiopia; 7. Maquiladoras: exploitation, economic opportunity or both?; Part III. The (...)
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  46. A. M. Weisberger (2003). Animal Rights Within Judaism: The Nature of the Relationship Between Religion and Ethics. Sophia 42 (1):77-84.score: 560.8
    The general concern of the paper is to ponder whether religious views inform ethical views? This is explored through the issue of animal rights within Judaism. There is not only a great divergence, even today worldwide, on the realm of freedom that non-humans may enjoy, but historically this group of individuals has been most restricted in their behaviour, and level of value, by the Western religious worldviews. Hence it would be instructive to see to what extent an (...)
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  47. Andrew Linzey (2009). Why Animal Suffering Matters: Philosophy, Theology, and Practical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 557.6
    Introduction: Reason, ethics, and animals -- Part I: Making the rational case -- Why animal suffering matters morally -- How we minimize animal suffering and how we can change -- Part II: Three practical critiques -- First case: Hunting with dogs -- Second case: Fur farming -- Third case: Commercial sealing -- Conclusion: Re-establishing animals and children as a common cause and six objections considered.
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  48. Paola Cavalieri (2001). The Animal Question: Why Nonhuman Animals Deserve Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 542.4
    How much do animals matter--morally? Can we keep considering them as second class beings, to be used merely for our benefit? Or, should we offer them some form of moral egalitarianism? Inserting itself into the passionate debate over animal rights, this fascinating, provocative work by renowned scholar Paola Cavalieri advances a radical proposal: that we extend basic human rights to the nonhuman animals we currently treat as "things." Cavalieri first goes back in time, tracing the roots (...)
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  49. Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.score: 525.6
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  50. Jacky Turner & Joyce D'Silva (eds.) (2006). Animals, Ethics, and Trade: The Challenge of Animal Sentience. Earthscan.score: 525.6
    can be adapted and adopted by developing countries. IFC sees this as being an area where we may be able to benchmark and promote positive change. ● The force of global trade initiatives also influences animal welfare.
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