Search results for 'Animal rights Political aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Moral Rights (1987). Animal Liberation or Animal Rights?, Peter Singer. The Monist 70 (1).score: 1410.0
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  2. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 912.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate to human (...)
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  3. Hobbesian Laws, Lockean Rights & Rawlsian Ideas (2010). Ville paivansalo. In Virpi Mäkinen (ed.), The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland. 225.score: 630.0
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  4. A. S. Franklin, B. K. Tranter & R. D. White (2001). Explaining Support for Animal Rights: A Comparison of Two Recent Approaches to Humans, Nonhuman Animals, and Postmodernity. Society and Animals 9 (2):127-144.score: 580.0
    Questions on "animal rights" in a cross-national survey conducted in 1993 provide an opportunity to compare the applicability to this issue of two theories of the socio-political changes summed up in "postmodernity": Inglehart's (1997) thesis of "postmaterialist values" and Franklin's (1999) synthesis of theories of late modernity. Although Inglehart seems not to have addressed human-nonhuman animal relations, it is reasonable to apply his theory of changing values under conditions of "existential security" to "animal rights." (...)
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  5. Christiane Bailey (2013). Zoopolis. A Political Renewal of Animal Rights Theories. Dialogue:1-13.score: 508.5
    Book Panel on Zoopolis including articles by Clare Palmer, Dinesh Wadiwel and Laura Janara and a reply by Donaldson and Kymlicka.
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  6. Julian Franklin (2011). Animal Rights and Political Theory. In George Klosko (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Political Philosophy. Oup Oxford.score: 436.5
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  7. Cary Wolfe (2013). Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame. The University of Chicago Press.score: 432.0
    Bringing these two emergent areas of thought into direct conversation in Before the Law, Cary Wolfe fosters a new discussion about the status of nonhuman animals and the shared plight of humans and animals under biopolitics.
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  8. Tatjana Višak (2012). Zoopolis. A Political Theory of Animal Rights. By Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka. (Oxford UP, 2011, Pp. 329. Price $29.95.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):654-656.score: 427.5
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  9. Ruth Abbey (2013). Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka , Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 33 (6):446-448.score: 427.5
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  10. Tristan Rogers (2012). Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka. Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (4):503-510.score: 427.5
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  11. Christiane Bailey (2013). Book Symposium/Tribune du livreZoopolis, by Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012 Zoopolis: A Political Renewal of Animal Rights Theories. Dialogue:1-13.score: 427.5
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  12. Marta Tafalla (2012). Zoopolis: A Polítical Theory of Animal Rights. Dianoia 57 (69):231-237.score: 427.5
    Este artículo ofrece un análisis y un comentario general de los dieciséis estudios que componen el libro compilado por Enrique Hülsz Piccone, Nuevos ensayos sobre Heráclito, el último compendio de investigaciones sobre la filosofía del Oscuro de Efe so, donde se reúnen las actas del Segundo Symposium Heracliteum celebrado en junio de 2006 en la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la UNAM, ocasión en la que algunos de los especialistas más reconocidos de la comunidad internacional se reunieron para presentar (...)
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  13. David Macauley (1988). Political Animals: A Study of the Emerging Animal Rights Movement in the United States. Between the Species 4 (2):9.score: 427.5
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  14. Virpi Mäkinen (ed.) (2010). The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.score: 427.5
     
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  15. David DeGrazia (2002). Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 414.0
    This volume provides a general overview of the basic ethical and philosophical issues of animal rights. It asks questions such as: Do animals have moral rights? If so, what does this mean? What sorts of mental lives do animals have, and how should we understand welfare? By presenting models for understanding animals' moral status and rights, and examining their mental lives and welfare, David DeGrazia explores the implications for how we should treat animals in connection with (...)
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  16. John M. Kistler (2002). People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words. Greenwood Press.score: 414.0
    Explores the many issues surrounding the animal rights and animal welfare movements through personal interview responses from rights activists.
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  17. Brenda J. Lutz & James M. Lutz (2011). Interest Groups and Pro-Animal Rights Legislation. Society and Animals 19 (3):261-277.score: 381.0
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  18. Erin Evans (2010). Constitutional Inclusion of Animal Rights in Germany and Switzerland: How Did Animal Protection Become an Issue of National Importance? Society and Animals 18 (3):231-250.score: 376.5
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  19. Mylan Engel (2010). The Philosophy of Animal Rights: A Brief Introduction for Students and Teachers. Lantern Books.score: 373.5
    The book also contains an extensive bibliography of references and philosophical resources.
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  20. Roger Scruton (2000). Animal Rights and Wrongs. Metro in Association with Demos.score: 373.5
    This paperback edition is fully updated with new chapters on the livestoick crisis, fishing and BSE and a layman's guide introduction to philosophical concepts, ...
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  21. Georges Chapouthier & Jean-Claude Nouët (eds.) (1998). The Universal Declaration of Animal Rights: Comments and Intentions. Ligue Française des Droits De L'Animal.score: 373.5
  22. Shasta Gaughen (ed.) (2005). Animal Rights. Greenhaven Press.score: 373.5
     
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  23. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 373.5
  24. Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (2004). Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press.score: 369.0
    Cass Sunstein and Martha Nussbaum bring together an all-star cast of contributors to explore the legal and political issues that underlie the campaign for animal rights and the opposition to it. Addressing ethical questions about ownership, protection against unjustified suffering, and the ability of animals to make their own choices free from human control, the authors offer numerous different perspectives on animal rights and animal welfare. They show that whatever one's ultimate conclusions, the relationship (...)
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  25. Paul Waldau (2010). Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know. Oxford University Press.score: 369.0
    General information -- The animals themselves -- Philosophical arguments -- Laws -- Political realities -- Social realities -- Education and the arts -- Contemporary sciences -- Major figures and organizations in the animal rights movement -- The future of animal rights.
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  26. A. Yeung & H. Li (eds.) (2007). New Essays in Applied Ethics: Animal Rights, Personhood, and the Ethics of Killing. Palgrave McMillan.score: 315.0
    This collection of new essays aims to address some of the most perplexing issues arising from death and dying, as well as the moral status of persons and animals. Leading scholars, including Peter Singer and Gerald Dworkin, investigate diverse topics such as animal rights, vegetarianism, lethal injection, abortion and euthanasia.
     
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  27. Stephen Thomas Newmyer (2006). Animals, Rights, and Reason in Plutarch and Modern Ethics. Routledge.score: 309.0
    Plutarch is virtually unique in surviving classical authors in arguing that animals are rational and sentient, and in concluding that human beings must take notice of their interests. Stephen Newmyer explores Plutarch's three animal-related treatises, as well as passages from his other ethical treatises, which argue that non-human animals are rational and therefore deserve to fall within the sphere of human moral concern. Newmyer shows that some of the arguments Plutarch raises strikingly foreshadow those found in the works of (...)
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  28. Aistė Akstinienė (2013). Reservations to Human Rights Treaties: Problematic Aspects Related to Gender Issues. Jurisprudence 20 (2):451-468.score: 288.0
    In this article the author analyses specific reservations that are being done to the international documents for the protection of human rights and whether Vienna Convention on the Law of the Treaties applies to those human rights treaties or not. Also, the author analyses if reservations, which are incompatible with object and purpose of the treaty, can be done or not and what consequences they might bring. For this reason the author describes the practice of the state members (...)
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  29. Virpi Mäkinen (2010). Self-Preservation and Natural Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Political Thought. In , The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.score: 265.5
  30. R. G. Frey (1980). Interests and Rights: The Case Against Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 261.0
  31. Michael W. Fox (1991). Animals Have Rights, Too. Continuum.score: 261.0
  32. Michael E. Zimmerman (1985). The Critique of Natural Rights and the Search for a Non-Anthropocentric Basis for Moral Behavior. Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (1):43-53.score: 258.0
    MacIntyre, Clark, and Heidegger would all agree that the current problem with moral theory is its lack of a satisfactory conception of human telos. This lack leads us to resort to such fictions as rights, interests, and utility, which are “disguises for the will to power.” Ibid., p. 240. These thinkers would also agree that modern nation-states are cut off from the roots of the Western tradition. Modern political economy, with “its individualism, its acquisitiveness and its elevation of (...)
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  33. Christine M. Korsgaard, A Kantian Case for Animal Rights.score: 253.5
    Most legal systems divide the world into persons and property, treating human beings as persons, and pretty much everything else, including non-human animals, as property. Persons are the subjects of both rights and obligations, including the right to own property, while objects of property, being by their very nature for the use of persons, have no rights at all. I will call this the “legal bifurcation.” We might look to Immanuel Kant’s moral and political philosophy to provide (...)
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  34. Costas Douzinas & C. A. Gearty (eds.) (2014). The Meanings of Rights: The Philosophy and Social Theory of Human Rights. Cambridge University Press.score: 252.0
    Questioning some of the repetitive and narrow theoretical writings on rights, a group of leading intellectuals examine human rights from philosophical, theological, historical, literary and political perspectives.
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  35. Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.) (2008). The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 252.0
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, carefully (...)
     
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  36. Fernando Arlettaz (2013). Minority Rights in the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: Conceptual Considerations. Jurisprudence 20 (3):901-922.score: 239.0
    The article discusses the rights of minorities in the system of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. It establishes a conceptual distinction between universal rights, specific rights of minorities in general and specific rights of particular minorities. Universal rights correspond to all individuals (e,g,, “no one shall be subjected to torture”) or all groups of a certain class (e.g., “all families are entitled to protection”). Minority groups and their members are entitled (...)
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  37. Toma Birmontienė & Virginija Jurėnienė (2009). Development of Women's Rights in Lithuania: Recognition of Women Political Rights. Jurisprudence 116 (2):23-44.score: 239.0
    The article discusses the problems of development of women’s political rights in Lithuania in the legal historical aspect starting from the 16th century, when some property and individual rights were enshrined in the first codifications of the laws of the Great Duchy of Lithuania. The aim of the article is to show that women’s struggle for political equality and suffrage at the end of the 19th and at the turn of the 20th century correlates with the (...)
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  38. Richard Allen (2007). Some Implications Of The Political Aspects Of Personal Knowledge. Tradition and Discovery 34 (3):8-17.score: 238.5
    The political passages in Polanyi’s Personal Knowledge are an integral part of his arguments against ‘objectivism’ and/or a post-critical, personalist, fiduciary and fallibilist philosophy. This paper elaboratesthe social and political implications of Polanyi’s emphasis upon acceptance of one’s situation and the exercise in it of a sense of responsibility to transcendent ideals, as against attempts to start with a clean slate, to overcome all imperfections and to find some simple rule for political policy. Prescriptive duties and (...), and mutual trust and solidarity, are the bases of politics, anti responsible action must start with them. But much of modern politics expresses a Gnostic impatience of our created and finite existence which results in arbitrary commitment to some radical and destructive ideology. (shrink)
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  39. Stephen Cooke (forthcoming). Perpetual Strangers: Animals and the Cosmopolitan Right. Political Studies.score: 235.5
    In this article I propose a cosmopolitan approach to animal rights based upon Kant's right of universal hospitality. Many approaches to animal rights buttress their arguments by finding similarities between humans and non-human animals; in this way they represent or resemble ethics of partiality. In this article I propose an approach to animal rights that initially rejects similarity approaches and is instead based upon the adoption of a cosmopolitan mindset acknowledging and respecting difference. Furthermore, (...)
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  40. Indrė Pukanasytė (2009). Some Aspects Related to the Interpretation of the Right to Free Elections in the Case-Law of the European Court of Human Rights. Jurisprudence 115 (1):155-182.score: 234.0
    The paper focuses on the general principles established in the caselaw of the European Court of Human Rights while applying and interpreting the Article 3 of the First Protocol of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms which provides: „The High Contracting Parties undertake to hold free elections at reasonable intervals by secret ballot, under conditions which will ensure the free expression of the opinion of the people in the choice of the legislature.“ Article (...)
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  41. Matthew Scully (2002). Dominion: The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy. St. Martin's Press.score: 232.0
    "And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth." --Genesis 1:24-26 In this crucial passage from the Old Testament, God grants mankind power over animals. But with this privilege comes the grave responsibility to respect life, to treat animals with (...)
     
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  42. Michael P. T. Leahy (1994). Against Liberation: Putting Animals in Perspective. Routledge.score: 226.5
    This timely and provocative book examines the theories behind the most commonly held contemporary assumptions about animal rights. Focusing on the writings of prominent pro-liberation activists such as Peter Singer, Tom Regan and Mary Midgley, Michael P. T. Leahy argues that the animal rights movement is based upon a series of fundamental misconceptions about the basic nature of animals--beliefs which define them rationally, emotionally, and morally in too human terms. Leahy gives particular emphasis to the writings (...)
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  43. Rosemary Rodd (1990). Biology, Ethics, and Animals. Oxford University Press.score: 226.5
    This book utilizes both philosophical and biological approaches to address the various attitudes in the debate over animal rights. Rodd justifies ethical concern within a framework that is firmly grounded on evolutionary theory, and provides detailed discussion of practical situations in which ethical decisions have to be made. For moral philosophers, the book offers a biological background to the ethical questions involved. Biologists will find that it provides an approach to the ethics of animal rights which (...)
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  44. Randy Malamud (1998). Reading Zoos: Representations of Animals and Captivity. New York University Press.score: 226.5
    A caged animal in the heart of the city, thousands of miles from its natural habitat, neurotically pacing in its confinement . . . Zoos offer a convenient way to indulge a cultural appetite for novelty and diversion, and to teach us, albeit superficially, about animals. Yet what, conversely, do they tell us about the people who create, maintain, and patronize them, and about animal captivity in general? Rather than foster an appreciation for the lives and attributes of (...)
     
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  45. Elisa Aaltola (2012). Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 225.0
    Animal Suffering: Philosophy and Culture explores the multifaceted moral meanings allocated to non-human suffering in contemporary Western culture.
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  46. Kathy Rudy (2011). Loving Animals: Toward a New Animal Advocacy. Univ of Minnesota Press.score: 225.0
    Machine generated contents note: ContentsIntroduction: A Change of Heart1. What's behind Animal Advocacy? -- 2. The Love of a Dog: Of Pets and Puppy Mills, Mixed-Breeds and Shelters -- 3. The Animal on Your Plate: Farmers, Vegans, and Locavores -- 4. Where the Wild Things Ought to Be: Sanctuaries, Zoos, and Exotic Pets -- 5. From Object to Subject: Animals in Scientific Research -- 6. Clothing Ourselves in Stories of Love: Affect and Animal AdvocacyConclusion: Trouble in the (...)
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  47. Eve Hartman (2012). Do Scientists Care About Animal Welfare? Raintree.score: 225.0
    Looks at animal welfare in society and the sciences, including laboratory animals, pets, and the effect of climate change.
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  48. Uriah Kriegel (2013). Animal Rights: A Non‐Consequentialist Approach. In K. Petrus & M. Wild (eds.), Animal Minds and Animal Ethics. Transcript.score: 222.0
    It is a curious fact about mainstream discussions of animal rights that they are dominated by consequentialist defenses thereof, when consequentialism in general has been on the wane in other areas of moral philosophy. In this paper, I describe an alternative, non‐consequentialist ethical framework (combining Kantian and virtue‐ethical elements) and argue that it grants (conscious) animals more expansive rights than consequentialist proponents of animal rights typically grant. The cornerstone of this non‐consequentialist framework is the thought (...)
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  49. Claire Molloy (2011). Popular Media and Animals. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 222.0
    'Animals sell papers' : the value of animal stories -- Media and animal debates : welfare, rights, 'animal lovers' and terrorists -- Stars : animal performers -- Wild : authenticity and getting closer to nature -- Experimental : the visibility of experimental animals -- Farmed : selling animal products -- Hunted : recreational killing -- Monsters : horrors and moral panics -- Beginning at the end : re-imagining human-animal relations.
     
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  50. Marcel Dol (ed.) (1999). Recognizing the Intrinsic Value of Animals: Beyond Animal Welfare. Van Gorcum.score: 219.0
    Introduction Moral concern for animals is commonly formulated in terms of concern for their welfare. Yet, besides the welfare issue, although highly ...
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