Search results for 'Animaux Aspect moral' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rod Preece (ed.) (2002). Awe for the Tiger, Love for the Lamb: A Chronicle of Sensibility to Animals. Ubc Press.score: 180.0
    From the myths of the ancient world to the Middle Ages to Darwin and beyond, Preece captures the most telling and fascinating accounts of humankind's ...
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  2. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 180.0
  3. Caj Strandberg (2012). A Dual Aspect Account of Moral Language. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (1):87-122.score: 156.0
    It is often observed in metaethics that moral language displays a certain duality in as much as it seems to concern both objective facts in the world and subjective attitudes that move to action. In this paper, I defend The Dual Aspect Account which is intended to capture this duality: A person’s utterance of a sentence according to which φing has a moral characteristic, such as “φing is wrong,” conveys two things: The sentence expresses, in virtue of (...)
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  4. Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). The Moral Aspect of Nonmoral Goods and Evils. Utilitas 11 (01):1-15.score: 144.0
    The idea that immoral behaviour can sometimes be admirable, and that moral behaviour can sometimes be less than admirable, has led several of its supporters to infer that moral considerations are not always overriding, contrary to what has been traditionally maintained. In this paper I shall challenge this inference. My purpose in doing so is to expose and acknowledge something that has been inadequately appreciated, namely, the moral aspect of nonmoral goods and evils. I hope thereby (...)
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  5. William D. Casebeer & Patricia S. Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.score: 138.0
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need (...)
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  6. Patricia Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.score: 138.0
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need (...)
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  7. Paul Formosa (2011). Kant on the Highest Moral-Physical Good: The Social Aspect of Kant's Moral Philosophy. Kantian Review 15 (1):1-36.score: 126.0
    Kant identifies the “highest moral-physical good” as that combination of “good living” and “true humanity” which best harmonises in a “good meal in good company”. Why does Kant privilege the dinner party in this way? By examining Kant’s accounts of enlightenment, cosmopolitanism, love and respect, and gratitude and friendship, the answer to this question becomes clear. Kant’s moral ideal is that of an enlightened and just cosmopolitan human being who feels and acts with respect and love for all (...)
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  8. Andrea English (2011). Critical Listening and the Dialogic Aspect of Moral Education: J.F. Herbart's Concept of the Teacher as Moral Guide. Educational Theory 61 (2):171-189.score: 126.0
    In his central educational work, The Science of Education (1806), J.F. Herbart did not explicitly develop a theory of listening, yet his concept of the teacher as a guide in the moral development of the learner gives valuable insight into the moral dimension of listening within teacher-student interaction. Herbart's theory radically calls into question the assumed linearity between listening and obedience to external authority, not only illuminating important distinctions between socialization and education, but also underscoring consequences for our (...)
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  9. Anna Koteneva (2008). Spiritual-Moral Aspect in Investigation of Personality's Psychological Defense. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:255-262.score: 126.0
    Investigation of spiritual-moral factors of psychological defence of personality is being put in practice through Christian cognition about a man and with the help of modern psychological achievement in science. The most important spiritual factors are sin and passion. Sin is observed as one of the reasons of moral men'sdiseases, which brings to moral, psychological and body's destructions and unconscious psychological defence. Defensive mechanisms is the way to support men's sin passion, blunt conscience, keep positive illusion and (...)
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  10. I. What Admirable Immorality & Nonadmirable Morality Are (1999). The Moral Aspect of Nonmoral Goods and Evils. Utilitas 11 (1).score: 122.0
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  11. Tan Mingran (2008). A Reevaluation of Xunzi's Moral Theory From the Aspect of Mind. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):121–138.score: 120.0
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  12. Robert E. Gahringer (1954). The Metaphysical Aspect of Kant's Moral Philosopy. Ethics 64 (4):277-291.score: 120.0
  13. Charles S. Devas (1899). The Moral Aspect of Consumption. International Journal of Ethics 10 (1):41-54.score: 120.0
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  14. Reynold Jones (1980). An Aspect of Moral Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 14 (1):63–71.score: 120.0
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  15. Richard Joyce (2009). Is Moral Projectivism Empirically Tractable? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):53 - 75.score: 72.0
    Different versions of moral projectivism are delineated: minimal, metaphysical, nihilistic, and noncognitivist. Minimal projectivism (the focus of this paper) is the conjunction of two subtheses: (1) that we experience morality as an objective aspect of the world and (2) that this experience has its origin in an affective attitude (e.g., an emotion) rather than in perceptual faculties. Both are empirical claims and must be tested as such. This paper does not offer ideas on any specific test procedures, but (...)
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  16. Jocelyne Porcher (2011). Vivre Avec les Animaux: Une Utopie Pour le Xxie Siècle. Éditions la Découverte/M.A.U.S.S..score: 67.0
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  17. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Moral Responsibility and Moral Development in Epicurus’ Philosophy. In B. Reis & S. Haffmans (eds.), The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics. CUP.score: 66.0
    ABSTRACT: 1. This paper argues that Epicurus had a notion of moral responsibility based on the agent’s causal responsibility, as opposed to the agent’s ability to act or choose otherwise; that Epicurus considered it a necessary condition for praising or blaming an agent for an action, that it was the agent and not something else that brought the action about. Thus, the central question of moral responsibility was whether the agent was the, or a, cause of the action, (...)
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  18. Stephen Wilmot (2001). Corporate Moral Responsibility: What Can We Infer From Our Understanding of Organisations? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):161 - 169.score: 66.0
    The question of corporate moral responsibility – whether corporate bodies can be held morally responsible for their actions – has been debated by a number of writers since the 1970s. This discussion is intended to add to that debate, and focuses for that purpose on our understanding of the organisation. Though the integrity of the organisation has been called into question by the postmodern view of organisations, that view does not necessarily rule out the attribution of corporate agency, any (...)
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  19. Re'em Segev (forthcoming). Moral Rightness and the Significance of Law: Why, How and When Mistake of Law Matters. University of Toronto Law Journal, Forthcoming.score: 66.0
    The question of whether a mistake of law should negate or mitigate criminal liability is commonly considered to be pertinent to the culpability of the agent, often examined in light of the (epistemic) reasonableness of the mistake. I argue that this view disregards an important aspect of this question, namely whether a mistake of law affects the rightness of the action, particularly in light of the moral significance of the mistake. I argue that several plausible premises, regarding (...) rightness under uncertainty, the nature of law and the moral significance of law, entail a positive answer to this question. Specifically, I consider this argument: (1) one (subjective) sense of moral rightness depends on the (epistemically justified) belief of the agent concerning a non-moral fact that is morally significant; (2) a law is (partly) a non-moral fact; (3) a legal fact might be morally significant; (4) therefore an action that is compatible with an applicable moral standard, in light of the mistaken (justified) belief of the agent concerning a morally significant law, is (subjectively) right or less wrongful; (5) the (subjective) moral rightness of an action counts against criminal liability for this action; (6) therefore an action that is compatible with the applicable moral standard, in light of the mistaken (epistemically justified) belief of the agent, counts against criminal liability for the action if the law is morally significant. (shrink)
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  20. W. Scott Clifton (2013). Murdochian Moral Perception. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (3):207-220.score: 66.0
    There has been a recent surge of interest in the moral philosophy of Iris Murdoch. One issue that has arisen is whether her view advocates a form of moral perception. In this paper I argue that her view does indeed advocate for a form of moral perception—what I call weak moral perception. In the process of moral reasoning weak moral perception plays a preparatory role for moral judgment, which means that moral judgment (...)
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  21. Martien A. M. Pijnenburg & Bert Gordijn (2005). Identity and Moral Responsibility of Healthcare Organizations. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (2):141-160.score: 66.0
    In this paper the moral responsibility of a Healthcare Organization (HCO) is conceived as an inextricable aspect of the identity of the HCO. We attempt to show that by exploring this relation a more profound insight in moral responsibility can be gained. Referring to Charles Taylor we explore the meaning of the concept of identity. It consists of three interdependent dimensions: a moral, a dialogical, and a narrative one. In section two we develop some additional arguments (...)
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  22. L. V. Brettler (1975). Blumberg on Moral Criticism. Mind 84 (336):579-582.score: 66.0
    D. Blumbergi identifies three kinds of moral criticism: (i) of an individual for violating a moral practice in his society, (2) of a moral practice but not the individual who participates in it, and (3) of both an individual and the practice in accordance with which he acts ('practice- personal' criticism) (p. 348). According to Mr. Blumberg, successful derivation of a conclusive 'ought'-statement from statements about socially-created obligations would show how moral criticisms of type 1 are (...)
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  23. Tom Kitwood (1978). The Morality of Inter‐Personal Perspectives: An Aspect of Values in Adolescent Life. Journal of Moral Education 7 (3):189-198.score: 66.0
    Abstract A code of conduct relevant to relationships in mid?adolescence is described, together with an outline of the method by which it was abstracted from interview data. Some comments on the character and significance of the code are offered.
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  24. François Tanguay-Renaud (2013). Victor's Justice: The Next Best Moral Theory of Criminal Punishment? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 32 (1):129-157.score: 66.0
    In this essay, I address one methodological aspect of Victor Tadros's The Ends of Harm-­-­namely, the moral character of the theory of criminal punishment it defends. First, I offer a brief reconstruction of this dimension of the argument, highlighting some of its distinctive strengths while drawing attention to particular inconsistencies. I then argue that Tadros ought to refrain from developing this approach in terms of an overly narrow understanding of the morality of harming as fully unified and reconciled (...)
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  25. Heiko Spitzeck (2009). Organizational Moral Learning: What, If Anything, Do Corporations Learn From Ngo Critique? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):157 - 173.score: 66.0
    While organizational learning literature has generated significant insight into the effective and efficient achievement of organizational goals as well as to the modus of learning, it is currently unable to describe moral learning processes in organizations consistently. Corporations need to learn morally if they want to deal effectively with stakeholders criticizing their conduct. Nongovernmental organizations do not ask corporations to be more effective or efficient in what they do, but to become more responsible or to learn morally. Current research (...)
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  26. Elise Springer (2013). Communicating Moral Concern: An Ethics of Critical Responsiveness. The Mit Press.score: 66.0
    Examines the social aspect of moral agency, building an account of critical engagement that focuses on the transformation of moral attention through communicative exchange, rather than on matters of judgment or on behavioral outcomes.
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  27. Antoine C. Dussault (2013). In Search of Ecocentric Sentiments: Insights From the CAD Model in Moral Psychology. Environmental Ethics 35 (4):419-437.score: 66.0
    One aspect of J. Baird Callicott’s foundational project for ecocentrism consists in explaining how moral consideration for ecological wholes can be grounded in moral sentiments. Some critics of Callicott have objected that moral consideration for ecological wholes is impossible under a sentimentalist conception of ethics because, on both Hume and Smith’s views, sympathy is our main moral sentiment and it cannot be elicited by holistic entities. This conclusion is premature. The relevant question is not whether (...)
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  28. Marga Reimer (2010). Moral Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Cluster B Personality Disorders. Neuroethics 3 (2):173-184.score: 62.0
    Medical professionals, including mental health professionals, largely agree that moral judgment should be kept out of clinical settings. The rationale is simple: moral judgment has the capacity to impair clinical judgment in ways that could harm the patient. However, when the patient is suffering from a "Cluster B" personality disorder, keeping moral judgment out of the clinic might appear impossible, not only in practice but also in theory. For the diagnostic criteria associated with these particular disorders (Antisocial, (...)
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  29. Joshua Knobe & Ben Fraser (2008). Causal Judgment and Moral Judgment: Two Experiments. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology. MIT Press.score: 60.0
    It has long been known that people’s causal judgments can have an impact on their moral judgments. To take a simple example, if people conclude that a behavior caused the death of ten innocent children, they will therefore be inclined to regard the behavior itself as morally wrong. So far, none of this should come as any surprise. But recent experimental work points to the existence of a second, and more surprising, aspect of the relationship between causal judgment (...)
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  30. Jan-Willem van der Rijt (2011). Coercive Interference and Moral Judgment. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (5):549-567.score: 60.0
    Coercion is by its very nature hostile to the individual subjected to it. At the same time, it often is a necessary evil: political life cannot function without at least some instances of coercion. Hence, it is not surprising that coercion has been the topic of heated philosophical debate for many decades. Though numerous accounts have been put forth in the literature, relatively little attention has been paid to the question what exactly being subjected to coercion does to an individual (...)
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  31. Shira Haviv & Patrick J. Leman (2002). Moral Decision-Making in Real Life: Factors Affecting Moral Orientation and Behaviour Justification. Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):121-140.score: 60.0
    The study addresses two separate but related issues in connection with people's real-life moral decisions and judgements. First, the notion of moral orientation is examined in terms of its consistency across varying contexts, its relation to gender and to gender role. Secondly, a new aspect of moral reasoning is explored--the influence on moral decision-making of considering the consequences of an action. Fifty-eight undergraduate students were asked to discuss two personal and two impersonal real-life moral (...)
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  32. Sharon Lamb (1997). Sex Education as Moral Education: Teaching for Pleasure, About Fantasy, and Against Abuse. Journal of Moral Education 26 (3):301-315.score: 60.0
    Abstract This paper argues for an integration of moral education and sex education curricula. In such an integration, the primary values that would be taught would not be those relating to specific sexual behaviour but those relating to the general treatment of human beings, suggesting that sex that involves coercion or exploitation as well as sex that causes harm is wrong. Sex educators must take as their goal the prevention of abuse, not by placing responsibility on girls to avoid (...)
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  33. Yonah Matemba (2010). Continuity and Change in the Development of Moral Education in Botswana. Journal of Moral Education 39 (3):329-343.score: 60.0
    This article traces the development of moral education (ME) in Botswana from pre?colonial times to the present day. It shows how during this time ME has undergone three distinct phases of development, each emphasising a particular ideology. In pre?colonial times ME was offered as part of indigenous education in the home and community, both formally and informally, directly and indirectly. During the missionary/colonial period (1870s?1966) and in the first three decades of Botswana?s independence (1967?1998), ME was taught in the (...)
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  34. Ann Dummett (1986). Race, Culture and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 15 (1):10-15.score: 60.0
    Abstract Current debate on race, culture, religion and moral education is often bogged down in abstract definition and theoretical arguments, leading away from, instead of towards, practical action. Sometimes the false formulation of abstractions leads to misplaced actions. Where moral education is concerned, the great need at present is to look at general moral standards and arguments first, and apply these to behaviour affecting racial inequality, rather than to start from a concentration on racism, working back towards (...)
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  35. Mal Leicester & Richard Pearce (1997). Cognitive Development, Self Knowledge and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 26 (4):455-472.score: 60.0
    Abstract This paper rejects the notion of moral education in adulthood as merely remedial, i.e. as providing a second chance to learn that which should have been learned in school, or as merely compensatory, i.e. as making up for the waning of our cognitive abilities which (stereotypically) occurs with age. Rather, it advocates a conception of lifelong moral education which presupposes that there are social and cognitive features of maturity which have the potential to generate some worthwhile learning (...)
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  36. Klaus Issler & Ted W. Ward (1989). Moral Development as a Curriculum Emphasis in American Protestant Theological Education. Journal of Moral Education 18 (2):131-143.score: 60.0
    Abstract The study was an exploratory investigation of the contribution that graduate seminary curriculum (broadly conceived) makes to the moral development of Protestant ministerial students, as perceived by faculty. Personal interviews were conducted with 24 faculty members from six midwestern Protestant denominational graduate schools of theology. Clusters of faculty responses identified five factors which influence students? moral development: 1. challenging and diverse off?campus field and work experiences; 2. personal example of faculty and close faculty?student relationships; 3. sustaining a (...)
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  37. Hongmei Qu (2011). Marxism and Morality: Reflections on the History of Interpreting Marx in Moral Philosophy. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):239-257.score: 58.0
    The well-known paradox between Marxism and morality is that on the one hand, Marx claims that morality is a form of ideology that should be abandoned, while on the other hand, Marx makes quite a few moral judgments in his writings. It is in the research after Marx’s death that the paradox is found, explored and solved. This paper surveys the history of interpreting Marx from the aspect of moral philosophy by dividing it into three sequential phases. (...)
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  38. Tvrtko Jolic (2014). Climate Change and Human Moral Enhancement. In Mladen Domazet & Dinka Marinovic Jerolimov (eds.), Sustainability Perspectives from the European Semi-periphery. Institute for social research. 79-91.score: 58.0
    In this article I discuss a recent proposal according to which human beings are in need of moral enhancement by novel biomedical means in order to reduce the risk of catastrophes that could threaten the very possibility of continued human existence on this planet. I raise two objections to this proposal. The first objection claims that the idea that human beings could be morally enhanced by altering our emotional psychological inclinations, such as altruism, is misguided. In the line with (...)
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  39. Oleg Sergeevich Pugachev (1996). The Problem of Moral Absolutes in the Ethics of Vladimir Solov'ëv. Studies in East European Thought 48 (2-4):207 - 221.score: 58.0
    Moral absolutes were perceived, by Solov'ëv, in a dual manner: a) from the side of content, of psychology, as when we speak of feelings, emotions, etc.; and b) under a formal aspect, as “ideas,” i.e. logically. Neither of these can be treated without relating to moral absolutes astrue, and without a rationalbelief in their truth, a truth that cannot be logically proved. In my opinion, our time has become keenly aware of the universally human value of Vladimir (...)
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  40. Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.score: 56.0
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  41. Erick Fabris (2011). Tranquil Prisons: Chemical Incarceration Under Community Treatment Orders. University of Toronto Press.score: 56.0
    Chemical incarceration -- Restraints and treatment -- On the ground -- Authorization : psychiatric history and law -- Biocarceration -- Transinstitutionalization -- Dreams of escape -- In the present.
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  42. Roger Hutchinson (2008/2009). Ethical Choices in a Pluralistic World. Chester Ronning Centre for the Study of Religion and Public Life.score: 56.0
    Doing ethics in a pluralistic world -- Ethical issues for religion in Canada.
     
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  43. Debra A. Shogan (ed.) (1992). A Reader in Feminist Ethics. Canadian Scholars' Press.score: 56.0
     
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  44. Matthew Kieran (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Art, Morality and Ethics: On the (Im)Moral Character of Art Works and Inter-Relations to Artistic Value. Philosophy Compass 5 (5):426-431.score: 54.0
    Up until fairly recently it was philosophical orthodoxy – at least within analytic aesthetics broadly construed – to hold that the appreciation and evaluation of works as art and moral considerations pertaining to them are conceptually distinct. However, following on from the idea that artistic value is broader than aesthetic value, the last 15 years has seen an explosion of interest in exploring possible inter-relations between the appreciative and ethical character of works as art. Consideration of these issues has (...)
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  45. David W. Shoemaker (2011). Psychopathy, Responsibility, and the Moral/Conventional Distinction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):99-124.score: 54.0
    In this paper, I attempt to show that the moral/conventional distinction simply cannot bear the sort of weight many theorists have placed on it for determining the moral and criminal responsibility of psychopaths. After revealing the fractured nature of the distinction, I go on to suggest how one aspect of it may remain relevant—in a way that has previously been unappreciated—to discussions of the responsibility of psychopaths. In particular, after offering an alternative explanation of the available data (...)
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  46. Joshua M. Glasgow (2003). Expanding the Limits of Universalization: Kant's Duties and Kantian Moral Deliberation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (1):23 - 47.score: 54.0
    Despite all the attention given to Kant’s universalizability tests, one crucial aspect of Kant’s thought is often overlooked. Attention to this issue, I will argue, helps us resolve two serious problems for Kant’s ethics. Put briefly, the first problem is this: Kant, despite his stated intent to the contrary, doesn’t seem to use universalization in arguing for duties to oneself, and, anyway, it is not at all clear why duties to oneself should be grounded on a procedure that envisions (...)
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  47. Uriah Kriegel (2013). Moral Phenomenology. In Hugh LaFolette (ed.), International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Blackwell.score: 54.0
    In the philosophy of mind, the study of mental life has tended to focus on three central aspects of mental states: their representational content, their functional role, and their phenomenal character. The representational content of a mental state is what the state represents, what it is about; its functional role is the role it plays within the functional organization of the subject’s overall psychology; its phenomenal character is the experiential or subjective quality that goes with what it is like, from (...)
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  48. Mordechai Kremnitzer & Re'em Segev (2000). The Legality of Interrogational Torture: A Question of Proper Authorization or a Substantive Moral Issue. Israel Law Review 34 (2):509-559.score: 54.0
    The article explores the Israeli Supreme Court main judgment regarding the legality of the use of special interrogation methods in order extract information concerning future acts of terror. The Judgment's main conclusion was that while there might be a justification for using exceptional interrogation measures in order to save lives, based on the concept of lesser evil as embedded in the criminal defense of necessity, the government is nevertheless not authorized to use such means in the absence of explicit legislation (...)
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  49. Anders Schinkel (2011). Huck Finn, Moral Language and Moral Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (3):511-525.score: 54.0
    The aim of this article is twofold. Against the traditional interpretation of ‘the conscience of Huckleberry Finn’ (for which Jonathan Bennett's article with this title is the locus classicus) as a conflict between conscience and sympathy, I propose a new interpretation of Huck's inner conflict, in terms of Huck's mastery of (the) moral language and its integration with his moral feelings. The second aim is to show how this interpretation can provide insight into a particular aspect of (...)
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  50. Páll S. Ardal (1977). Another Look at Hume's Account of Moral Evaluation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (4).score: 54.0
    I MAKE NO APOLOGIES for writing about this well-worn topic. For, although there has been an enormous amount written about the account Hume gives of the nature of moral evaluation, commentators are as far from agreement as ever. My own contribution to the controversy has, if anything, not only added to the variety of opinions but also has increased the general confusion. For this I must accept some responsibility. I have certainly laid myself open to some misinterpretation, and the (...)
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