Search results for 'Animaux Aspect moral' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Rod Preece (ed.) (2002). Awe for the Tiger, Love for the Lamb: A Chronicle of Sensibility to Animals. Ubc Press.score: 60.0
    From the myths of the ancient world to the Middle Ages to Darwin and beyond, Preece captures the most telling and fascinating accounts of humankind's ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Alan Herscovici (1985/1991). Second Nature: The Animal-Rights Controversy. Stoddart.score: 60.0
  3. Caj Strandberg (2012). A Dual Aspect Account of Moral Language. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (1):87-122.score: 54.0
    It is often observed in metaethics that moral language displays a certain duality in as much as it seems to concern both objective facts in the world and subjective attitudes that move to action. In this paper, I defend The Dual Aspect Account which is intended to capture this duality: A person’s utterance of a sentence according to which φing has a moral characteristic, such as “φing is wrong,” conveys two things: The sentence expresses, in virtue of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Michael J. Zimmerman (1999). The Moral Aspect of Nonmoral Goods and Evils. Utilitas 11 (01):1-15.score: 48.0
    The idea that immoral behaviour can sometimes be admirable, and that moral behaviour can sometimes be less than admirable, has led several of its supporters to infer that moral considerations are not always overriding, contrary to what has been traditionally maintained. In this paper I shall challenge this inference. My purpose in doing so is to expose and acknowledge something that has been inadequately appreciated, namely, the moral aspect of nonmoral goods and evils. I hope thereby (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. William D. Casebeer & Patricia S. Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.score: 45.0
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Patricia Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.score: 45.0
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Paul Formosa (2011). Kant on the Highest Moral-Physical Good: The Social Aspect of Kant's Moral Philosophy. Kantian Review 15 (1):1-36.score: 39.0
    Kant identifies the “highest moral-physical good” as that combination of “good living” and “true humanity” which best harmonises in a “good meal in good company”. Why does Kant privilege the dinner party in this way? By examining Kant’s accounts of enlightenment, cosmopolitanism, love and respect, and gratitude and friendship, the answer to this question becomes clear. Kant’s moral ideal is that of an enlightened and just cosmopolitan human being who feels and acts with respect and love for all (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Andrea English (2011). Critical Listening and the Dialogic Aspect of Moral Education: J.F. Herbart's Concept of the Teacher as Moral Guide. Educational Theory 61 (2):171-189.score: 39.0
    In his central educational work, The Science of Education (1806), J.F. Herbart did not explicitly develop a theory of listening, yet his concept of the teacher as a guide in the moral development of the learner gives valuable insight into the moral dimension of listening within teacher-student interaction. Herbart's theory radically calls into question the assumed linearity between listening and obedience to external authority, not only illuminating important distinctions between socialization and education, but also underscoring consequences for our (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Anna Koteneva (2008). Spiritual-Moral Aspect in Investigation of Personality's Psychological Defense. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 20:255-262.score: 39.0
    Investigation of spiritual-moral factors of psychological defence of personality is being put in practice through Christian cognition about a man and with the help of modern psychological achievement in science. The most important spiritual factors are sin and passion. Sin is observed as one of the reasons of moral men'sdiseases, which brings to moral, psychological and body's destructions and unconscious psychological defence. Defensive mechanisms is the way to support men's sin passion, blunt conscience, keep positive illusion and (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. I. What Admirable Immorality & Nonadmirable Morality Are (1999). The Moral Aspect of Nonmoral Goods and Evils. Utilitas 11 (1).score: 37.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Tan Mingran (2008). A Reevaluation of Xunzi's Moral Theory From the Aspect of Mind. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):121–138.score: 36.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert E. Gahringer (1954). The Metaphysical Aspect of Kant's Moral Philosopy. Ethics 64 (4):277-291.score: 36.0
  13. Charles S. Devas (1899). The Moral Aspect of Consumption. International Journal of Ethics 10 (1):41-54.score: 36.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Reynold Jones (1980). An Aspect of Moral Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 14 (1):63–71.score: 36.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Richard Joyce (2009). Is Moral Projectivism Empirically Tractable? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):53 - 75.score: 30.0
    Different versions of moral projectivism are delineated: minimal, metaphysical, nihilistic, and noncognitivist. Minimal projectivism (the focus of this paper) is the conjunction of two subtheses: (1) that we experience morality as an objective aspect of the world and (2) that this experience has its origin in an affective attitude (e.g., an emotion) rather than in perceptual faculties. Both are empirical claims and must be tested as such. This paper does not offer ideas on any specific test procedures, but (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.score: 28.0
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Erick Fabris (2011). Tranquil Prisons: Chemical Incarceration Under Community Treatment Orders. University of Toronto Press.score: 28.0
    Chemical incarceration -- Restraints and treatment -- On the ground -- Authorization : psychiatric history and law -- Biocarceration -- Transinstitutionalization -- Dreams of escape -- In the present.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Roger Hutchinson (2008/2009). Ethical Choices in a Pluralistic World. Chester Ronning Centre for the Study of Religion and Public Life.score: 28.0
    Doing ethics in a pluralistic world -- Ethical issues for religion in Canada.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Debra A. Shogan (ed.) (1992). A Reader in Feminist Ethics. Canadian Scholars' Press.score: 28.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Susanne Bobzien (2006). Moral Responsibility and Moral Development in Epicurus’ Philosophy. In B. Reis & S. Haffmans (eds.), The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics. CUP.score: 27.0
    ABSTRACT: 1. This paper argues that Epicurus had a notion of moral responsibility based on the agent’s causal responsibility, as opposed to the agent’s ability to act or choose otherwise; that Epicurus considered it a necessary condition for praising or blaming an agent for an action, that it was the agent and not something else that brought the action about. Thus, the central question of moral responsibility was whether the agent was the, or a, cause of the action, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Stephen Wilmot (2001). Corporate Moral Responsibility: What Can We Infer From Our Understanding of Organisations? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):161 - 169.score: 27.0
    The question of corporate moral responsibility – whether corporate bodies can be held morally responsible for their actions – has been debated by a number of writers since the 1970s. This discussion is intended to add to that debate, and focuses for that purpose on our understanding of the organisation. Though the integrity of the organisation has been called into question by the postmodern view of organisations, that view does not necessarily rule out the attribution of corporate agency, any (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Marga Reimer (2010). Moral Aspects of Psychiatric Diagnosis: The Cluster B Personality Disorders. Neuroethics 3 (2):173-184.score: 27.0
    Medical professionals, including mental health professionals, largely agree that moral judgment should be kept out of clinical settings. The rationale is simple: moral judgment has the capacity to impair clinical judgment in ways that could harm the patient. However, when the patient is suffering from a "Cluster B" personality disorder, keeping moral judgment out of the clinic might appear impossible, not only in practice but also in theory. For the diagnostic criteria associated with these particular disorders (Antisocial, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Re'em Segev (forthcoming). Moral Rightness and the Significance of Law: Why, How and When Mistake of Law Matters. University of Toronto Law Journal, Forthcoming.score: 27.0
    The question of whether a mistake of law should negate or mitigate criminal liability is commonly considered to be pertinent to the culpability of the agent, often examined in light of the (epistemic) reasonableness of the mistake. I argue that this view disregards an important aspect of this question, namely whether a mistake of law affects the rightness of the action, particularly in light of the moral significance of the mistake. I argue that several plausible premises, regarding (...) rightness under uncertainty, the nature of law and the moral significance of law, entail a positive answer to this question. Specifically, I consider this argument: (1) one (subjective) sense of moral rightness depends on the (epistemically justified) belief of the agent concerning a non-moral fact that is morally significant; (2) a law is (partly) a non-moral fact; (3) a legal fact might be morally significant; (4) therefore an action that is compatible with an applicable moral standard, in light of the mistaken (justified) belief of the agent concerning a morally significant law, is (subjectively) right or less wrongful; (5) the (subjective) moral rightness of an action counts against criminal liability for this action; (6) therefore an action that is compatible with the applicable moral standard, in light of the mistaken (epistemically justified) belief of the agent, counts against criminal liability for the action if the law is morally significant. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. W. Scott Clifton (2013). Murdochian Moral Perception. Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (3):207-220.score: 27.0
    There has been a recent surge of interest in the moral philosophy of Iris Murdoch. One issue that has arisen is whether her view advocates a form of moral perception. In this paper I argue that her view does indeed advocate for a form of moral perception—what I call weak moral perception. In the process of moral reasoning weak moral perception plays a preparatory role for moral judgment, which means that moral judgment (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Martien A. M. Pijnenburg & Bert Gordijn (2005). Identity and Moral Responsibility of Healthcare Organizations. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (2):141-160.score: 27.0
    In this paper the moral responsibility of a Healthcare Organization (HCO) is conceived as an inextricable aspect of the identity of the HCO. We attempt to show that by exploring this relation a more profound insight in moral responsibility can be gained. Referring to Charles Taylor we explore the meaning of the concept of identity. It consists of three interdependent dimensions: a moral, a dialogical, and a narrative one. In section two we develop some additional arguments (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. François Tanguay-Renaud (2013). Victor's Justice: The Next Best Moral Theory of Criminal Punishment? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 32 (1):129-157.score: 27.0
    In this essay, I address one methodological aspect of Victor Tadros's The Ends of Harm-­-­namely, the moral character of the theory of criminal punishment it defends. First, I offer a brief reconstruction of this dimension of the argument, highlighting some of its distinctive strengths while drawing attention to particular inconsistencies. I then argue that Tadros ought to refrain from developing this approach in terms of an overly narrow understanding of the morality of harming as fully unified and reconciled (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. L. V. Brettler (1975). Blumberg on Moral Criticism. Mind 84 (336):579-582.score: 27.0
    D. Blumbergi identifies three kinds of moral criticism: (i) of an individual for violating a moral practice in his society, (2) of a moral practice but not the individual who participates in it, and (3) of both an individual and the practice in accordance with which he acts ('practice- personal' criticism) (p. 348). According to Mr. Blumberg, successful derivation of a conclusive 'ought'-statement from statements about socially-created obligations would show how moral criticisms of type 1 are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Heiko Spitzeck (2009). Organizational Moral Learning: What, If Anything, Do Corporations Learn From Ngo Critique? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):157 - 173.score: 27.0
    While organizational learning literature has generated significant insight into the effective and efficient achievement of organizational goals as well as to the modus of learning, it is currently unable to describe moral learning processes in organizations consistently. Corporations need to learn morally if they want to deal effectively with stakeholders criticizing their conduct. Nongovernmental organizations do not ask corporations to be more effective or efficient in what they do, but to become more responsible or to learn morally. Current research (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Laurie Shrage (1994). Moral Dilemmas of Feminism: Prostitution, Adultery, and Abortion. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Sharge explores the moral pemises of feminist sexual politics, focusing in particular on the emotive issues of abortion, prostitution and adultery, in order to develop an interpretative and pluralist approach to feminist ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Christopher Grau (2010). Moral Status, Speciesism, and Liao’s Genetic Account. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (3):387-96.score: 24.0
    This paper offers several criticisms of the account of rightholding laid out in S. Matthew Liao’s recent paper “The Basis of Human Moral Status.” I argue that Liao’s account both does too much and too little: it grants rightholder status to those who may not deserve it, and it does not provide grounds for offering such status to those who arguably do deserve it. Given these troubling aspects of his approach, I encourage Liao to abandon his “physical basis of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Joshua Knobe & Ben Fraser (2008). Causal Judgment and Moral Judgment: Two Experiments. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology. MIT Press.score: 24.0
    It has long been known that people’s causal judgments can have an impact on their moral judgments. To take a simple example, if people conclude that a behavior caused the death of ten innocent children, they will therefore be inclined to regard the behavior itself as morally wrong. So far, none of this should come as any surprise. But recent experimental work points to the existence of a second, and more surprising, aspect of the relationship between causal judgment (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Hanno Sauer (2012). Psychopaths and Filthy Desks: Are Emotions Necessary and Sufficient for Moral Judgment? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):95-115.score: 24.0
    Philosophical and empirical moral psychologists claim that emotions are both necessary and sufficient for moral judgment. The aim of this paper is to assess the evidence in favor of both claims and to show how a moderate rationalist position about moral judgment can be defended nonetheless. The experimental evidence for both the necessity- and the sufficiency-thesis concerning the connection between emotional reactions and moral judgment is presented. I argue that a rationalist about moral judgment can (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make justice, not simply peace among (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. F. M. Kamm (1992). Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Based on a non-consequentialist ethical theory, this book critically examines the prevalent view that if a fetus has the moral standing of a person, it has a right to life and abortion is impermissible. Most discussion of abortion has assumed that this view is correct, and so has focused on the question of the personhood of the fetus. Kamm begins by considering in detail the permissibility of killing in non-abortion cases which are similar to abortion cases. She goes on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Philippa Foot (2002). Moral Dilemmas and Other Topics in Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Moral Dilemmas is the second volume of collected essays by the eminent moral philosopher Philippa Foot, gathering the best of her work from the late 1970s to the 1990s. It fills the gap between her famous 1978 collection Virtues and Vice (now reissued) and her acclaimed monograph Natural Goodness, published in 2001. In this new collection, Professor Foot develops further her critique of the dominant ethical theories of the last fifty years, and discusses such topics as the nature (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Wayne Christensen & John Sutton (2012). Reflections on Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning Toward an Integrated, Multidisciplinary Approach to Moral Cognition. In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.), Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. Psychology Press. 327-347.score: 24.0
    B eginning with the problem of integrating diverse disciplinary perspectives on moral cognition, we argue that the various disciplines have an interest in developing a common conceptual framework for moral cognition research. We discuss issues arising in the other chapters in this volume that might serve as focal points for future investigation and as the basis for the eventual development of such a framework. These include the role of theory in binding together diverse phenomena and the role of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Sidney Axinn (2009). A Moral Military. Temple University Press.score: 24.0
    In this new edition of the classic book on the moral conduct of war, Sidney Axinn provides a full-length treatment of the military conventions from a ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David DeGrazia (1996). Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book distinguishes itself from much of the polemical literature on these issues by offering the most judicious and well-balanced account yet available of animals' moral standing, and related questions concerning their minds and welfare. Transcending jejune debates focused on utilitarianism versus rights, the book offers a fresh methodological approach with specific and constructive conclusions about our treatment of animals. David DeGrazia provides the most thorough discussion yet of whether equal consideration should be extended to animals' interests, and examines (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John Deigh (1996). The Sources of Moral Agency: Essays in Moral Psychology and Freudian Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The essays in this collection are concerned with the psychology of moral agency. They focus on moral feelings and moral motivation, and seek to understand the operations and origins of these phenomena as rooted in the natural desires and emotions of human beings. An important feature of the essays, and one that distinguishes the book from most philosophical work in moral psychology, is the attention to the writings of Freud. Many of the essays draw on Freud's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Neil Levy (2011). Hard Luck: How Luck Undermines Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The concept of luck has played an important role in debates concerning free will and moral responsibility, yet participants in these debates have relied upon an intuitive notion of what luck is. Neil Levy develops an account of luck, which is then applied to the free will debate. He argues that the standard luck objection succeeds against common accounts of libertarian free will, but that it is possible to amend libertarian accounts so that they are no more vulnerable to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. H. E. Mason (ed.) (1996). Moral Dilemmas and Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This collection of previously unpublished essays addresses a number of issues arising out of philosophical controversies over the possibility of genuine moral dilemmas. Issues addressed include the form of a moral dilemma; the paradoxes a moral dilemma is said to entail; the question of whether a moral dilemma must exhibit inconsistency; the role of intractable circumstances in occasioning moral dilemmas; and the plausibility of supposing that there might be rational ways of addressing moral dilemmas (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Thomas Nadelhoffer, Eddy A. Nahmias & Shaun Nichols (eds.) (2010). Moral Psychology: Historical and Contemporary Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 24.0
    Moral Psychology: Historical and Contemporary Readings is the first book to bring together the most significant contemporary and historical works on the topic from both philosophy and psychology. Provides a comprehensive introduction to moral psychology, which is the study of psychological mechanisms and processes underlying ethics and morality Unique in bringing together contemporary texts by philosophers, psychologists and other cognitive scientists with foundational works from both philosophy and psychology Approaches moral psychology from an empirically informed perspective Explores (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jamie Mayerfeld (1999). Suffering and Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    In this work, Jamie Mayerfeld undertakes a careful inquiry into the meaning and moral significance of suffering. Understanding suffering in hedonistic terms as an affliction of feeling, he claims that it is an objective psychological condition, amenable to measurement and interpersonal comparison, although its accurate assessment is never easy. Mayerfeld goes on to examine the content of the duty to prevent suffering and the weight it has relative to other moral considerations. He argues that the prevention of suffering (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.score: 24.0
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ted Lockhart (2000). Moral Uncertainty and its Consequences. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    We are often uncertain how to behave morally in complex situations. In this controversial study, Ted Lockhart contends that moral philosophy has failed to address how we make such moral decisions. Adapting decision theory to the task of decision-making under moral uncertainly, he proposes that we should not always act how we feel we ought to act, and that sometimes we should act against what we feel to be morally right. Lockhart also discusses abortion extensively and proposes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. John Michael Doris (2010). The Moral Psychology Handbook. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The Moral Psychology Handbook offers a survey of contemporary moral psychology, integrating evidence and argument from philosophy and the human sciences.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Howard Cohen (1991). Power and Restraint: The Moral Dimension of Police Work. Praeger.score: 24.0
    This book uses a moral perspective grounded in the social contract to define the responsibilities assumed by the police.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. David Carr (2002). Feelings in Moral Conflict and the Hazards of Emotional Intelligence. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):3-21.score: 24.0
    From some perspectives, it seems obvious that emotions and feelings must be both reasonable and morally significant: from others, it may seem as obvious that they cannot be. This paper seeks to advance discussion of ethical implications of the currently contested issue of the relationship of reason to feeling and emotion via reflection upon various examples of affectively charged moral dilemma. This discussion also proceeds by way of critical consideration of recent empirical enquiry into these issues in the literature (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jan-Willem van der Rijt (2011). Coercive Interference and Moral Judgment. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (5):549-567.score: 24.0
    Coercion is by its very nature hostile to the individual subjected to it. At the same time, it often is a necessary evil: political life cannot function without at least some instances of coercion. Hence, it is not surprising that coercion has been the topic of heated philosophical debate for many decades. Though numerous accounts have been put forth in the literature, relatively little attention has been paid to the question what exactly being subjected to coercion does to an individual (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Christopher W. Gowans (1994). Innocence Lost: An Examination of Inescapable Moral Wrongdoing. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Our lives are such that moral wrongdoing is sometimes inescapable for us. We have moral responsibilities to persons which may conflict and which it is wrong to violate even when they do conflict. Christopher W. Gowans argues that we must accept this conclusion if we are to make sense of our moral experience and the way in which persons are valuable to us. In defending this position, he critically examines the recent moral dilemmas debate. He maintains (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000