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  1. Kenneth W. Goodman & Anita Cava (2008). Bioethics, Business Ethics, and Science: Bioinformatics and the Future of Healthcare. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):361-372.
    The intersection of ethics, computing, and genetics plots a space not yet adequately mapped, despite its importance, indeed, its rapidly growing importance. Its subdomains are well-enough known: or the study of ethical issues in genetics and genomics, is part of core curricula everywhere. Ethics and computing is an established subfield. Computing and geneticshas in little more than a decade progressed from subsubspecialty to the sine qua non of contemporary biomedical research, and it bids fair to transform clinical practice. We must (...)
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  2. Charles D. Mitchell, F. Daniel Armstrong, Kenneth W. Goodman & Anita Cava (2008). Disclosure of HIV Status to an Infected Child: Medical, Psychological, Ethical, and Legal Perspectives in an Era of" Super-Vertical" Transmission. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (1):43.
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  3. Anita Cava & Don Mayer (2007). Integrative Social Contract Theory and Urban Prosperity Initiatives. Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):263 - 278.
    Urban communities in 21st century America are facing severe economic challenges, ones that suggest a mandate to contemplate serious changes in the way America does business. The middle class is diminishing in many parts of the country, with consequences for the economy as a whole. When faced with the loss of its economic base, any business community must make some difficult decisions about its proper role and responsibilities. Decisions to support the community must be balanced alongside and against responsibilities to (...)
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  4. Anita Cava (1995). Social Contract Theory and Gender Discrimination. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):257-270.
    This paper relates Donaldson and Dunfee’s Integrative Social Contracts Theory to the problem of gender discrimination. We make the assumption that multinational managers might seek some guidance from ISCT to resolve ethical issues of gender discrimination in countries indifferent or hostile to gender equaIity. The role of Donaldson and Dunfee’s “hypernorms” seems especially cruciaI, and we find that, under their writings thus far, no “hypernorms” exist to make unethical the most blatant acts of sex discrimination in a host country whose (...)
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  5. Don Mayer & Anita Cava (1993). Ethics and the Gender Equality Dilemma for U.S. Multinationals. Journal of Business Ethics 12 (9):701 - 708.
    U.S. multinational enterprises must now follow the policies of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in their overseas operations, at least with respect to U.S. expatriate employees. Doing so in a culture which discourages gender equality in the workplace raises difficult issues, both practically and ethically. Vigorously importing U.S. attitudes toward gender-equality into a social culture such as Japan or Saudi Arabia may seem ethnocentric, a version of ethical imperialism. Yet adapting to host country norms risks a (...)
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