16 found
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Ann J. Cahill [16]Ann Joy Cahill [1]
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Profile: Ann Cahill (Elon College)
  1.  31
    Ann J. Cahill (2001). Rethinking Rape. Cornell University Press.
    Rape, claims Ann J. Cahill, affects not only those women who are raped, but all women who experience their bodies as rapable and adjust their actions and self-images accordingly. Rethinking Rape counters legal and feminist definitions of rape as mere assault and decisively emphasizes the centrality of the body and sexuality in a crime which plays a crucial role in the continuing oppression of women.
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  2. Ann J. Cahill (2011). Overcoming Objectification. Routledge.
    Objectification is a foundational concept in feminist theory, used to analyze such disparate social phenomena as sex work, representation of women's bodies, and sexual harassment. However, there has been an increasing trend among scholars of rejecting and re-evaluating the philosophical assumptions which underpin it. In this work, Cahill suggests an abandonment of the notion of objectification, on the basis of its dependence on a Kantian ideal of personhood. Such an ideal fails to recognize sufficiently the role the body plays in (...)
     
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  3. Ann J. Cahill (2001). The Play of Reason: From the Modern to the Postmodern (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (4):308-311.
  4.  31
    Ann J. Cahill & Stephen Bloch-Schulman (2012). Argumentation Step-By-Step. Teaching Philosophy 35 (1):41-62.
    In this paper, we offer a method of teaching argumentation that consists of students working through a series of cumulative, progressive steps at their own individual pace—a method inspired by martial arts pedagogy. We ground the pedagogy in two key concepts from the scholarship of teaching and learning: “deliberate practice” and “deep approaches to learning.” The step-by-step method, as well as the challenges it presents, is explained in detail. We also suggest ways that this method might be adapted for other (...)
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  5. Ann J. Cahill (2000). Foucault, Rape, and the Construction of the Feminine Body. Hypatia 15 (1):43-63.
    : In 1977, Michel Foucault suggested that legal approaches to rape define it as merely an act of violence, not of sexuality, and therefore not distinct from other types of assaults. I argue that rape can not be considered merely an act of violence because it is instrumental in the construction of the distinctly feminine body. Insofar as the threat of rape is ineluctably, although not determinately, associated with the development of feminine bodily comportment, rape itself holds a (...)
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  6.  76
    Ann J. Cahill (2003). Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification. Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    : This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's (...)
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  7.  55
    Ann J. Cahill (2011). In Defense of Self-Defense. Philosophical Papers 38 (3):363-380.
    Some feminist theorists have argued that emphasizing women's self-defense mistakenly emphasizes women's behavior and choices rather than male aggression as a cause of sexual violence. I argue here that such critiques of self-defense are misguided, and do not sufficiently take into account the ways in which feminist self-defense courses can constitute embodied transformations of the meanings of femininity and rape. While certainly not sufficient to counter a rape culture by themselves, self-defense courses should remain a crucial element in feminist anti-rape (...)
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  8.  23
    Ann J. Cahill (2014). Recognition, Desire, and Unjust Sex. Hypatia 29 (2):303-319.
    In this article I will revisit the question of what I term the continuum of heteronormative sexual interactions, that is, the idea that purportedly ethically acceptable heterosexual interactions are conceptually, ethically, and politically associated with instances of sexual violence. Spurred by recent work by psychologist Nicola , I conclude that some of my earlier critiques of Catharine MacKinnon's theoretical linkages between sexual violence and normative heterosex are wanting. In addition, neither MacKinnon's theory nor my critique of it seem up to (...)
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  9.  11
    Ann J. Cahill (2014). The Difference Sameness Makes: Objectification, Sex Work, and Queerness. Hypatia 29 (4):840-856.
    With its implicit vilification of materiality, the notion of objectification has failed to produce a coherent and effective ethical analysis of heterosexual sex work. The concept of derivatization, grounded in an Irigarayan model of embodied intersubjectivity, is more effective. However, queer sex work poses new and different ethical challenges. This paper argues that although queer sex work can entail both objectification and derivatization, the former is not ethically objectionable, and the latter, although the cause for some justified ethical concern, must (...)
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  10.  2
    Ann J. Cahill (2000). Foucault, Rape, and the Construction of the Feminine Body. Hypatia 15 (1):43-63.
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  11.  32
    Ann J. Cahill (2010). Getting to My Fighting Weight. Hypatia 25 (2):485 - 492.
  12.  3
    Ann J. Cahill, Kathryn J. Norlock & Byron J. Stoyles (2015). Editors' Introduction. Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):1-8.
    Existing accounts of meaning in reproductive contexts, especially those put forward in debates concerning abortion, tend to focus on the (moral) status of the fetus. This issue on miscarriage, pregnancy loss, and fetal death accomplishes a shift this conversation, in the direction of pushing past embryo-centric value judgments. To put it bluntly, the miscarried embryo is not the one who has to live with the experience. The essays in this special issue are a significant addition to the scarce literature on (...)
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  13.  21
    Ann J. Cahill, Continental Feminism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  14.  2
    Ann J. Cahill (2015). Miscarriage and Intercorporeality. Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):44-58.
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  15.  9
    Ann J. Cahill (2001). On Feminist Ethics and Politics. Teaching Philosophy 24 (2):178-181.
  16. Ann J. Cahill (2003). Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification. Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.