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  1. Ann Margaret Sharp (2008). Philosophizing About Our Emotions in the Classroom. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 27:89-99.
    The classroom community of inquiry aims at helping children make better judgments. If we can show that emotions are judgments or appraisals, it follows that they are educable. Such education of the emotions optimally should take place within the environment of communal inquiry with its focus on respect for persons, dialogue, concept formation, critical, creative and caring thinking. Children need help learning to identify their emotions, detecting assumptions upon which they lie and justifying these emotions to themselves and to others. (...)
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  2. Ann Margaret Sharp (2004). And the Children Shall Lead Them. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (2):177-187.
    Philosophy for Children engages students in philosophical deliberation characterized by dialogue, inquiry, reasoning and self-reflection. Philosophy for Children assumes a pluralistic conception of philosophy which, when practiced in a community of inquiry with children, is a necessary tool for the liberation from oppression. It is on this basis that an analogous relationship with feminist philosophy is established. Students of Philosophy for Children commit themselves, either consciously or unconsciously, to such principles as egalitarianism, respect for persons, fallibilism, pluralism, open-mindedness, tolerance, and (...)
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  3. Ann Margaret Sharp (1997). The Aesthetic Dimension of the Community of Inquiry. Inquiry 17 (1):67-77.
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  4. Ann Margaret Sharp (1996). Self-Transformation in the Community of Inquiry. Inquiry 16 (1):36-47.
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  5. Ann Margaret Sharp (1995). Letter-Writing. Inquiry 14 (3):54-63.
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  6. Ann Margaret Sharp (1992). Women, Children and the Evolution of Philosophy for Children. In Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.), Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Temple University Press.
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  7. Ann Margaret Sharp, Ronald F. Reed & Matthew Lipman (eds.) (1992). Studies in Philosophy for Children: Harry Stottlemeier's Discovery. Temple University Press.
    In this first part, Matthew Lipman offers the reader a glimpse at the thought processes that resulted in Philosophy for Children and, in so doing, ...
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  8. Ann Margaret Sharp (1988). Critical Thinking and Communities of Inquiry. Inquiry 1 (3):6-6.
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  9. Ann Margaret Sharp (1988). Sharp, From P. 6. Inquiry 1 (3):9-10.
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  10. Ann Margaret Sharp (1987). Pedagogical Practice and Philosophy. Philosophy Today 31 (1):82-89.
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  11. Ann Margaret Sharp (1987). What is a 'Community of Inquiry'? Journal of Moral Education 16 (1):37-45.
    Abstract When we speak about the aim of doing philosophy on the elementary school level with children as transforming classrooms into ?communities of inquiry?, we make certain assumptions about nature and personhood and the relationship between the two. We also make certain assumptions about dialogue, truth and knowledge. Further, we make assumptions regarding the ability of children to form such communities that will engender care for one another as persons with rights, a tolerance for each other's views, feelings, imaginings, creations (...)
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  12. Ann Margaret Sharp (1986). Is There an Essence of Education? Journal of Moral Education 15 (3):189-196.
  13. Ann Margaret Sharp (1984). Philosophical Teaching as Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 13 (1):3-8.
    Abstract Moral education at its most effective is philosophical education conducted at the elementary school level within the context of classroom communities of inquiry. Such an education assumes that children are thinking persons and given the right environment and the right teacher, they can learn to do philosophy with integrity and can discuss ethical issues in a thoughtful, objective and reasonable manner. Participation in such a community of inquiry over many years can afford children opportunities to inculcate procedures of inquiry (...)
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  14. Ann Margaret Sharp (1982). Kierkegaard's Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 5 (4):329-330.
  15. Ann Margaret Sharp (1981). Children's Intellectual Liberation. Educational Theory 31 (2):197-214.
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  16. Matthew Lipman & Ann Margaret Sharp (1980). Can Moral Education Be Divorced From Philosophical Inquiry? In George S. Maccia (ed.), On Teaching Philosophy. School of Education, Indiana University.
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  17. Matthew Lipman & Ann Margaret Sharp (eds.) (1978). Growing Up with Philosophy. Temple University Press.
     
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  18. Ann Margaret Sharp (1978). Simone Weil on Friendship. Philosophy Today 22 (4):266-275.
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