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  1. Ann Taves (2009). BRIDGING SCIENCE AND RELIGION: “THE MORE” AND “THE LESS” IN WILLIAM JAMES AND OWEN FLANAGAN. Zygon 44 (1):9-17.
     
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  2. Ann Taves (2009). Bridging Science and Religion: "The More" and "the Less" in William James and Owen Flanagan. Zygon 44 (1):9-17.
    There is a kinship between Owen Flanagan's The Really Hard Problem and William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience that not only can help us to understand Flanagan's book but also can help scholars, particularly scholars of religion, to be attentive to an important development in the realm of the "spiritual but not religious." Specifically, Flanagan's book continues a tradition in philosophy, exemplified by James, that addresses questions of religious or spiritual meaning in terms accessible to a broad audience outside (...)
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  3. Ann Taves (2009). Religious Experience Reconsidered: A Building Block Approach to the Study of Religion and Other Special Things. Princeton University Press.
    I don't know of any other book like it."--Wayne Proudfoot, Columbia University "This is a terrific book. -/- The essence of religion was once widely thought to be a unique form of experience that could not be explained in neurological, psychological, or sociological terms. In recent decades scholars have questioned the privileging of the idea of religious experience in the study of religion, an approach that effectively isolated the study of religion from the social and natural sciences. Religious Experience Reconsidered (...)
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  4. Ann Taves (2009). Rereading the Varieties of Religious Experience in Transatlantic Perspective. Zygon 44 (2):415-432.
    William James's The Varieties of Religious Experience is one of the world's most popular attempts to meld science and religion. Academic reviews of the book were mixed in Europe and America, however, and prominent contemporaries, unsure whether it was science or theology, struggled to interpret it. James's reliance on an inherently ambiguous understanding of the subconscious as a means of bridging between religion and science accounts for some of the interpretive difficulties, but it does not explain why his overarching question (...)
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