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Profile: Anna Carastathis (California State University, Los Angeles)
  1. Anna Carastathis (2014). Reinvigorating Intersectionality as a Provisional Concept. In Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donovan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering and Chatto. 59-70.
    Challenging the triumphal narrative of ‘political completion’ that surrounds intersectionality--as ‘the’ way to theorize the relationship among systems of oppression--and which helps to cement the impression of mainstream feminism’s arrival at a postracial moment, I argue we should instead approach intersectionality as a ‘provisional concept’ which disorients entrenched essentialist cognitive habits. Rather than assume that ‘intersectionality’ has a stable, positive definition, I suggest intersectionality anticipates rather than delivers the normative or theoretical goals often imputed to it.
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  2. Anna Carastathis (2014). The Concept of Intersectionality in Feminist Theory. Philosophy Compass 9 (5):304-314.
    In feminist theory, intersectionality has become the predominant way of conceptualizing the relation between systems of oppression which construct our multiple identities and our social locations in hierarchies of power and privilege. The aim of this essay is to clarify the origins of intersectionality as a metaphor, and its theorization as a provisional concept in Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw’s work, followed by its uptake and mainstreaming as a paradigm by feminist theorists in a period marked by its widespread and rather unquestioned--if, (...)
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  3. Anna Carastathis (2013). Basements and Intersections. Hypatia 28 (4):698-715.
    In this paper, I revisit Kimberlé Crenshaw's argument in “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex” (1989) to recover a companion metaphor that has been largely forgotten in the “mainstreaming” of intersectionality in (white-dominated) feminist theory. In addition to the now-famous intersection metaphor, Crenshaw offers the basement metaphor to show how—by privileging monistic, mutually exclusive, and analogically constituted categories of “race” and “sex” tethered, respectively, to masculinity and whiteness—antidiscrimination law functions to reproduce social hierarchy, rather than to remedy it, denying (...)
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  4. Anna Carastathis (2013). Identity Categories as Potential Coalitions. Signs 38 (4):941-965.
    Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw ends her landmark essay “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence against Women of Color” with a normative claim about coalitions. She suggests that we should reconceptualize identity groups as “in fact coalitions,” or at least as “potential coalitions waiting to be formed.” In this essay, I explore this largely overlooked claim by combining philosophical analysis with archival research I conducted at the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Historical Society Archive in San Francisco about Somos Hermanas, (...)
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  5. Anna Carastathis (2012). Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America. Symposium 16 (1):250-256.
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  6. Anna Carastathis (2012). Review of 'Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America' by Ladelle McWhorter. [REVIEW] Symposium 16 (1):250-256.
  7. Anna Carastathis (2010). Fanon on Turtle Island: Revisiting the Question of Violence. In Elizabeth A. Hoppe & Tracey Nicholls (eds.), Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy. Lexington (Rowman & Littlefield). 77.
    In this chapter, I explore the role of violence in colonial rule and its role in decolonization struggle by posing the question, “what is alive in Fanon’s thought?” What can Fanon tell us about white settler state power and Fourth World decolonization struggles? I explore the relevance of Fanon’s account to the ongoing colonial situation on the northern part of Anówara Kawennote (Turtle Island), occupied by Canada. In this analysis, I am informed by Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) political philosopher Taiaiake Alfred. I (...)
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  8. Mireille Fanon-Mendès France, Anna Carastathis, Nigel C. Gibson, Lewis R. Gordon, Peter Gratton, Ferit Güven, Mireille Fanon Mendès-France, Marilyn Nissim-Sabat, Olúfémi Táíwò, Mohammad H. Tamdgidi, Chloë Taylor & Sokthan Yeng (2010). Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy. Lexington Books.
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  9. Anna Carastathis (2009). A Phenomenology of Fetishism. International Studies in Philosophy 39 (2):17-33.
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  10. Anna Carastathis (2009). Material Feminisms. Symposium 13 (1):141-143.
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  11. Anna Carastathis, Feminism and the Political Economy of Representation : Intersectionality, Invisibility and Embodiment.
    It has become commonplace within feminist theory to claim that women's lives are constructed by multiple, intersecting systems of oppression. In this thesis, l challenge the consensus that oppression is aptly captured by the theoretical model of "intersectionality." While intersectionality originates in Black feminist thought as a purposive intervention into US antidiscrimination law, it has been detached from that context and harnessed to different representational aims. For instance, it is often asserted that intersectionality enables a representational politics that overcomes legacies (...)
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  12. Anna Carastathis (2007). A Phenomenology of Fetishism: Alienated Production and the Appearance of 'Race'. International Studies in Philosophy 39 (2):17-33.