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Anna M. Borghi [17]Anna Maria Borghi [1]
  1. Anna M. Borghi & Angelo Cangelosi (2014). Action and Language Integration: From Humans to Cognitive Robots. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (2).
    The topic is characterized by a highly interdisciplinary approach to the issue of action and language integration. Such an approach, combining computational models and cognitive robotics experiments with neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, and linguistic approaches, can be a powerful means that can help researchers disentangle ambiguous issues, provide better and clearer definitions, and formulate clearer predictions on the links between action and language. In the introduction we briefly describe the papers and discuss the challenges they pose to future research. We identify (...)
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  2. Sinan Kalkan, Nilgün Dag, Onur Yürüten, Anna M. Borghi & Erol Şahin (2014). Verb Concepts From Affordances. Interaction Studies 15 (1):1-37.
    In this paper, we investigate how the interactions of a robot with its environment can be used to create concepts that are typically represented by verbs in language. Towards this end, we utilize the notion of affordances to argue that verbs typically refer to the generation of a specific type of effect rather than a specific type of action. Then, we show how a robot can form these concepts through interactions with the environment and how humans can use these concepts (...)
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  3. Giuseppe Morlino, Claudia Gianelli, Anna M. Borghi & Stefano Nolfi (2014). Learning to Manipulate and Categorize in Human and Artificial Agents. Cognitive Science 38 (5):n/a-n/a.
    This study investigates the acquisition of integrated object manipulation and categorization abilities through a series of experiments in which human adults and artificial agents were asked to learn to manipulate two-dimensional objects that varied in shape, color, weight, and color intensity. The analysis of the obtained results and the comparison of the behavior displayed by human and artificial agents allowed us to identify the key role played by features affecting the agent/environment interaction, the relation between category and action development, and (...)
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  4. Corrado Roversi, Anna M. Borghi & Luca Tummolini (2013). A Marriage is an Artefact and Not a Walk That We Take Together: An Experimental Study on the Categorization of Artefacts. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):527-542.
    Artefacts are usually understood in contrast with natural kinds and conceived as a unitary kind. Here we propose that there is in fact a variety of artefacts: from the more concrete to the more abstract ones. Moreover, not every artefact is able to fulfil its function thanks to its physical properties: Some artefacts, particularly what we call “institutional” artefacts, are symbolic in nature and require a system of rules to exist and to fulfil their function. Adopting a standard method to (...)
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  5. Luca Tummolini, Claudia Scorolli & Anna M. Borghi (2013). Disentangling the Sense of Ownership From the Sense of Fairness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (1):101-102.
    Both evolutionary and developmental research indicate that humans are adapted to respecting property rights, independently (and possibly orthogonally) of considerations of fairness. We offer evidence from psychological experiments suggesting that enforcing one's rights and respecting others' possessions are basic cognitive mechanisms automatically activated and grounded in humans' sensory-motor system. This may entail an independent motivation that is more profound than considerations of fairness and impartiality.
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  6. Ettore Ambrosini, Claudia Scorolli, Anna M. Borghi & Marcello Costantini (2012). Which Body for Embodied Cognition? Affordance and Language Within Actual and Perceived Reaching Space. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1551-1557.
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  7. Filomena Anelli, Anna M. Borghi & Roberto Nicoletti (2012). Grasping the Pain: Motor Resonance with Dangerous Affordances. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1627-1639.
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  8. Pierre O. Jacquet, Alessia Tessari, Ferdinand Binkofski & Anna M. Borghi (2012). Can Object Affordances Impact on Human Social Learning of Tool Use? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):227-228.
    The author describes and sociocognitive skills that he argues as being necessary for tool use. We propose that those skills could be based on simpler detection systems humans could share with other animal tool users. More specifically, we discuss the impact of object affordances on the understanding and the social learning of tool use.
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  9. Marco Tullio Liuzza, Annalisa Setti & Anna M. Borghi (2012). Kids Observing Other Kids' Hands: Visuomotor Priming in Children. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):383-392.
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  10. Anna M. Borghi & Diane Pecher (2011). Introduction to the Special Topic Embodied and Grounded Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  11. Bernhard Hommel, Lorenza S. Colzato, Claudia Scorolli, Anna M. Borghi & Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg (2011). Religion and Action Control: Faith-Specific Modulation of the Simon Effect but Not Stop-Signal Performance. Cognition 120 (2):177-185.
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  12. Mariagrazia Ranzini, Luisa Lugli, Filomena Anelli, Rossella Carbone, Roberto Nicoletti & Anna M. Borghi (2011). Graspable Objects Shape Number Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:147.
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  13. Claudia Scorolli, Ferdinand Binkofski, Giovanni Buccino, Roberto Nicoletti, Lucia Riggio & Anna Maria Borghi (2011). Abstract and Concrete Sentences, Embodiment, and Languages. Frontiers in Psychology 2.
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  14. Lorenza S. Colzato, Ilja van Beest, Wery P. M. van den Wildenberg, Claudia Scorolli, Shirley Dorchin, Nachshon Meiran, Anna M. Borghi & Bernhard Hommel (2010). God: Do I Have Your Attention? Cognition 117 (1):87-94.
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  15. Doreen Jirak, Mareike M. Menz, Giovanni Buccino, Anna M. Borghi & Ferdinand Binkofski (2010). Grasping Language – A Short Story on Embodiment☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):711-720.
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  16. Anna M. Borghi & Felice Cimatti (2009). Words as Tools and the Problem of Abstract Words Meanings. In. In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. 31--2304.
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  17. Alessia Tessari & Anna M. Borghi (2007). Body Image and Body Schema: The Shared Representation of Body Image and the Role of Dynamic Body Schema in Perspective and Imitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):221-222.
    Our commentary addresses two issues that are not developed enough in the target article. First, the model does not clearly address the distinction among external objects, external body parts, and internal bodies. Second, the authors could have discussed further the role of body schema with regard to its dynamic character, and its role in perspective and in imitation.
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  18. Domenico Parisi, Anna M. Borghi, Andrea Di Ferdinando & Giorgio Tsiotas (2005). Meaning and Motor Actions: Artificial Life and Behavioral Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):139-140.
    Mirror neurons may play a role in representing not only signs but also their meaning. Because actions are the only aspect of behavior that are inter-individually accessible, interpreting meanings in terms of actions might explain how meanings can be shared. Behavioral evidence and artificial life simulations suggest that seeing objects or processing words referring to objects automatically activates motor actions.
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