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  1. Anna Moltchanova (forthcoming). Cooperation in the We-Mode and Immigrant Inclusion. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-14.
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  2. Anna Moltchanova (2013). Group Intentions and Oppression. Philosophy 88 (01):81-100.
    A reductive theory of collective intentionality would imply that the ‘official’ intentions of an oppressive political authority cannot be constructed from the intentions of individuals when they follow the authority's rules. This makes it difficult to explain the unraveling of official group plans through time in a seemingly consistent fashion, and the corresponding source of coercion. A non-reductive theory, on the other hand, cannot capture whether the actions of individuals in an oppressive society are free or coerced, so long as (...)
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  3. Anna Moltchanova (2011). The General Will and Immigration. Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (2):132-152.
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  4. Anna Moltchanova (2010). The Birthright Lottery: Citizenship and Global Inequality ‐ by Ayelet Shachar. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (4):431-433.
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  5. Anna Moltchanova (2010). The Birthright Lottery: Citizenship and Global Inequality, Ayelet Shachar (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2009), 290 Pp., $39.95 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 24 (4):431-433.
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  6. Anna Moltchanova (2009). Collective Agents and Group Moral Rights. Journal of Political Philosophy 17 (1):23-46.
  7. Anna Moltchanova (2008). Group Membership and Morally Risky Epistemic Conditions. Social Philosophy Today 24:53-67.
    Johann Gottlieb Fichte argues that one semantic presupposition of claims about our entitlements is the idea that others are capable of autonomy. Individuals cannot demand anything from others, even submission, unless they also presuppose—although perhaps without acknowledging this to themselves—that others are free agents. Thus, the autonomy of others is a pre-condition of our exercise of autonomy. Why do individuals and groups often try to justify their own entitlement to rights at the expense of the freedom of others, thereby simultaneously (...)
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  8. Anna Moltchanova (2007). Nationhood and Political Culture. Journal of Social Philosophy 38 (2):255–273.
  9. Anna Moltchanova (2005). Stateless National Groups, International Justice and Asymmetrical Warfare. Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (2):194–215.
  10. Anna Moltchanova (2001). The Basic Principles of the International Legal System and Self-Determination of National Groups. Dissertation, Mcgill University (Canada)
    This thesis demonstrates that by redefining the notion of nationhood and by treating nations and national minorities equally with respect to self-determination, it is possible to formulate basic principles of the international legal system, which would promote territorial integrity and stability of multinational states better than the existing system. I demonstrate that theories dealing with self-determination based solely on human rights or cases of secession address the problem with inadequate tools. I also show that minority-rights approaches do not accommodate self-determination (...)
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