Search results for 'Anne Aimola Davies' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Martin Davies, Anne Aimola Davies & Max Coltheart (2005). Anosognosia and the Two-Factor Theory of Delusions. Mind and Language 20 (2):241-57.
    Anosognosia is literally ‘unawareness of or failure to acknowledge one’s hemi- plegia or other disability’ (OED). Etymology would suggest the meaning ‘lack of knowledge of disease’ so that anosognosia would include any denial of impairment, such as denial of blindness (Anton’s syndrome). But Babinski, who introduced the term in 1914, applied it only to patients with hemiplegia who fail to acknowledge their paralysis. Most commonly, this is failure to acknowledge paralysis of the left side of the body following damage to (...)
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  2.  26
    Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies & Martin Davies (2011). Two Hands Are Better Than One: A New Assessment Method and a New Interpretation of the Non-Visual Illusion of Self-Touch. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):956-964.
    A simple experimental paradigm creates the powerful illusion that one is touching one’s own hand even when the two hands are separated by 15 cm. The participant uses her right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner provides identical stimulation to the participant’s receptive left hand. Change in felt position of the receptive hand toward the prosthetic hand has previously led to the interpretation that the participant experiences self-touch at the location of the prosthetic hand, and (...)
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  3.  13
    Anne M. Aimola Davies, Rebekah C. White & Martin Davies (2013). Spatial Limits on the Nonvisual Self-Touch Illusion and the Visual Rubber Hand Illusion: Subjective Experience of the Illusion and Proprioceptive Drift. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):613-636.
    The nonvisual self-touch rubber hand paradigm elicits the compelling illusion that one is touching one’s own hand even though the two hands are not in contact. In four experiments, we investigated spatial limits of distance and alignment on the nonvisual self-touch illusion and the well-known visual rubber hand illusion. Common procedures and common assessment methods were used. Subjective experience of the illusion was assessed by agreement ratings for statements on a questionnaire and time of illusion onset. The nonvisual self-touch illusion (...)
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  4. Anne M. Aimola Davies & Davies & Martin (2009). Explaining Pathologies of Belief. In Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (eds.), Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience: Philosophical Perspectives. OUP Oxford
  5.  7
    Anne M. Aimola Davies, Stephen Waterman, Rebekah C. White & Martin Davies (2013). When You Fail to See What You Were Told to Look For: Inattentional Blindness and Task Instructions. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):221-230.
    Inattentional blindness studies have shown that an unexpected object may go unnoticed if it does not share the property specified in the task instructions. Our aim was to demonstrate that observers develop an attentional set for a property not specified in the task instructions if it allows easier performance of the primary task. Three experiments were conducted using a dynamic selective-looking paradigm. Stimuli comprised four black squares and four white diamonds, so that shape and colour varied together. Task instructions specified (...)
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  6. Anne Aimola Davies (2004). Disorders of Spatial Orientation and Awareness: Unilateral Neglect. In Jennie Ponsford (ed.), Cognitive and Behavioral Rehabilitation: From Neurobiology to Clinical Practice. Guilford Press 175-223.
     
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  7.  22
    Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies, Terri J. Halleen & Martin Davies (2010). Tactile Expectations and the Perception of Self-Touch: An Investigation Using the Rubber Hand Paradigm. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):505-519.
    The rubber hand paradigm is used to create the illusion of self-touch, by having the participant administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner, with an identical stimulus , administers stimulation to the participant’s hand. With synchronous stimulation, participants experience the compelling illusion that they are touching their own hand. In the current study, the robustness of this illusion was assessed using incongruent stimuli. The participant used the index finger of the right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic (...)
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  8.  11
    Malcolm Davies (1984). Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho Anne Pippin Burnett: Three Archaic Poets: Archilochus, Alcaeus, Sappho. Pp. Viii + 320. London: Duckworth, 1983. £24. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 34 (02):169-173.
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  9. Lisa Harris, Anne‐Marie Coles & Richard Davies (2003). Emerging Ethical Perspectives of E‐Commerce. Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 1 (1):39-48.
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  10. Ian D. Graham, Susan Beardall, Anne O. Carter, Jacqueline Tetroe & Barbara Davies (2003). The State of the Science and Art of Practice Guidelines Development, Dissemination and Evaluation in Canada. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (2):195-202.
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  11.  2
    Andrew K. Macleod, Anne Andersen & Arabella Davies (1994). Self-Ratings of Positive and Negative Affect and Retrieval of Positive and Negative Affect Memories. Cognition and Emotion 8 (5):483-488.
  12.  2
    Philip Batterham, Andrew G. Davies, Anne Y. Game & John A. McKenzie (1996). Asymmetry - Where Evolutionary and Developmental Genetics Meet. Bioessays 18 (10):841-845.
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  13.  4
    Anne West, Philip Noden, Ann Edge, Miriam David & Jackie Davies (2006). Choices and Expectations at Primary and Secondary Stages in the State and Private Sectors. Educational Studies 24 (1):45-60.
    This paper examines a range of issues concerned with the process of choosing schools in the private and state sectors at the primary/pre‐preparatory stage and at the time of transfer to secondary/senior school. The findings indicate that choices about schools are made at different times and in different ways by parents who use the state and private sectors. One of the key findings is that the process of choosing a school begins earlier in the private than in the state sector; (...)
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  14.  5
    Anne Davies & Alan Haworth (1985). Correspondence. Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (1):155-158.
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  15.  5
    Brian Davies (2003). Why is There Anything at All?: Davies Why is Anything at All? Think 2 (4):7-15.
    The question of why there is anything at all is perhaps the deepest and most profound of all philosophical mysteries. Here, Brian Davies investigates whether it is reasonable to suppose the universe was created by God.
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  16. Martin Davies (1994). Antyredukcyjny naturalizm. Z Peterem Frederickiem Strawsonem rozmawiają Mark Sainsbury i Martin Davies. Filozofia Nauki 2.
    Professor Strawson was interviewed on video on location at King's College, London during the Spring of 1992. Professor Strawson discusses his thoughts on a variety of topics on which he has written previously, providing some illuminating insights into how his thoughts has progressed. The text published here is en excerpt from this interview, translated with kind permission of Mr Rudolf V. Fara, the producer, in which prof. Strawson discusses his philosophical views with Martin Davies, Wilde Reader in Mental Philosophy (...)
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  17.  39
    Martin Davies (1997). Meaning and Semantic Knowledge: Martin Davies. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 71 (1):209–210.
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  18.  5
    Margaret Davies, Ngaire Naffine, Anthony J. Connolly, Margaret Thornton, Rosalind F. Atherton & Peter Drahos (2003). Margaret Davies and Ngaire Naffine. Are Persons Property? Legal Debates About Property and Personality [Book Symposium.]. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 28 (2003):189.
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  19.  8
    Ceri Davies (1993). Martin Davies, John Goldfinch (Edd.): Vergil: A Census of Printed Editions, 1469–1500. (Occasional Papers of the Bibliographical Society, No. 7.) Pp. 124; 5 Plates. London: The Bibliographical Society, 1992. Paper, £10. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (02):427-428.
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  20. Donald Davidson & Martin Davies (1997). The Davies Discussion. Philosophy International.
     
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  21. Michael Davies (1994). The Davies Report the "Great Battle" in Swansea. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  22.  1
    Unilateral Neglect (2004). Aone Aimola Davies. In Jennie Ponsford (ed.), Cognitive and Behavioral Rehabilitation: From Neurobiology to Clinical Practice. Guilford Press 175.
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  23.  1
    Anne Aimola Davies Martin Davies (2005). Anosognosia and the Two‐Factor Theory of Delusions. Mind and Language 20 (2):209-236.
    : Anosognosia , and especially anosognosia for hemiplegia, seems to involve a belief that counts as a delusion by the usual definitions. Existing theories of anosognosia for hemiplegia appeal to impaired feedback from the paralysed side of the body and to cognitive impairments. We show how cases of anosognosia for hemiplegia can be brought within the scope of a generic two‐factor theory about the aetiology of monothematic delusions of neuropsychological origin.
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  24.  18
    Stephen Davies (2012). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution. OUP Oxford.
    Stephen Davies presents a fascinating exploration of the idea that art, and our aesthetic sensibilities more generally, should be understood as an element in human evolution. He asks: Do animals have aesthetics? Do our aesthetic preferences have prehistoric roots? Is art universal? What is the biological role of aesthetic and artistic behaviour?
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  25. Tony Davies (2008). Humanism. Routledge.
    Humanism offers students a clear and lucid introductory guide to the complexities of Humanism, one of the most contentious and divisive of artistic or literary concepts. Showing how the concept has evolved since the Renaissance period, Davies discusses humanism in the context of the rise of Fascism, the onset of World War II, the Holocaust, and their aftermath. Humanism provides basic definitions and concepts, a critique of the religion of humanity, and necessary background on religious, sexual and political themes (...)
     
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  26. Neema Sofaer, Penny Lewis & Hugh Davies (2012). Atención después de la investigación: un marco para los comités de ética de investigación del National Health Service (NHS) (borrador versión 8.0). Perspectivas Bioéticas 17 (33):47-70.
    Resumen Ésta es la primera traducción al español de las guías “Atención después de la investigación: un marco para los comités de ética de investigación del National Health Service (NHS) (borrador versión 8.0)”. El documento afirma que existe una fuerte obligación moral de garantizar que los participantes enfermos de un estudio clínico hagan una transición después del estudio hacia una atención de la salud apropiada. Con “atención de la salud apropiada” se hace referencia al acceso para los participantes a la (...)
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  27.  60
    P. C. W. Davies & Niels Henrik Gregersen (eds.) (2010). Information and the Nature of Reality: From Physics to Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: does information matter?; Paul Davies and Niels Henrik Gregersen; Part I. History: 2. From matter to materialism ... and (almost) back Ernan McMullin; 3. Unsolved dilemmas: the concept of matter in the history of philosophy and in contemporary physics Philip Clayton; Part II. Physics: 4. Universe from bit Paul Davies; 5. The computational universe Seth Lloyd; 6. Minds and values in the quantum universe Henry Pierce Stapp; Part III. Biology: 7. The concept (...)
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  28. Martin Davies (2004). Reference, Contingency, and the Two-Dimensional Framework. Philosophical Studies 118 (1-2):83-131.
    I review and reconsider some of the themes of ‘Two notions of necessity’ (Davies and Humberstone, 1980) and attempt to reach a deeper understanding and appreciation of Gareth Evans’s reflections (in ‘Reference and contingency’, 1979) on both modality and reference. My aim is to plot the relationships between the notions of necessity that Humberstone and I characterised in terms of operators in two-dimensional modal logic, the notions of superficial and deep necessity that Evans himself described, and the epistemic notion (...)
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  29. Brian Davies (2004). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    What does belief in God amount to? Can we reasonably believe in God's existence without argument or evidence? Can God's existence be proved? Can we believe in miracles? Is there life after death? In this book, Brian Davies provides a critical examination of some fundamental questions posed by religious belief. Completely rewritten in order to cover the latest developments in the field, the new edition of this highly successful textbook will once again prove the ideal introduction for all (...)
     
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  30.  49
    Stephen Davies (1994). Musical Meaning and Expression. Cornell University Press.
    But what does music mean, and how does it mean?Stephen Davies addresses these questions in this sophisticated and knowledgeable overview of current theories in ...
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  31. Crispin Wright & Martin Davies (2004). On Epistemic Entitlement. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78:167-245.
    [Crispin Wright] Two kinds of epistemological sceptical paradox are reviewed and a shared assumption, that warrant to accept a proposition has to be the same thing as having evidence for its truth, is noted. 'Entitlement', as used here, denotes a kind of rational warrant that counter-exemplifies that identification. The paper pursues the thought that there are various kinds of entitlement and explores the possibility that the sceptical paradoxes might receive a uniform solution if entitlement can be made to reach sufficiently (...)
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  32.  32
    Stephen Davies (2003). Themes in the Philosophy of Music. Oxford University Press.
    Representing Stephen Davies's best shorter writings, these essays outline developments within the philosophy of music over the last two decades, and summarize the state of play at the beginning of a new century. Including two new and previously unpublished pieces, they address both perennial questions and contemporary controversies, such as that over the 'authentic performance' movement, and the impact of modern technology on the presentation and reception of musical works. Rather than attempting to reduce musical works to a (...)
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  33. Bronwyn Davies (2000). A Body of Writing, 1990-1999. Altamira Press.
    Weaving together her most influential writings of the 1990s, Bronwyn Davies offers a unique engagement with poststructuralism that defies the boundaries between theory and embodied practice. Whereas poststructuralists are often accused of excessive abstraction, Davies' sophisticated and nuanced discussions of subjectivity, agency, epistemology, feminism, and power are embedded in vital depictions of lived experience and empirical research. A renowned scholar of education and gender formation, Davies shows the importance of poststructural perspectives for her own research in classrooms, (...)
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  34.  64
    Robyn Langdon, Martin Davies & Max Coltheart (2002). Understanding Minds and Understanding Communicated Meanings in Schizophrenia. Mind and Language 17 (1-2):68-104.
    Cognitive neuropsychology is that branch of cognitive psychology that investi- gates people with acquired or developmental disorders of cognition. The aim is to learn more about how cognitive systems normally operate or about how they are normally acquired by studying selective patterns of cognitive break- down after brain damage or selective dif?culties in acquiring particular cogni- tive abilities. In the early days of modern cognitive neuropsychology, research focused on rather basic cognitive abilities such as speech comprehension or production at the (...)
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  35.  8
    Bronwyn Davies & Susanne Gannon (eds.) (2009). Pedagogical Encounters. Peter Lang.
    Introduction Bronwyn Davies We began this book at a collective biography workshop that Susanne and I convened in a house at Bombo on the south coast of New ...
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  36. David Davies (ed.) (2008). The Thin Red Line. Routledge.
    The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick, set during the struggle between American and Japanese forces for Guadalcanal in the South Pacific during World War Two. It is a powerful, enigmatic and complex film that raises important philosophical questions, ranging from the existential and phenomenological to the artistic and technical. This is the first collection dedicated to exploring the philosophical aspects of Malick’s film. Opening with a helpful introduction that places the film in (...)
     
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  37.  19
    Stephen Davies (2007/2010). Philosophical Perspectives on Art. New York;Oxford University Press.
    Philosophical Perspectives on Art presents a series of essays devoted to two of the most fundamental topics in the philosophy of art: the distinctive character of artworks and what is involved in understanding them as art. In Part I, Stephen Davies considers a wide range of questions about the nature and definition of art. Can art be defined, and if so, which definitions are the most plausible? Do we make and consume art because there are evolutionary advantages to doing (...)
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  38. Brian Davies (ed.) (2000). Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
    Is it possible to be both a philosopher and a religious believer? Is philosophy a friend or foe to religious belief? Does talk of God make sense? Does God exist? What is God? Ideal for anyone pondering these and similar questions, Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology provides a comprehensive, authoritative, and accessible overview of the subject. Carefully edited by Brian Davies, it contains a wide-ranging selection of 65 of the best classical and contemporary writings on the (...)
     
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  39.  8
    Gloria Davies (2007). Worrying About China: The Language of Chinese Critical Inquiry. Harvard University Press.
    In Worrying about China, Gloria Davies pursues this inquiry through a wide range of contemporary topics, including the changing fortunes of radicalism, the ...
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  40.  8
    Oliver Davies (2004). The Creativity of God: World, Eucharist, Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    We have, as a theological community, generally lost a language in which to speak of the created-ness of the world. As a consequence, our discourses of reason cannot bridge the way we know God and the way we know the world. Therefore, argues Oliver Davies, a primary task of contemporary theology is the regeneration of a Christian account of the world as sacramental, leading to the formation of a Christian conception of reason and a new Christocentric understanding of the (...)
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  41. Dave Davies (2003). Art as Performance. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this richly argued and provocative book, David Davies elaborates and defends a broad conceptual framework for thinking about the arts that reveals important continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern art, and between different artistic disciplines. Elaborates and defends a broad conceptual framework for thinking about the arts. Offers a provocative view about the kinds of things that artworks are and how they are to be understood. Reveals important continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern art. Highlights core (...)
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  42.  11
    E. B. Davies (2003). Science in the Looking Glass: What Do Scientists Really Know? Oxford University Press.
    In this wide-ranging book, Brian Davies discusses the basis for scientists' claims to knowledge about the world. He looks at science historically, emphasizing not only the achievements of scientists from Galileo onwards, but also their mistakes. He rejects the claim that all scientific knowledge is provisional, by citing examples from chemistry, biology and geology. A major feature of the book is its defense of the view that mathematics was invented rather than discovered. A large number of examples are (...)
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  43. Stephen Davies (2003). Themes in Philosophy of Music. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Is music a language of the emotions? How do recorded pop songs differ from works created for live performance? Is John Cage's silent piece, 4'33', music? Stephen Davies's new book collects some of his most important papers on central topics in the philosophy of music. As well as perennial questions, Davies addresses contemporary controversies, including the impact of modern technology on the presentation and reception of both new and old musical works.
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  44.  17
    Brian Davies (2003). Why is There Anything at All? Think 2 (4):7-15.
    The question of why there is anything at all is perhaps the deepest and most profound of all philosophical mysteries. Here, Brian Davies investigates whether it is reasonable to suppose the universe was created by God.
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  45. P. C. W. Davies, Transit Time of a Freely Falling Quantum Particle in a Background Gravitational Field.
    Using a model quantum clock, I evaluate an expression for the time of a nonrelativistic quantum particle to transit a piecewise geodesic path in a background gravitational field with small spacetime curvature (gravity gradient), in the case that the apparatus is in free fall. This calculation complements and extends an earlier one (Davies 2004) in which the apparatus is fixed to the surface of the Earth. The result confirms that, for particle velocities not too low, the quantum and classical (...)
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  46.  23
    Richard Davies (2001). Descartes: Belief, Skepticism, and Virtue. Routledge.
    Davies explores neglected areas of Descartes' philosophy, such as his thoughts on virtue, and questions whether or not this will call for a reassessment of Descartes' role in western philosophy.
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  47. Richard Davies (2001). Descartes: Belief, Scepticism and Virtue. Routledge.
    Descartes is often regarded as the founder of modern philosophy, and is credited with placing at centre stage the question of what we know and how we know it. Descartes: Belief, Scepticism and Virtue seeks to reinsert his work and thought in its contemporary ethical and theological context. Richard Davies explores the much neglected notion of intellectual virtue as it applies to Descartes' inquiry as a whole. He examines the textual dynamics of Descartes' most famous writings in relation (...)
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  48.  8
    Peter W. F. Davies (1997). Technology and Business Ethics Theory. Business Ethics 6 (2):76–80.
    The various theories about business ethics need to take much more notice of technology, realising that technology has its own increasing momentum which is driving business, and that, whereas business people think they control technology as a simple neutral means to their ends, in fact the reverse is true: business is the servant of technological development. Jacques Ellul, however, offers some hope for the future to help us ‘reappropriate our humanity’. Dr Davies is a senior lecturer in Strategic Management (...)
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  49. Howard Davies (2001). Ethics in Regulation. Business Ethics 10 (4):280–287.
    This paper was given as the opening address at the 13th Annual European Business Ethics Network Conference' held in Cambridge 12–14 September 2000. The Chairman of the Financial Services Authority, Howard Davies, first outlined the background to the present approach to financial regulation in the UK. He described the principle‐based regulatory regime which is now in the process of being implemented, and the role of rules, regulations and guidelines in making this effective. However, compliance is not sufficient; for the (...)
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  50.  24
    Stephen Davies (2010). The Hypothetical Intentionalist's Dilemma: A Reply to Levinson. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (3):307-312.
    In a recent essay, Jerrold Levinson defends his version of hypothetical intentionalism (HI), which is a theory of literary interpretation, from two criticisms. The first, argued by Stephen Davies, is that it is equivalent to the value-maximizing view. The second, argued by Robert Stecker, is that there are straightforward counterexamples to HI. We will argue that Levinson does not successfully fend off either criticism, and further, that in the process of attempting to do so, creates another dilemma for his (...)
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