12 found
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  1.  5
    Anne Barnhill, Steven Joffe & Franklin G. Miller (2016). The Ethics of Infection Challenges in Primates. Hastings Center Report 46 (2).
    In the midst of the recent Ebola outbreak, scientific developments involving infection challenge experiments on nonhuman primates sparked hope that successful treatments and vaccines may soon become available. Yet these studies pose a stark ethical quandary. On the one hand, they represent an important step in developing novel therapies and vaccines for Ebola and the Marburg virus, with the potential to save thousands of human lives and to protect whole communities from devastation; on the other hand, they intentionally expose sophisticated (...)
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  2.  66
    Anne Barnhill (2011). What It Takes to Defend Deceptive Placebo Use. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (3):219-250.
    The American Medical Association prohibits physicians from giving placebos to their patients unless the patients are informed of and agree to the use of placebos.1 This prohibition, and the ethics of placebo treatment more generally, have been discussed in numerous recent papers (Finniss, Kaptchuk, Miller, et al. 2010; Shaw 2009; Foddy 2009; Miller and Colloca 2009; Kolber 2007; Blease 2010). Though some bioethicists support the AMA prohibition, others challenge it, arguing that using placebos without patients’ knowledge and consent—that is, using (...)
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  3.  12
    Anne Barnhill & Franklin G. Miller (2015). Placebo and Deception: A Commentary. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (1):69-82.
    In a recent article in this Journal, Shlomo Cohen and Haim Shapiro introduce the concept of “comparable placebo treatments” —placebo treatments with biological effects similar to the drugs they replace—and argue that doctors are not being deceptive when they prescribe or administer CPTs without revealing that they are placebos. We critique two of Cohen and Shapiro’s primary arguments. First, Cohen and Shapiro argue that offering undisclosed placebos is not lying to the patient, but rather is making a self-fulfilling prophecy—telling a (...)
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  4.  57
    Anne Barnhill (2013). Bringing the Body Back to Sexual Ethics. Hypatia 28 (1):1-17.
    The body and bodily experience make little appearance in analytic moral philosophy. This is true even of analytic sexual ethics—the one area of ethical inquiry we might have expected to give a starring role to bodily experience. I take a small step toward remedying that by identifying one way in which the bodily experience of sex is ethically significant: some of the physical actions of sex have a default expressive significance, conveying trust, affection, care, sensitivity, enjoyment, and pleasure. When people (...)
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  5.  7
    Anne Barnhill & Stephanie R. Morain (2015). Latch On or Back Off?: Public Health, Choice, and the Ethics of Breast-Feeding Promotion Campaigns. Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 8 (2):139-171.
    Breastfeeding and human milk are the normative standards for infant feeding and nutrition. Given the documented short- and long-term medical and neurodevelopment advantages of breastfeeding, infant nutrition should be considered a public health issue and not only a lifestyle choice.In a letter sent out to 2600 hospitals across the country they [Public Citizen] demand that healthcare facilities “immediately discontinue the distribution of commercial infant formula manufacturer discharge bags,” claiming it undermines women’s success at breastfeeding. What they failed to explain is (...)
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  6.  14
    Anne Barnhill, Katherine F. King, Nancy Kass & Ruth Faden (2014). The Value of Unhealthy Eating and the Ethics of Healthy Eating Policies. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):187-217.
    As concerns about the negative health effects of unhealthy eating, overweight and obesity have increased, so too have policy efforts to promote healthy eating. Federal, state, and local governments have proposed and implemented a variety of healthy eating policies. Many of these policies are controversial, facing objections that range from the practical (e.g., the policy won’t succeed at improving people’s diets) to the ethical (e.g., the policy is paternalistic or inequitable). Especially controversial have been policies limiting the options offered in (...)
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  7.  2
    Anne Barnhill, Nikola Biller-Andorno, Verina Wild, Larry Carbone, Sonya Charles, Andrew Courtwright & Christy L. Cummings (2012). Following is the Comprehensive Index for Volume 42 of the Hastings Center Report, Covering All Feature Material From 2012. Letters Have Not Been Included. Ffl Complete Issues Are Available for Volume 42 (2012) and May Be Purchased From Wiley-Blackwell; E-Mail: Cs-Journals@ Wiley. Com. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 42.
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  8.  8
    Anne Barnhill & Katherine F. King (2013). Evaluating Equity Critiques in Food Policy: The Case of Sugar‐Sweetened Beverages. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (1):301-309.
    Many anti-obesity policies face a variety of ethical objections. We consider one kind of anti-obesity policy — modifications to food assistance programs meant to improve participants' diet — and one kind of criticism of these policies, that they are inequitable. We take as our example the recent, unsuccessful effort by New York State to exclude sweetened beverages from the items eligible for purchase in New York City with Supplemental Nutrition Support Program assistance. We distinguish two equity-based ethical objections that were (...)
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  9.  1
    Jennifer K. Walter & Anne Barnhill (2013). Good and Bad Ideas in Obesity Prevention. Hastings Center Report 43 (3):6-7.
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  10.  1
    Anne Barnhill (2012). Clinical Use of Placebos: Still the Physician's Prerogative? Hastings Center Report 42 (3):29-37.
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  11. Anne Barnhill & Katherine F. King (2013). Evaluating Equity Critiques in Food Policy: The Case of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (1):301-309.
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  12. Anne Barnhill & Franklin G. Miller (2015). The Ethics of Placebo Treatments in Clinical Practice: A Reply to Glackin. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):673-676.
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