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  1. Anne Drapkin Lyerly & Peter Schwartz (forthcoming). Case Study: Is the Patient Always Right? Hastings Center Report.
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  2. Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2012). Ethical Issues in Reproduction. In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press.
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  3. Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2012). Issues in Reproduction. In D. Micah Hester & Toby Schonfeld (eds.), Guidance for Healthcare Ethics Committees. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  4. Ruth R. Faden, Margaret Olivia Little & Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2011). Reframing the Framework: Toward Fair Inclusion of Pregnant Women as Participants in Research. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):50-52.
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  5. Howard Minkoff & Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2010). Samantha Burton and the Rights of Pregnant Women Twenty Years After In Re A.C. Hastings Center Report 40 (6):13-15.
    In 1987, a young woman named Angela Carder, pregnant and dying from cancer, was ordered by a court of law to undergo a cesarean delivery against her and her family’s wishes. She and her baby both died. Three years later, an appeals court took an extraordinary stand: it vacated the order that ended their lives and upheld pregnant women’s rights to informed consent and bodily integrity. The “unkindest cut of all,”1 it seemed, had been condemned by the courts.2 Yet shortly (...)
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  6. Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann, Margaret Little, Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth M. Armstrong & Lisa Harris (2009). Finding Autonomy in Birth. Bioethics 23 (1):1-8.
    Over the last several years, as cesarean deliveries have grown increasingly common, there has been a great deal of public and professional interest in the phenomenon of women 'choosing' to deliver by cesarean section in the absence of any specific medical indication. The issue has sparked intense conversation, as it raises questions about the nature of autonomy in birth. Whereas mainstream bioethical discourse is used to associating autonomy with having a large array of choices, this conception of autonomy does not (...)
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  7. Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong, Lisa H. Harris, Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann & Margaret Olivia Little (2009). Risk and the Pregnant Body. Hastings Center Report 39 (6):34-42.
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  8. Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Margaret Olivia Little & Ruth Faden (2008). The Second Wave: Toward Responsible Inclusion of Pregnant Women in Research. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):5 - 22.
    Though much progress has been made on inclusion of non-pregnant women in research, thoughtful discussion about including pregnant women has lagged behind. We outline resulting knowledge gaps and their costs and then highlight four reasons why ethically we are obliged to confront the challenges of including pregnant women in clinical research. These are: the need for effective treatment for women during pregnancy, fetal safety, harm from the reticence to prescribe potentially beneficial medication, and the broader issues of justice and access (...)
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  9. Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Margaret Olivia Little & Ruth R. Faden (2008). A Critique of the 'Fetus as Patient'. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):42 – 44.
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  10. Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Margaret Olivia Little & Ruth R. Faden (2008). Pregnancy and Clinical Research. Hastings Center Report 38 (6):3-3.
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  11. Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2006). Shame, Gender, Birth. Hypatia 21 (1):101-118.
    : In recent years, critics of modern obstetrics have cited technology as responsible for women's discontent regarding childbirth. In this essay, I investigate and pry apart the connection between the quality of childbirth experience and technology. After identifying three factors considered constitutive of a 'good birth,' I demonstrate how technology can either facilitate or hinder each, but how dominant strains of birthing practice that reinforce female shame (hospital-based obstetrics and midwifery) consistently undermine them all. It is not technology per se, (...)
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  12. Anne Drapkin Lyerly (2004). Ethics Journal of the American Medical Association February 2004, Volume 6, Number 2 Clinical Case. Ethics 6 (2):1.
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  13. Anne Drapkin Lyerly & Peter Schwartz (2004). Is the Patient Always Right? Hastings Center Report 34 (2):13-14.
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  14. Anne Drapkin Lyerly & Ruth R. Faden (2003). HIV and Assisted Reproductive Technology: Women and Healthcare Policy. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (1):41-43.
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  15. Anne Drapkin Lyerly & Mary Briody Mahowald (2001). Maternal-Fetal Surgery: The Fallacy of Abstraction and the Problem of Equipoise. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 9 (2):151-165.
    When surgery is performed on pregnant women forthe sake of the fetus (MFS or maternal fetalsurgery), it is often discussed in terms of thefetus alone. This usage exemplifies whatphilosophers call the fallacy of abstraction: considering a concept as if it were separablefrom another concept whose meaning isessentially related to it. In light of theirpotential separability, research on pregnantwomen raises the possibility of conflictsbetween the interests of the woman and those ofthe fetus. Such research should meet therequirement of equipoise, i.e., a (...)
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  16. Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Evan R. Myers & Ruth R. Faden (2001). The Ethics of Aggregation and Hormone Replacement Therapy. Health Care Analysis 9 (2):187-211.
    The use of aggregated quality of life estimatesin the formation of public policy and practiceguidelines raises concerns about the moralrelevance of variability in values inpreferences for health care. This variabilitymay reflect unique and deeply held beliefs thatmay be lost when averaged with the preferencesof other individuals. Feminist moral theorieswhich argue for attention to context andparticularity underline the importance ofascertaining the extent to which differences inpreferences for health states revealinformation which is morally relevant toclinicians and policymakers. To facilitatethese considerations, we present (...)
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