14 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Anne Schwenkenbecher (Murdoch University)
  1. Anne Schwenkenbecher (forthcoming). Joint Moral Duties. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 38.
    There are countless circumstances under which random individuals could act together to prevent something morally bad from happening or to remedy a morally bad situation. But when ought individuals to act together in order to bring about a morally important outcome? This paper seeks to answer that question. Building on Philip Pettit’s and David Schweikard’s account of joint action, I will put forward the notion of joint duties: duties to perform an action together that individuals in so-called random or unstructured (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2014). Collateral Damage and the Principle of Due Care. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):94-105.
    This article focuses on the ethical implications of so-called ‘collateral damage’. It develops a moral typology of collateral harm to innocents, which occurs as a side effect of military or quasi-military action. Distinguishing between accidental and incidental collateral damage, it introduces four categories of such damage: negligent, oblivious, knowing and reckless collateral damage. Objecting mainstream versions of the doctrine of double effect, the article argues that in order for any collateral damage to be morally permissible, violent agents must comply with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2013). Bridging The Emissions Gap: A Plea For Taking Up The Slack. Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 3 (1):273-301.
    With the existing commitments to climate change mitigation, global warming is likely to exceed 2°C and to trigger irreversible and harmful threshold effects. The difference between the reductions necessary to keep the 2°C limit and those reductions countries have currently committed to is called the ‘emissions gap’. I argue that capable states not only have a moral duty to make voluntary contributions to bridge that gap, but that complying states ought to make up for the failures of some other states (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2013). Joint Duties and Global Moral Obligations. Ratio 26 (3):310-328.
    In recent decades, concepts of group agency and the morality of groups have increasingly been discussed by philosophers. Notions of collective or joint duties have been invoked especially in the debates on global justice, world poverty and climate change. This paper enquires into the possibility and potential nature of moral duties individuals in unstructured groups may hold together. It distinguishes between group agents and groups of people which – while not constituting a collective agent – are nonetheless capable of performing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2013). Rethinking Legitimate Authority. In Fritz Allhoff, Nicholas Evans & Adam Henschke (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ethics and War: Just War Theory in the 21st Century. Routledge.
    The just war-criterion of legitimate authority – as it is traditionally framed – restricts the right to wage war to state actors. However, agents engaged in violent conflicts are often sub-state or non-state actors. Former liberation movements and their leaders have in the past become internationally recognized as legitimate political forces and legitimate leaders. But what makes it appropriate to consider particular violent non-state actors to legitimate violent agents and others not? This article will examine four criteria, including ‘popular support (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Anna Goppel & Anne Schwenkenbecher (2012). Philosophy and International Law: Reflections on Interdisciplinary Research Into Terrorism. Ancilla Iuris 111.
    This essay investigates the possibilities and limits of interdisciplinary research into terrorism. It is shown that approaches that combine philosophy and international law are necessary, and when such an approach needs to be adopted. However, it is also important not to underestimate how much of a challenge is posed by the absence of agreement concerning the definition of terrorism, and also by the structural differences in the way the two disciplines address the problem and formulate the issues. Not least, the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2012). Is There an Obligation to Reduce One’s Individual Carbon Footprint? Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy (2):1-21.
    Moral duties concerning climate change mitigation are – for good reasons – conventionally construed as duties of institutional agents, usually states. Yet, in both scholarly debate and political discourse, it has occasionally been argued that the moral duties lie not only with states and institutional agents, but also with individual citizens. This argument has been made with regard to mitigation efforts, especially those reducing greenhouse gases. This paper focuses on the question of whether individuals in industrialized countries have duties to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2012). Terrorism: A Philosophical Enquiry. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- PART I: DEFINING 'TERRORISM' -- On The Current Debate On Defining Terrorism -- What Is Terrorism? -- PART II: ETHICS OF TERRORISM OR CAN TERRORISM EVER BE PERMISSIBLE? -- Innocents and Non-Innocents -- Terrorism Against Non-Innocents -- Terrorism Against Innocents -- Collateral Damage -- Concluding Remarks -- References -- Index.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2011). Killing in War. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):376 - 377.
    Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Volume 89, Issue 2, Page 376-377, June 2011.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2011). How to Punish Collective Agents. Ethics and International Affairs.
    Assuming that states can hold moral duties, it can easily be seen that states—just like any other moral agent—can sometimes fail to discharge those moral duties. In the context of climate change examples of states that do not meet their emission reduction targets abound. If individual moral agents do wrong they usually deserve and are liable to some kind of punishment. But how can states be punished for failing to comply with moral duties without therewith also punishing their citizens who (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2011). Moral Obligations of States. In Applied Ethics Series. Center of Applied Ethics and Philosophy.
    It is widely accepted that industrialized or wealthy countries in particular have moral obligations or duties of justice to combat world poverty or to shoulder burdens of climate change. But what does it actually mean to say that a state has moral obligations or duties of justice? In this paper I focus on Tony Erskine’s account of moral agency of states. With her, I argue that collectives such as states can hold (collective) moral duties. However, Erskine’s approach does not clarify (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. John Kelsay, Sujatha Byravan, Sudhir Chella Rajan, Damning Souls, Toni Erskine, Thomas E. Doyle, Anne Schwenkenbecher, On Amartya Sen, Chris Brown & Rekha Nath (2010). Carnegie Council. Ethics and International Affairs 24.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2010). Terrorism Against Non-Innocents: The Ethical Implications. In Paul Omoyefa (ed.), Basic Applied Ethics. VDM.
    The debate on the ethics of terrorism focuses for the most part on the argument that employing violence against innocents or non-combatants is morally wrong. This point is usually made in combination with a so called narrow definition of terrorism , i.e. one that defines terrorism as exclusively targeting innocents . Yet, some scholars prefer a so called wide definition of terrorism, i.e. they hold that it may well be directed against non-innocents. Leaving from the assumption that terrorism can be (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2009). Terrorism, Supreme Emergency and Killing the Innocent. Perspectives - The Review of International Affairs 17 (1):105-126.
    Terrorist violence is often condemned for targeting innocents or non-combatants. There are two objections to this line of argument. First, one may doubt that terrorism is necessarily directed against innocents or non-combatants. However, I will focus on the second objection, according to which there may be exceptions from the prohibition against killing the innocent. In my article I will elaborate whether lethal terrorism against innocents can be justified in a supreme emergency. Starting from a critique of Michael Walzer’s account of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation