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Annie L. Booth [8]Annie Booth [7]
  1. Annie L. Booth (2011). Speaking for Ourselves. Environmental Ethics 33 (1):97-98.
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  2. Annie L. Booth (2008). Beyond Mothering Earth. Environmental Ethics 30 (1):109-110.
  3. Annie L. Booth (2005). Ecofeminism and Globalization. Environmental Ethics 27 (3):317-318.
  4. Annie Booth (2000). Indigenous Worlds and Callicott's Land Ethic. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):273-290.
    We assess J. Baird Callicott’s attempt in Earth’s Insights to reconcile his land ethic with the “environmental ethics” of indigenous peoples. We critique the rejection of ethical pluralism that informs this attempted rapprochement. We also assess Callicott’s strategy of grounding his land ethic in a postmodern scientific world view by contrasting it with the roles of “respect” and narrative in indigenous “ethics.”.
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  5. Lee Hester, Dennis McPherson & Annie Booth (2000). Indigenous Worlds and Callicott's Land Ethic. Environmental Ethics 22 (3):273-290.
    We assess J. Baird Callicott’s attempt in Earth’s Insights to reconcile his land ethic with the “environmental ethics” of indigenous peoples. We critique the rejection of ethical pluralism that informs this attempted rapprochement. We also assess Callicott’s strategy of grounding his land ethic in a postmodern scientific world view by contrasting it with the roles of “respect” and narrative in indigenous “ethics.”.
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  6. Annie L. Booth (1999). Does the Spirit Move You? Environmental Spirituality. Environmental Values 8 (1):89 - 105.
    This article looks at the idea of spirituality as it is discussed within ecophilosophical circles, particularly ecofeminism, bioregionalism, and deep ecology, as a means to improve human-nature interactions. The article also examines the use each ecophilosophy makes of a popular alternative to main-stream religion, that of Native American spiritualities, and problems inherent in adapting that alternative.
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  7. Annie Booth (1998). Earthly Goods, Environmental Change, and Social Justice. Environmental Ethics 20 (3):335-336.
  8. Annie L. Booth (1998). Learning From Others: Ecophilosophy and Traditional Native American Women's Lives. Environmental Ethics 20 (1):81-99.
    I examine the roles of traditional Native American women with regard to their impact on maintaining appropriate spiritual, cultural, and physical relationships with the natural world and discuss lessons that ecophilosphers might find useful in reexamining their own spiritual, cultural, and physical relationships.
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  9. Annie L. Booth (1998). Learning From Others. Environmental Ethics 20 (1):81-99.
    I examine the roles of traditional Native American women with regard to their impact on maintaining appropriate spiritual, cultural, and physical relationships with the natural world and discuss lessons that ecophilosphers might find useful in reexamining their own spiritual, cultural, and physical relationships.
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  10. Andrew Light, Jonathan M. Smith, Annie L. Booth, Robert Burch, John Clark, Anthony M. Clayton, Matthew Gandy, Eric Katz, Roger King, Roger Paden, Clive L. Spash, Eliza Steelwater, Zev Trachtenberg & James L. Wescoat (1996). Philosophy and Geography I: Space, Place, and Environmental Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  11. Annie Booth (1995). Women, the Environment and Sustainable Development. Environmental Ethics 17 (4):441-441.
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  12. Annie L. Booth & Harvey L. Jacobs (1990). Ties That Bind: Native American Beliefs as a Foundation for Environmental Consciousness. Environmental Ethics 12 (1):27-43.
    In this article we examine the specific contributions Native American thought can make to the ongoing search for a Western ecological consciousness. We begin with a review of the influence of Native American beliefs on the different branches of the modem environmental movement and some initial comparisons of Western and Native American ways of seeing. We then review Native American thought on the natural world, highlighting beliefs in the need for reciprocity and balance, the world as a living being, and (...)
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  13. Annie Booth (1989). Robert Augros and George Stanciu: The New Biology: Discovering the Wisdom in Nature. Environmental Ethics 11 (1):93-94.
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