Search results for 'Anomalous' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Julie Yoo (2009). Anomalous Monism. In Brian P. McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oup Oxford.score: 24.0
    This is an overview of Davidson's theory of anomalous monism. Objections and replies are also detailed.
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  2. M. de Pinedo (2006). Anomalous Monism: Oscillating Between Dogmas. Synthese 148 (1):79-97.score: 24.0
    Davidson’s anomalous monism, his argument for the identity between mental and physical event tokens, has been frequently attacked, usually demanding a higher degree of physicalist commitment. My objection runs in the opposite direction: the identities inferred by Davidson from mental causation, the nomological character of causality and the anomaly of the mental are philosophically problematic and, more dramatically, incompatible with his famous argument against the third dogma of empiricism, the separation of content from conceptual scheme. Given the anomaly of (...)
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  3. Mark Silcox, Mind and Anomalous Monism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Anomalous Monism is a type of property dualism in the philosophy of mind. Property dualism combines the thesis that mental phenomena are strictly irreducible to physical phenomena with the denial that mind and body are discrete substances. For the anomalous monist, the plausibility of property dualism derives from the fact that although mental states, events and processes have genuine causal powers, the causal relationships that they enter into with physical entities cannot be explained by appeal to fundamental laws (...)
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  4. Mehdi Nasrin (2004). Anomalous Monism in Carnap's Aufbau. Erkenntnis 60 (3):283-293.score: 24.0
    The Logical Reconstruction of the World (Aufbau) is oneof the major works of Rudolf Carnap in which he attempts to put an end to some of the traditional disputes in epistemology by using what he calls 'construction theory'. According to this theory, one or more constructional systems can be designed in which all the scientific and pre-scientific objects are logically made out of a limited number of basic elements. Carnap introduces some options for the basis of this system and chooses (...)
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  5. David Jean Acunzo, Renaud Evrard & Thomas Rabeyron (2013). Anomalous Experiences, Psi and Functional Neuroimaging. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:893.score: 24.0
    Anomalous experiences, psi and functional neuroimaging.
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  6. Jacopo Tagliabue (forthcoming). Anomalous Monism in a Digital Universe. Minds and Machines:1-12.score: 24.0
    Bermúdez (Philosophy of psychology: a contemporary introduction, Routledge, London, 2005) identifies the “Interface Problem” as the central problem in the philosophy of psychology: how commonsensical psychological explanations can be integrated with lower-level (cognitive, biological, etc.) explanations? In particular, since folk psychology is meant to provide causal explanations on a par with, say, neurobiological explanations, the question of how to understand the relation between the two layers arises naturally. Donald Davidson claimed that the interface problem is actually ill-posed and put forward (...)
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  7. Mario Zanforlin (2003). Stereokinetic Anomalous Contours: Demonstrations. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 13 (3-4):389-398.score: 24.0
    Collinearity or correspondence between the contours of the inducing figure to allow `contour continuation' or `figure completion' were, according to G. Kanizsa, the necessary conditions for producing anomalous surfaces or contours. Since Kanizsa's early work various hypotheses have been advanced to explain the phenomenon, but very few examples of anomalous contours that do not satisfy the above conditions have been reported. When two small white discs (1 cm in diameter) are set on a larger black disc in slow (...)
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  8. Ted Honderich (1982). The Argument for Anomalous Monism. Analysis 42 (January):59-64.score: 21.0
  9. B. A. Maher (1999). Anomalous Experience in Everyday Life: Its Significance for Psychopathology. The Monist 82 (4):547-70.score: 21.0
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  10. R. B. Lawson & R. J. Pandina (1969). Effects of Matrix Elements on Steropsis and Anomalous Contour. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):322.score: 21.0
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  11. Nancy Hancock Slonneger (2001). Anomalous Monism and Physical Closure. Journal of Philosophical Research 26 (January):175-185.score: 21.0
     
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  12. Louise M. Antony (1989). Anomalous Monism and the Problem of Explanatory Force. Philosophical Review 98 (April):153-87.score: 18.0
    Concern about two problems runs through the work of davidson: the problem of accounting for the "explanatory force" of rational explanations, and the problem posed for materialism by the apparent anomalousness of psychological events. davidson believes that his view of mental causation, imbedded in his theory of "anomalous monism," can provide satisfactory answers to both questions. however, it is argued in this paper that davidson's program contains a fundamental inconsistency; that his metaphysics, while grounding the doctrine of anomalous (...)
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  13. Rex Welshon (1999). Anomalous Monism and Epiphenomenalism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (1):103-120.score: 18.0
    I argue that, on plausible assumptions, anomalous entails monism epiphenomenalism of the mental. The plausible assumptions are (1) events are particulars; (2) causal relations are extensional; (3) mental properties are epiphrastic. A principle defender of anomalous monism, Donald Davidson, acknowledges that anomalous monism is committed to (1) and (2). I argue that it is committed to (3) as well. Given (1), (2), and (3), epiphenomenalism of the mental falls out immediately. Three attempts to salvage anomalous monism (...)
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  14. Claire Edwards (2013). The Anomalous Wellbeing of Disabled People: A Response. Topoi 32 (2):189-196.score: 18.0
    Disabled people frequently find themselves in situations where their quality of life and wellbeing is being measured or judged by others, whether in decisions about health care provision or assessments for social supports. Recent debates about wellbeing and how it might be assessed (through subjective and/or objective measures) have prompted a renewed focus on disabled people’s wellbeing because of its seemingly ‘anomalous’ nature; that is, whilst to external (objective) observers the wellbeing of disabled people appears poor, based on subjective (...)
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  15. Nick Zangwill (1993). Supervenience and Anomalous Monism: Blackburn on Davidson. Philosophical Studies 71 (1):59-79.score: 18.0
    In his paper "Supervenience Revisisted", Simon Blackburn redeployed his novel modal argument against moral realism as an argument against Donald Davidson's position of 'anomalous monism' in the philosophy of mind (Blackburn 1985).' I shall assess this redeployment. In the first part of this paper, I shall lay out Blackburn's argument. In the second and longer part I shall examine Davidson's denial of psychophysical laws in the light of this argument.
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  16. Robert G. Jahn & Brenda J. Dunne (1986). On the Quantum Mechanics of Consciousness, with Application to Anomalous Phenomena. Foundations of Physics 16 (8):721-772.score: 18.0
    Theoretical explication of a growing body of empirical data on consciousness-related anomalous phenomena is unlikely to be achieved in terms of known physical processes. Rather, it will first be necessary to formulate the basic role of consciousness in the definition of reality before such anomalous experience can adequately be represented. This paper takes the position that reality is constituted only in the interaction of consciousness with its environment, and therefore that any scheme of conceptual organization developed to represent (...)
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  17. Victor Elias, Kevin B. Sprague & Ying Xue (2000). Vacuum Condensates and the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of a Dirac Fermion. Foundations of Physics 30 (3):439-461.score: 18.0
    We address anticipated fermion–antifermion and dimension-4 gauge-field vacuum-condensate contributions to the magnetic portion of the fermion–photon vertex function in the presence of a vacuum with nonperturbative content, such as that of QCD. We discuss how inclusion of such condensate contributions may lead to a vanishing anomalous magnetic moment, in which case vacuum condensates may account for the apparent consistency between constituent quark masses characterizing baryon magnetic moments and those characterizing baryon spectroscopy.
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  18. Stanley Krippner (2006). Geomagnetic Field Effects in Anomalous Dreams and the Akashic Field. World Futures 62 (1 & 2):103 – 113.score: 18.0
    Ervin Laszlo has used the ancient concept of the Akashic Records for the basis of his "Akashic Field" (A-field) model, one that has obvious implications for parapsychology, the scientific study of anomalous human-human and human-environment interactions, that is, "psi." Experiments with "telepathic" and "precognitive" dreams are one example of parapsychological research that may fit the A-field model because of its information-carrying potential. Psi appears to be a complex system, one that may reflect the connective "web" posited by the A-field (...)
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  19. Andrea Zhok (2011). A Phenomenological Reading of Anomalous Monism. Husserl Studies 27 (3):227-256.score: 18.0
    The essay discusses Donald Davidson’s concept of anomalous monism in the framework of Husserlian phenomenology. It develops in four stages. Section 1 is devoted to a critical presentation of the argument for anomalous monism. Section 2 succinctly examines those Husserlian notions that best provide the ground for a discussion parallel to Davidson’s. In Sect. 3, the aporetic status of “mental causation” is analyzed by providing a genetic-phenomenological account of efficient causation. Section 4 draws some general conclusions concerning the (...)
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  20. William F. Brewer & Clark A. Chinn (1994). Scientists' Responses to Anomalous Data: Evidence From Psychology, History, and Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:304 - 313.score: 18.0
    This paper presents an analysis of the forms of response that scientists make when confronted with anomalous data. We postulate that there are seven ways in which an individual who currently holds a theory can respond to anomalous data: (1) ignore the data; (2) reject the data; (3) exclude the data from the domain of the current theory; (4) hold the data in abeyance; (5) reinterpret the data; (6) make peripheral changes to the current theory; or (7) change (...)
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  21. Ray Hyman, Evaluation of Program on Anomalous Mental Phenomena.score: 18.0
    Professor Jessica Utts and I were given the task of evaluating the program on "Anomalous Mental Phenomena" carried out at SRI International (formerly the Stanford Research Institute) from 1973 through 1989 and continued at SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation) from 1992 through 1994. We were asked to evaluate this research in terms of its scientific value. We were also asked to comment on its potential utility for intelligence applications.
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  22. W. L. Stanton (1983). Supervenience and Psychophysical Law in Anomalous Monism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 64 (January):72-9.score: 18.0
    Supervenience entails psychophysical principles, but this is compatible with anomalous monism. On what constitutes a strict psychophysical law.
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  23. Joseph Glicksohn (1998). The Anomaly of the Anomalous. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):301-302.score: 18.0
    What R&P term the implies that the psi-conducive state is related to the induction of an altered state of consciousness (ASC). Yet there is a problem in embedding psi in the ASC, because one anomaly is replacing another. This seems to be a general strategy in the literature of the anomalous.
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  24. M. De Pinedo (2006). Anomalous Monism: Oscillating Between Dogmas. Synthese 148 (1):79 - 97.score: 18.0
    Davidson's anomalous monism, his argument for the identity between mental and physical event tokens, has been frequently attacked, usually demanding a higher degree of physicalist commitment. My objection runs in the opposite direction: the identities inferred by Davidson from mental causation, the nomological character of causality and the anomaly of the mental are philosophically problematic and, more dramatically, incompatible with his famous argument against the third dogma of empiricism, the separation of content from conceptual scheme. Given the anomaly of (...)
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  25. Nancy Slonneger Hancock (2001). Anomalous Monism and Physical Closure. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:175-185.score: 18.0
    The principle of the anomalousness of the mental (PAM) is one of the most controversial principles in Donald Davidson’s argument for anomalous monism (AM). It states that there cannot be any laws (psychophysical or psychological) on the basis of which mental events can be predicted and explained. The argument against such psychological laws rests on the claim that psychology is not a comprehensive closed system (though physics is). Here I sketch the argument for AM, focusing on the role of (...)
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  26. Mehdi Nasrin (2004). Anomalous Monism in Carnap's. Erkenntnis:283-293.score: 18.0
    _The Logical Reconstruction of the World (Aufbau) is one of the major works of Rudolf Carnap in which he attempts to put an end to some of the traditional disputes in epistemology by using what he calls 'construction theory'. In this paper, I shall try to show that the traditional dualist-monist debates are among those disputes that the construction theory aims to get rid of. I will show that Carnap's position on the mind-body problem is really close to what Davidson (...)
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  27. Andreas Keinarh & Josef F. Krems (1998). The Influence of Anomalous Data on Solving Human Abductive Tasks. Philosophica 61.score: 18.0
    This paper describes an abductive process model of anomalous data integration. The model makes use of the entrenchment of the current explanation (amount of data explained) and the probability of alternative explanations. It is hypothesised that increasing confirmation of the anom-aly itself increases the probability of alternative explanations. In an experimental study we found that both the entrenchment of an existing explanation and confirmation of the anomaly clearly influence how people resolve anomalous data. These results are in agreement (...)
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  28. David Widerker (1992). Cartesian Intuitions and Anomalous Monism. Grazer Philosophische Studien 43:95-100.score: 18.0
    Recently, Colin McGinn has argued that Kripke's Cartesian argument against the mind-body identity thesis is not effective against anomalous monism. This paper attempts to show that the Cartesian has at his disposal an argument that is stronger than that formulated by Kripke, and one that cannot be rebutted by the anomalous monist in the way suggested by McGinn. The paper concludes with a suggestion as to the sort of identity theory one would have to subscribe to in order (...)
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  29. E. Cardeña, S. J. Lynn & S. Krippner (2000). Introduction: Anomalous Experiences in Perspective. In E. Cardena & S. Lynn (eds.), Varieties of Anomalous Experience: Examining the Scientific Evidence. American Psychological Association. 4.score: 18.0
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  30. E. Cardena & S. Lynn (eds.) (2000). Varieties of Anomalous Experience: Examining the Scientific Evidence. American Psychological Association.score: 18.0
  31. Jessica A. Church, Kristin K. Wenger, Nico U. F. Dosenbach, Francis M. Miezin, Steven E. Petersen & Bradley L. Schlaggar (2009). Task Control Signals in Pediatric Tourette Syndrome Show Evidence of Immature and Anomalous Functional Activity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:38-38.score: 18.0
    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a pediatric movement disorder that may affect control signaling in the brain. Previous work has proposed a dual-networks architecture of control processing involving a task-maintenance network and an adaptive control network (Dosenbach et al., 2008). A prior resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) analysis in TS has revealed functional immaturity in both putative control networks, with “anomalous” correlations (i.e. correlations outside the typical developmental range) limited to the adaptive control network (Church et al., 2009). The present (...)
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  32. Ronald J. Pekala & E. Cardena (2000). Methodological Issues in the Study of Altered States of Consciousness and Anomalous Experiences. In E. Cardena & S. Lynn (eds.), Varieties of Anomalous Experience: Examining the Scientific Evidence. American Psychological Association.score: 18.0
  33. Colin McGinn (1977). Anomalous Monism and Kripke's Cartesian Intuitions. Analysis 2 (January):78-80.score: 15.0
    It is argued that kripke's objections to the identity theory can be met by token theories. the crucial point is that the existence of the required qualitative counterparts is consistent with the absence of psychophysical correlations.
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  34. Neil Campbell, Anomalous Monism.score: 15.0
    identity theory , usually attributed to J.J.C. Smart (Smart, 1959) and U.T. Place (Place, 1956), claimed that kinds of mental states are identical to kinds of brain states. Sensations of pain, for instance, were said to be identical to the firing of C-fibres or some such type of neurological state. According to this view, then, pain, conceived as a _kind_ of mental state, is said to be _reduced_ to a certain kind of neurological state. The reduction envisaged here was modelled (...)
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  35. Patrick Haggard, P. Catledge, M. Dafydd & David A. Oakley (2004). Anomalous Control: When "Free Will" is Not Conscious. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):646-654.score: 15.0
  36. Louise M. Antony (1994). The Inadequacy of Anomalous Monism as a Realist Theory of Mind. In Gerhard Preyer, F. Siebelt & A. Ulfig (eds.), Language, Mind, and Epistemology: On Donald Davidson's Philosophy. Dordrecht: Kluwer.score: 15.0
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  37. Steven Yalowitz, Anomalous Monism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
  38. Neil Campbell (1997). The Standard Objection to Anomalous Monism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (3):373-82.score: 15.0
  39. Steven Yalowitz (1997). Rationality and the Argument for Anomalous Monism. Philosophical Studies 87 (3):235-58.score: 15.0
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  40. Aaron L. Mishara (2010). Kafka, Paranoic Doubles and the Brain: Hypnagogic Vs. Hyper-Reflexive Models of Disrupted Self in Neuropsychiatric Disorders and Anomalous Conscious States. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 5 (1):13.score: 15.0
    Kafka's writings are frequently interpreted as representing the historical period of modernism in which he was writing. Little attention has been paid, however, to the possibility that his writings may reflect neural mechanisms in the processing of self during hypnagogic (i.e., between waking and sleep) states. Kafka suffered from dream-like, hypnagogic hallucinations during a sleep-deprived state while writing. This paper discusses reasons (phenomenological and neurobiological) why the self projects an imaginary double (autoscopy) in its spontaneous hallucinations and how Kafka's writings (...)
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  41. Andrei Khrennivov (1999). Classical and Quantum Mechanics on Information Spaces with Applications to Cognitive, Psychological, Social, and Anomalous Phenomena. Foundations of Physics 29 (7):1065-1098.score: 15.0
    We use the system of p-adic numbers for the description of information processes. Basic objects of our models are so-called transformers of information, basic processes are information processes and statistics are information statistics (thus we present a model of information reality). The classical and quantum mechanical formalisms on information p-adic spaces are developed. It seems that classical and quantum mechanical models on p-adic information spaces can be applied for the investigation of flows of information in cognitive and social systems, since (...)
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  42. Neil Campbell (1998). Anomalous Monism and the Charge of Epiphenomenalism. Dialectica 52 (1):23-39.score: 15.0
  43. D. J. Bem & C. Honorton (1994). Does Psi Exist? Replicable Evidence for an Anomalous Process of Information Transfer. Psychological Bulletin 115:4-18.score: 15.0
  44. Peter Smith (1982). Bad News for Anomalous Monism? Analysis 42 (October):220-4.score: 15.0
  45. Nick Zangwill (2006). Daydreams and Anarchy: A Defense of Anomalous Mental Causation. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):253–289.score: 15.0
    Must mental properties figure in psychological causal laws if they are causally efficacious? And do those psychological causal laws give the essence of mental properties? Contrary to the prevailing consensus, I argue that, on the usual conception of laws that is in play in these debates, there are in fact lawless causally efficacious properties both in and out of the philosophy of mind. I argue that this makes a great difference to the philosophical relevance of empirical psychology. I begin by (...)
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  46. Peter Smith (1984). Anomalous Monism and Epiphenomenalism: A Reply to Honderich. Analysis 44 (2):83-86.score: 15.0
  47. Ted Honderich (1984). Donald Davidson's Anomalous Monism and the Champion of Mauve. Analysis 44.score: 15.0
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  48. Jaap van Brakel (2005). Supervenience and Anomalous Monism. Dialectica 53 (1):3-24.score: 15.0
    In this paper I argue that the intuitions which made Davidson and Hare use the word "supervenience," were not the same as those which underlie current supervenience discussions. There are crucial differences between, on the one hand, the concerns of Davidson and Hare, as I interpret them, and "received" theories of supervenience on the other. I suggest the use of the term by Davidson and Hare lends support to turning the concept upside down by giving priority to the Manifest Image (...)
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  49. Norman P. Melchert (1986). What's Wrong with Anomalous Monism. Journal of Philosophy 83 (May):265-74.score: 15.0
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  50. Larry Laudan (1981). Anomalous Anomalies. Philosophy of Science 48 (4):618-619.score: 15.0
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