Search results for 'Anthony C. Grayling' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. C. Grayling (2008). Interview - A. C. Grayling. The Philosophers' Magazine 40 (40):42-43.score: 1700.0
    AC Grayling is Britain’s leading popular philosopher. A professor at Birkbeck College, University of London, he has written over 20 books, ranging from academic monographs such as Truth, Meaning and Realism to more accessible works such as What is Good? and The Mystery of Things. His most recent books are Towards The Light and The Choice of Hercules.
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  2. A. C. Grayling (2005). The Heart of Things: Applying Philosophy to the 21st Century. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.score: 1230.0
    In this new collection A.C. Grayling adds to the variety of discussion and insight in his previous three essay collections. He returns to questions of personal ethics and the problems of the contemporary world, but also looks at the lives and ideas of great thinkers, the role of the arts in civilisation, and the need for reason everywhere Anthony Grayling illustrates in his celebrated accessible prose what each area offers to thought. In a wide-ranging array of illuminating (...)
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  3. Anthony C. Grayling (2006). Internalist Constraints on Content Externalism. In Tomáš Marvan (ed.), What Determines Content?: The Internalism/Externalism Dispute. Cambridge Scholars Press.score: 870.0
     
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  4. Simon Blackburn, Miranda Fricker, A. C. Grayling, Anthony O'Hear & Bhikhu Parekh (2005). Whose Morality is It Anyway? The Philosophers' Magazine 30 (30):41-49.score: 810.0
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  5. A. C. Grayling (2008). Scepticism and the Possibility of Knowledge. Continuum.score: 520.0
    In this series of studies A. C. Grayling looks at approaches the problem of how sceptical challenges can be met.
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  6. A. C. Grayling (2002/2003). Life, Sex, and Ideas: The Good Life Without God. Oxford University Press.score: 520.0
    "A distinctive voice somewhere between Mark Twain and Michel Montaigne" is how Psychology Today described A.C. Grayling. In Life, Sex, and Ideas: The Good Life Without God, readers have the pleasure of hearing this distinctive voice address some of the most serious topics in philosophy--and in our daily lives--including reflections on guns, anger, conflict, war; monsters, madness, decay; liberty, justice, utopia; suicide, loss, and remembrance. A civilized society, says Grayling, is one which never ceases having a discussion with (...)
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  7. A. C. Grayling (1988/2001). Wittgenstein: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 520.0
    Ludwig Wittgenstein (1889-1951) was an extraordinarily original thinker, whose influence on twentieth-century thinking far outside the bounds of philosophy alone. In this engaging Introduction, A.C. Grayling makes Wittgenstein's thought accessible to the general reader by explaining the nature and impact of Wittgenstein's views. He describes both his early and later philosophy, the differences and connections between them, and gives a fresh assessment of Wittgenstein's continuing influence on contemporary thought.
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  8. A. C. Grayling (2002). Russell: A Very Short Introduction. OUP Oxford.score: 520.0
    Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) is one of the most famous and important philosophers of the twentieth century. In this account of his life and work A.C. Grayling introduces both his technical contributions to logic and philosophy, and his wide-ranging views on education, politics, war, and sexual morality. Russell is credited with being one of the prime movers of Analytic Philosophy, and with having played a part in the revolution in social attitudes witnessed throughout the twentieth-century world. This introduction gives a (...)
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  9. A. C. Grayling (2001). The Meaning of Things: Applying Philosophy to Life. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.score: 520.0
    'The unconsidered life is not worth living' - Socrates. Thinking about life, what it means and what it holds in store does not have to be a despondent experience, but rather can be enlightening and uplifting. A life truly worth living is one that is informed and considered so a degree of philosophical insight into the inevitabilities of the human condition is inherently important and such an approach will help us to deal with real personal dilemmas. This book is an (...)
     
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  10. A. C. Grayling (2003). What is Good?: The Search for the Best Way to Live. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.score: 520.0
    In his major new book A.C. Grayling examines the different ways to live a good life, as proposed from classical antiquity to the recent present. Grayling focuses on the two very different conceptions of what a good life should be: one is a broadly secular view rooted in attitudes about human nature and the human condition; the other is a broadly transcendental view which locates the source of moral value outside the human realm. In the modern world - (...)
     
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  11. A. C. Grayling (1988). Wittgenstein. Oxford University Press.score: 300.0
    Ludwig Wittgenstein was an extraordinarily original philosopher, whose influence on 20th-century thinking goes well beyond philosophy itself. In this short, non-technical introduction to Wittgenstein's thought, Grayling describes both his early and his later philosophy, the differences and connections between them, and their effect on contemporary thought.
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  12. A. C. Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.) (2006). The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum.score: 300.0
    v. 1. A-C -- v. 2. D-J -- v. 3. K-Q -- v. 4. R-Z.
     
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  13. A. C. Grayling (1997). An Introduction to Philosophical Logic. Blackwell Publishers.score: 240.0
    This new edition keeps the same successful format, with each chapter providing a self-contained introduction to the topic it discusses, rewritten to include ...
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  14. A. C. Grayling (2010). Neurophilosophy. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):54-55.score: 240.0
  15. Adam Z. J. Zeman, A. C. Grayling & Alan Cowey (1997). Contemporary Theories of Consciousness. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 62:549-552.score: 240.0
  16. A. C. Grayling (1997). The Argument to Knowledge and Knowledge of the Past. Bradley Studies 3 (1):25-36.score: 240.0
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  17. A. C. Grayling (2005). Ensino. Critica.score: 240.0
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  18. A. C. Grayling (1992). Epistemology and Realism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 92:47 - 65.score: 240.0
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  19. A. C. Grayling, The Knot in the Brain.score: 240.0
    Among the most important questions still facing human enquiry are those about the mind and its place in nature. What is mind, and what is it relation to body? How should we best understand our common sense concepts of such mental phenomena as belief, desire, intention, emotion, reason and memory? How does the grey matter of the brain give rise to our rich and vivid experiences of colour, sound, texture, taste and smell?
     
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  20. A. C. Grayling (1987). Realism. Cogito 1 (1):25-27.score: 240.0
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  21. A. C. Grayling (2009). Q & A. The Philosophers' Magazine 46 (46):114-115.score: 240.0
  22. Ralph C. S. Walker & A. C. Grayling (1986). The Refutation of Scepticism. Philosophical Quarterly 36 (145):564.score: 240.0
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  23. A. C. Grayling (1982). Internal Structure and Essence. Analysis 42 (3):139 - 140.score: 240.0
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  24. A. C. Grayling (2005). Berkeley's Argument for Immaterialism. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. 166--189.score: 240.0
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  25. A. C. Grayling (2003). 14 Russell, Experience, and the Roots of Science. In Nicholas Griffin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Bertrand Russell. Cambridge University Press. 449.score: 240.0
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  26. David Papineau, Simon Blackburn, A. C. Grayling, Ted Honderich & Richard Norman (2002). The British Difference. The Philosophers' Magazine 18 (18):37-38.score: 240.0
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  27. A. C. Grayling (2007). A Cultural Possession. The Philosophers' Magazine 38:52-55.score: 240.0
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  28. A. C. Grayling, The Last Word on Capital Punishment.score: 240.0
    It a mistake to think that opponents of the death penalty are invariably sentimentalists, motivated by tenderness to those convicted of deliberate murder. They might, quite rightly, often be motivated by compassion for others branded as criminals, who in more rational, more just, or kinder dispensations would not be criminals at all – for example, soliciting prostitutes and drug addicts. They might also understand, although (a different thing) neither condone nor forgive, murder committed in the unmeditated grip of passion. Such (...)
     
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  29. A. C. Grayling (2004). A Man for All Reasons. The Philosophers' Magazine 26:28-30.score: 240.0
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  30. A. C. Grayling (2000). Naturalistic Assumptions. In A. Orenstein & Petr Kotatko (eds.), Knowledge, Language and Logic: Questions for Quine. Kluwer Academic Print on Demand. 47--56.score: 240.0
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  31. A. C. Grayling, The Last Word on Death.score: 240.0
    If we base our understanding of death on evidence rather than fear or desire, we are bound to accept it as a twofold natural process: the cessation of bodily functions, including consciousness, followed by the body's dispersion into its physical elements. Cessation of function and the beginning of physical transformation occur together at the moment of death; exactly what constitutes that moment is a matter of controversy, an important matter because many physiological functions can now be sustained artificially. But there (...)
     
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  32. A. C. Grayling (1990). Wittgenstein's Influence: Meaning, Mind and Method. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 28:61-78.score: 240.0
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  33. A. C. Grayling, Can an Atheist Be a Fundamentalist?score: 240.0
    It is time to put to rest the mistakes and assumptions that lie behind a phrase used by some religious people when talking of those who are plain-spoken about their disbelief in any religious claims: the phrase "fundamentalist atheist". What would a non-fundamentalist atheist be? Would he be someone who believed only somewhat that there are no supernatural entities in the universe - perhaps that there is only part of a god (a divine foot, say, or buttock)? Or that gods (...)
     
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  34. A. C. Grayling (1995). Concept-Reference and Kinds. In Petr Kotatko & John Biro (eds.), Frege: Sense and Reference One Hundred Years Later. Kluwer. 75--93.score: 240.0
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  35. A. C. Grayling, Education and Gender Differences.score: 240.0
    Half-lost in the now predictable August clamour about sex differences in examination results, renewed today by publication of the GCSE results, are old familiar clues, swirling neglected like scraps of paper in the storm around our heads. In one page of the newspaper you read that girls are doing better than boys at A Level and GCSE, in another you read that young women get fewer Firsts at Oxford than young men, in a third you read how much better all (...)
     
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  36. A. C. Grayling, The Secular and the Sacred.score: 240.0
    Religion has been given comfortable house room in liberal democracies, which protect the right of people to believe as they wish, and accept the wide variety of faiths brought into them by immigrants from all over the world. This is right and proper, for freedom of speech and belief are essential values, and the very idea of democratic society is premised on the idea of responsibly exercised liberty.
     
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  37. A. C. Grayling (2006). Epistemic Finitude and the Framework of Inference. In Stephen Cade Hetherington (ed.), Epistemology Futures. Oxford University Press. 169.score: 240.0
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  38. A. C. Grayling (2006). Humanism, Religion, and Ethics. In Dolan Cummings (ed.), Debating Humanism. Imprint Academic. 26--47.score: 240.0
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  39. A. C. Grayling, Morality and the Churches.score: 240.0
    Last week the Government announced that it is to add a clause to its current education bill requiring that schools should promote marriage and "other stable relationships" as ideals, and should encourage pupils to delay engaging in sex until they are older. The proposal is a sop to those, chief among them the churches, who oppose repeal of the notorious Clause 28 which forbids "promotion of homosexuality" by public bodies.
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  40. A. C. Grayling (1995). Modern Philosophy II: The Empiricists. In , Philosophy: A Guide Through the Subject. Oxford University Press. 484--544.score: 240.0
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  41. A. C. Grayling (ed.) (1998). Philosophy 1: A Guide Through the Subject. OUP Oxford.score: 240.0
    This is the first volume of a two-volume introduction to and guide through philosophy. It is intended to orientate, assist, and stimulate the reader at every stage in the study of the subject. Eleven extended essays have been specially commissioned from leading philosophers; each surveys a major area of the subject and offers an accessible but sophisticated account of the main debates. -/- An extended introduction maps out the philosophical terrain and explains how the different subjects relate to each other. (...)
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  42. A. C. Grayling (ed.) (1995). Philosophy: A Guide Through the Subject. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    This comprehensive new collection is designed as a complete introduction to philosophy for students and general readers. Consisting of eleven extended essays, specially commissioned for this volume from leading philosophers, the book surveys all of the major areas of philosophy and offers an accessible but sophisticated guide to the main debates. An extended introduction provides general context and explains how the different subjects are related. The first part of the book deals with the foundations of philosophical inquiry: epistemology, philosophical logic, (...)
     
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  43. A. C. Grayling (ed.) (1998). Philosophy 2: Further Through the Subject. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    This companion to the highly successful Philosophy: A Guide through the Subject, (recently reissued as Philosophy 1) is a lively and authoritative guide through important areas of philosophy that are typically studied in the later parts of an undergraduate course. Thirteen extended essays have been specially commissioned, each introducing a major area and giving an accessible and up-to-date account of the main debates. The first seven cover the philosophies of language, psychology, religion, and the natural and social sciences. The second (...)
     
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  44. A. C. Grayling (2007/2008). The Choice of Hercules: Pleasure, Duty and the Good Life in the 21st Century. Phoenix.score: 240.0
     
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  45. A. C. Grayling (1998). The Empiricists. Philosophy 1.score: 240.0
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  46. A. C. Grayling (2006/2007). The Form of Things: Essays on Life, Ideas, and Liberty in the 21st Century. Phoenix.score: 240.0
     
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